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  1. #1
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    New tires for my vintage race bike?

    Hi, new to racing here. Been a runner for a few years now and started road biking last year. Really enjoy it so far, and wanting to expand my racing from just foot races (I've done dozens of 5k-1/2 marathons, plus 2 full so far) to include duathlon. There is one in July I plan on doing (sprint distance). While I love my '88 LeTour I decided to get another bike for a few reasons, I mean you can't have just a single bike right? But loving the vintage Schwinns I found a similar one to my '88 LeTour but from their higher end race offerings, an '88 Prologue in great shape.



    Anyhow I want to set this up more for a going fast bike, trainer/racer. I don't plan on putting a lot of money into it, one reason I went with the old bike. It seems to have decent stuff on it, Suntour Sprint, which after doing some research here seems to be good stuff back then. So I'm just looking for doing some basic/most important upgrade. My guess is the tires for now. It came with Kenda K152 90psi max which after looking around seem to be the type of tire you may see at Wallmart on sale for $10. I'd like to put some good tires on it, ones that will be a good choice for racing also. I'd like something that looks good but also fits the vintage aspect. I've done some homework and spent hours reading tire suggestions on here until my head spun. Seems there are lots of opinions there. And not being pro racer, its probably not as critical. After all my reading and searching I kind of like these: Veloflex Master. I've seen many places selling them for 30-some dollars so that seems fairly inexpensive to me. They seem to have great reviews and also available with a gum sidewall which keeps the vintage look. They are also available in colored tread, and I am thinking perhaps red might match the bike well? Kind of a nice twist of modern colored tires with vintage gumwall. What do you think? Seem to be a lot of debate between 23mm vs 25mm and I'm unsure which way to go. If it makes a difference I'm about 150-155 lbs.

    I'm not too familiar with rim tech but what’s on it now is Weinmann hard anodized aero rims. I assume these are compatible. Also tubes... there were a few mentions of running latex tubes with these, good idea?

    Is this all a good plan? Any other good upgrades I should be looking at or just use the rest as is? Not sure if there can be any significant weight savings swapping the seat, or less resistance with newer chains? For now I'd be happy with just new shoes but love to hear any opinions on other things as well. Thanks!
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    Last edited by T Stew; 04-07-15 at 05:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    First I'd do a fit of some kind. Make sure the bike is set up closer to optimal than not. If you're a fit rider then that position realistically is not right, just a wild ass guess.

    You'll be fine with 23c tires. Personally I'd stick with butyl, the benefits of latex would be minor in the scheme of things. 25c are more durable, will be more comfy, but unless you're on rough pavement all the time probably unnecessary.

    The Weimann rims from then were fine, not great, not horrible. See if you have double eyelet rims (the brass part that the spoke nipple sits in extends to the outer wall, it's not just a donut on the inner wall. One of the tricks back then to get weight down on spec was to put single eyelet rims vs double eyelet. I mention this because single eyelet rims will crack much more readily than double. If you have single just keep aware of this - back in the day (I was a shop rat when these bikes were being sold) we saw a lot of broken single eyelet rims.

    The biggest things you can do, after a fit:
    1. Clipless pedals. These keep your foot in the right place on the pedal, let you pull up some, and really help on hills. The most important part is the planting your foot on the pedal so your position doesn't change as you pedal.
    2. Aero bars, if you're doing dual/tri type things. If not then skip it.
    2A. Right side bar end shifter. If you're going to be doing group rides then a right side bar end shifter will go a long way towards allowing you to shift in the middle of an effort.

    You can pare some weight off judiciously but don't go out and focus on it, just take advantage of stuff as you see it. Like used saddles and such. This is how I get my lighter stuff.

    Really, though, with a fit, the bar end shifter, and the clipless pedals, you'll be set for most riding situations.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  3. #3
    Senior Member ips0803's Avatar
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    23 mm Masters would suit that bike very well.

  4. #4
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    First I'd do a fit of some kind. Make sure the bike is set up closer to optimal than not. If you're a fit rider then that position realistically is not right, just a wild ass guess.
    Very true, I got it through the mail dissembled so as you see it there is just me slapping it together and just a real quick couple adjustments to get it to fit ok. Probably not near optimal yet. I'll have to ask the lbs about a fit if I take it in for a tune up, is that something they should do or is it something I can do with a bit of research or guidance?

    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    You'll be fine with 23c tires. Personally I'd stick with butyl, the benefits of latex would be minor in the scheme of things. 25c are more durable, will be more comfy, but unless you're on rough pavement all the time probably unnecessary.
    I can stick with butyl, I wasn't sure if the benefits of latex would mean that much to me. But we are only talking a few bucks more each so its something easy I could do without a bunch of money if it was an upgrade. I'm not worried about a super supple ride on this bike. I'll save comfort and long haul for the LeTour which I put Panaracer Paselas 1 1/8 on and seem good enough for that. If they wear out I might up to 1 1/4", but this bike I want to focus on speed. My bike path I usually go on does have a few gravel road crossings, and the road right by my house is partly chip seal, so I want something that isn't so fragile it won't stand up to gravel crossings or occasional grit and bits.

    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    2. Aero bars, if you're doing dual/tri type things. If not then skip it.
    Well that is the intent of this bike. I wondered about those. Is that an add on part or an entire handlebar replacement? I'm not opposed to simply using what I have first, but if I also want to upgrade the shifters maybe I could do it all in one go.


    Quote Originally Posted by ips0803 View Post
    23 mm Masters would suit that bike very well.
    Thanks, at least I'm on the right track then with my research! Do you think the red/gumwall tires would look good, or should I stick to black/gumwall? I'm not sure how hard it is to keep the colored ones looking clean.

    Thanks fellas for helping me out!

  5. #5
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    That's a fine looking bike. I wouldn't be too quick to change out the shifters as there are a lot of variables to think about. I'd get some high quality 23c-25c racing tires and clipless pedals. You'll figure out what else you need after you've raced it a few times.

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    You can put clip on aero bars on the thing. You can pick up some for pretty cheap - I did so for my track bike.

    You really start getting into the fit though - the aero bars are more aero because they put you in a more aero position. However if you're not taking advantage of the fit then the aero bars may not accomplish much, if anything at all.

    You may not need an all out computer type fit for a regular road set up. I have friends that have seen some objective/measurable changes after a fancy fit, but I also think that you can get much of that benefit initially without resorting to the computer fit. I fit a few folks back in the day (top level international Masters racer, top level domestic dualthlete, low level Euro pro), a few friends more recently. The last real fit I did was a friend/teammate who'd gotten "officially fit" but whose position seemed off to me. He let me go nuts on his position and the result? He won the next three Tues night training races (he hadn't won one before) and placed in a big-to-him goal race. SInce then he's actually beaten me in various races at my own strength, the sprint.

    The fit is here. You can dig around his blog for the wins/places. Basically his fitness really didn't change but his position allowed him to use it better - more aero, more power, better handling.

    If you have any quirks - bum knee/hip/whatever/etc - then you may want a more objective fit. For normal folks a sort of subjective fit like the one I did for my friend would be fine for starters.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  7. #7
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    Sweet bike! In addition to tires and pedals, I'd get some modern brake pads. The ones on there look like they might be original; something from Koolstop or Swissstop would be a relatively cheap and easy upgrade. I'd also go with new rim strips - they're the strips of rubber or cloth that go around the inside of the rims and shield the tubes from the spoke nipples.
    Regards,
    Chuck

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    Quote Originally Posted by revchuck View Post
    Sweet bike! In addition to tires and pedals, I'd get some modern brake pads. The ones on there look like they might be original; something from Koolstop or Swissstop would be a relatively cheap and easy upgrade. I'd also go with new rim strips - they're the strips of rubber or cloth that go around the inside of the rims and shield the tubes from the spoke nipples.
    Good call on the brake pads, I agree 100%. It's one of the few things I would upgrade/modernize on virtually any bike.

    Ditto checking the rim strips. With the Weinmann rims you'll need to know how wide you need them, some used extremely narrow strips.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  9. #9
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
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    If your main plan is to do duathlons, I would suggest old fashioned toe clips and straps rather than clipless. Save yourself some time in transition, especially in a sprint distance.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

  10. #10
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    Good call on the brake pads, I agree 100%. It's one of the few things I would upgrade/modernize on virtually any bike.

    Ditto checking the rim strips. With the Weinmann rims you'll need to know how wide you need them, some used extremely narrow strips.
    I'll check out the rims soon. One thing I wasn't sure of, when a bike shop does a tune up and trues the tires what are they adjusting? Will they take the tires off or is this something that's done with them on. Wasn't sure if it mattered if I put the new tape and tires on before or after I get it tuned up.

    The brakes may be original, they said Dia-Comp on em at least. I was very surprised how good they are though. I put new brake pads on my LeTour and it doesn't stop nearly as easily. This Prologue stops so fast I almost lost it the first time I braked hard coming up to a road crossing it stopped so quick!

    Quote Originally Posted by caloso View Post
    If your main plan is to do duathlons, I would suggest old fashioned toe clips and straps rather than clipless. Save yourself some time in transition, especially in a sprint distance.
    Well I have a confession to make. Wasn't going to bring it up since it will probably sound very odd to everyone but since there where so many suggestions of pedals - know that I already did my pedal upgrade (Ergon PC2). I am a barefooter, both running and cycling. I know I loose some efficiency there but I prefer the cool, dry, and non-cramped feet. A wipe out at speed would really suck but so far I've not had any issues whether its been the marathons I've run, mountains I've hiked, or time spent on the bike. No time lost in transition that way either, so one plus. Only time I put shoes on is when its too cold, or required, usually.

    I want to thank you all for the advice. I'm slowly learning bike tech. There is just so much to it and so many options out there. Now that its warming up I am so looking forward to more time on the saddle as well as on foot!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by T Stew View Post
    I'll check out the rims soon. One thing I wasn't sure of, when a bike shop does a tune up and trues the tires what are they adjusting? Will they take the tires off or is this something that's done with them on. Wasn't sure if it mattered if I put the new tape and tires on before or after I get it tuned up.

    The brakes may be original, they said Dia-Comp on em at least. I was very surprised how good they are though. I put new brake pads on my LeTour and it doesn't stop nearly as easily. This Prologue stops so fast I almost lost it the first time I braked hard coming up to a road crossing it stopped so quick!


    Well I have a confession to make. Wasn't going to bring it up since it will probably sound very odd to everyone but since there where so many suggestions of pedals - know that I already did my pedal upgrade (Ergon PC2). I am a barefooter, both running and cycling. I know I loose some efficiency there but I prefer the cool, dry, and non-cramped feet. A wipe out at speed would really suck but so far I've not had any issues whether its been the marathons I've run, mountains I've hiked, or time spent on the bike. No time lost in transition that way either, so one plus. Only time I put shoes on is when its too cold, or required, usually.

    I want to thank you all for the advice. I'm slowly learning bike tech. There is just so much to it and so many options out there. Now that its warming up I am so looking forward to more time on the saddle as well as on foot!
    Usually a shop will not remove the tires/tubes to true the wheel. They'll just remove the wheel from the bike to put it in a truing stand.

    For barefoot there is a significant risk of injury if you fall. I tried using triathlon shoes, which aren't as protective as regular cycling shoes, and it was the most painful thing when I had a minor scrape along the top of my toes. I was otherwise unhurt but wow it felt like someone skinned me alive. Which is basically what happened.

    However, if you're okay with it, you might be able to find some full sole clip in type pedal things. I can't remember what they were called but they were designed to allow a runner to use their running shoe on the pedals. They were sold in limited quantities back in the early-mid 90s. I imagine that a foot would work in such a pedal as well. I failed when trying to Google for them.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

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    pyro platform pedals. These seem to be a modern version of what I was thinking of.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  13. #13
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Debated starting a new thread, but since we specifically talked about this I'll bring this one back up.

    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    The Weimann rims from then were fine, not great, not horrible. See if you have double eyelet rims (the brass part that the spoke nipple sits in extends to the outer wall, it's not just a donut on the inner wall. One of the tricks back then to get weight down on spec was to put single eyelet rims vs double eyelet. I mention this because single eyelet rims will crack much more readily than double. If you have single just keep aware of this - back in the day (I was a shop rat when these bikes were being sold) we saw a lot of broken single eyelet rims.
    Ok so I finally took a close look at the rim, pulled both tires off to check the tape and width (seems the tape on there now is 1/2"). The tape seemed fine so I let it be for now. So how does one check if its double eyelet or single? I thought it was that little ring around the spoke I can see on my other rims, but this one has none. This is what I got:

    IMG_9182-1000.JPG

    I looked around where the spokes went into the rim, front rim looked fine. But on the rear wheel, I found what looked like 2 spots where little cracks were...

    IMG_9196-1000.jpg

    Also on that rim there was a black strip that you can see in the pic barely - it almost seemed like a super thin tape or coating and was coming off in spots. not sure what it is, none of it on the front rim and under it looks like it should except for where the anodizing came off with it.

    So how serious is this? These rims now junk?

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    The rear rim is at the end of its life span. Check in the Classic & Vintage sales subforum and you might find a replacement, or post a question in the C&V subforum and they might be able to point you in the right direction. Good bunch of folks over there.
    Regards,
    Chuck

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    Eyelets:
    double vs none (you have none), from whatever wheel works is in NZ:


    Single eyelet is just a ring in the rim, like something you'd see in a tarp. Double eyelet is what's pictured above (ties the outer and inner walls together, weighs more, but is helpful in that you can't drop a spoke nipple into the rim, etc).

    No eyelet rims, for best practice, should use washers under the spoke nipple (to allow the nipple turn without grinding the rim), but they are heavy (and add the weight the not having eyelets saves), they are labor intensive (esp if you drop a washer into the rim), and most people/companies don't use them.

    With corroded nipples it's worse.

    As pointed out above the rear rim is starting to go. You'll pull those spokes through eventually, although it's impossible to tell when. You can track it, by checking to see if the crack is growing. A good impact at the exact wrong time will make it much worse.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  16. #16
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Thanks fellas, that sucks. But hey its an old bike. Since I want to set this up more for racing, perhaps this gives me the opportunity for an upgrade here. I can post over in C&V but I wonder if a more modern rim may be better... I hear lots talk about tubular wheels (especially for racing it seems) is that something that may be compatible with what I have?

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    It may not be worth it to upgrade. You might be better off selling the bike and buying a more modern used bike. Depnds on what you want to get out of it. You could do a lot of work yourself if that's part of what draws you to cycling. If you just want to ride I'd look into getting a different bike. You'll be a couple hundred dollars into the bike and constantly be dealing with this or that not being 100% compatible. With a newer bike, for a net difference of a few hundred dollars (if you can sell this one for a couple hundred) you could be on a lower level less-than-5-years old bike that is new enough to have a 10 speed rear wheel, compatible derailleurs, etc.

    Tubulars are different construction, and unless you're doing massive speed changes (criterium racing typically) or you need super low pressure durability (cyclocross), I wouldn't use tubulars. I do criteriums (aka crits) and I think tubulars give me a (slight) boost, but in training I use clinchers. I'm consistently faster with heavy aero clinchers (3 lbs or 1400g heavier than my race tubulars) in training since I don't do lots of massive speed changes. However in crits I got shelled every time I used the aero clinchers, I'm attributing it to the weight since the aero profile is similar to my favorite pair of race wheels.

    If you want to upgrade and you're thinking of doing duathlons/etc then a pair of aero clinchers will be a 100% usable set of wheels, transferrable for the most part from bike to bike. You'll be able to train on them, race with them, and even do some crits and stuff if you wanted to delve into mass start racing.

    I may have all sorts of wheels and such but I bought many of them used. A set of used not-wide, 21mm wide rim, clinchers (around 2009 or earlier) shouldn't be very much. Once you get into the wide rims (23mm to as wide as 28mm) then it starts costing money. Wider rims give you more cushion, are heavier, are not as aero overall (since it's technically wider, but to get a 21mm rim to be more aero you need to use even narrower tires), but at some level more reliable due to the extra width. I use 23mm rims right now, I'll go 25mm when I could afford them, mainly so I don't have to readjust my brakes between race and training wheels. My race wheels are 26-28mm wide.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

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    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Gotcha, thanks. Yeah I tried searching around and was a bit confused with compatibility. In any case most were very expensive, maybe later if I get more into racing, or just get a new bike. But for now I guess I'll settle with good enough. I've got several things I'm ready to buy, like the aforementioned Veloflex (either Master or Corsa) and tubes, bar tape, etc... going to order from wiggle likely, does any of their rims seem to be decent price/quality for general road/light racing? For example I think this is basically my selection there: wiggle.com Cycle | Road Rims + 700c (622) Wheels (minus the disc brake ones of course). I assume I'd need new spokes too and have the lbs assemble? Or can one assemble wheels themselves? I'm a diy'er but don't have bike specific tools yet other than the big Topeak AlienII multi tool to get me started.

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    For just one wheel, you'll probably find it's cheaper to buy a pre-made wheel than to buy the stuff to build your own (or pay someone to do it). Especially if you're on a budget. Custom wheels can be awesome, but don't really fit in with the price point you're looking at. I've found some really good wheel deals at velomine.com in the past, but I'm not sure they'd have what you're looking for - depending on what that is. Do you happen to know what the spacing of your rear triangle is? If it's 130 mm and your downtube shifters can do friction (most can), you can get a modern wheel and throw an 8 speed cassette on there for pretty cheap. Even if your spacing is 126 mm, you should be able to fit a 130 mm wheel in there. Much easier than hunting down an old freewheel and wheel. Sure you could put something more than 8 speeds on there, but 9/10 speeds can be a little close to hit precisely while friction shifting and some people have had issues with 10 speed chains on 7/8 speed cranks.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"

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    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Also, if you want to go bar end on the right side, there are various places that make a pod for that so you can just move your shift lever there and run new cables, no new lever needed. Or hell, for ~$50, you could get a pair of Kelley Take Offs that let you move both your downtube levers to your brakes so you can shift while not taking your hands off your hoods.
    Last edited by himespau; 04-14-15 at 11:49 AM.
    Punctuation is important. It's the difference between "I helped my uncle, Jack, off a horse" and "I helped my uncle Jack off a horse"

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    If that were my bike, I'd be so tempted to get a silver 5800 groupset from the UK and a compatible 32 spoke wheelset from Velomine and call it good.
    Regards,
    Chuck

    Demain, on roule!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by revchuck View Post
    If that were my bike, I'd be so tempted to get a silver 5800 groupset from the UK and a compatible 32 spoke wheelset from Velomine and call it good.
    Concur.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

  23. #23
    Senior Member T Stew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    It may not be worth it to upgrade. You might be better off selling the bike and buying a more modern used bike. Depnds on what you want to get out of it. You could do a lot of work yourself if that's part of what draws you to cycling. If you just want to ride I'd look into getting a different bike. You'll be a couple hundred dollars into the bike and constantly be dealing with this or that not being 100% compatible. With a newer bike, for a net difference of a few hundred dollars (if you can sell this one for a couple hundred) you could be on a lower level less-than-5-years old bike that is new enough to have a 10 speed rear wheel, compatible derailleurs, etc.
    I don't really plan on selling it or getting newer, at least anytime soon. I kind of like my 1988 bikes If this one is going to take a lot of work I'll just use my '88 LeTour for my upcoming race. It may be 5 lbs heavier and wider tires, lower end stuff, but it rides nice and I like it. That is my bike 'just to ride'. I just wanted a bike I can setup as my go fast bike, but still fit my vintage likes, well and to have a backup bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by himespau View Post
    For just one wheel, you'll probably find it's cheaper to buy a pre-made wheel than to buy the stuff to build your own (or pay someone to do it). Especially if you're on a budget. Custom wheels can be awesome, but don't really fit in with the price point you're looking at. I've found some really good wheel deals at velomine.com in the past, but I'm not sure they'd have what you're looking for - depending on what that is. Do you happen to know what the spacing of your rear triangle is? If it's 130 mm and your downtube shifters can do friction (most can), you can get a modern wheel and throw an 8 speed cassette on there for pretty cheap. Even if your spacing is 126 mm, you should be able to fit a 130 mm wheel in there. Much easier than hunting down an old freewheel and wheel.
    Well I guess I need some kind of ballpark about what price we're talking about here. I have no problems affording it, I'm just frugal and don't want to pump too much into upgrades that I don't necessarily need... but if its damaged and the difference of not being able to use the bike anymore than I have no problem making it right and getting it into good shape.

    Well I don't have anything metric handy but I measured with a ruler and it was about 5" which translates to 127mm. But exactly how do you properly measure? In between or like from the outsides?

    I'm not to worried about the shifter right now. But that might be something I consider in the future, maybe winter project for next year. Was hoping to get new tires and training on this bike already, but now I feel like this rim issue has everything on hold until I figure out what to do. 7 speeds is plenty for me, my Letour is 6 and thats actually fine by me. Not sure if this Suntour will do friction. The Suntour on my LeTour has a switch that has a position for Index and Friction. The ones on this Prologue just say Index.

    Quote Originally Posted by revchuck View Post
    If that were my bike, I'd be so tempted to get a silver 5800 groupset from the UK and a compatible 32 spoke wheelset from Velomine and call it good.
    UK? As in United Kingdom or are you referring to something else? I'm not sure how to determine if a wheelset is compatable. I take it there is more to it than just the spoke count and size?

  24. #24
    Senior Member himespau's Avatar
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    Yeah, you measure inside to inside. When things were 6/7 speed, the spacing was usually 126 mm. When it went to 8+ speeds, the spacing became 130 mm. For a few years during the transition, the spacing was 128 mm so you could use either size wheels. Since your frame is steel, you can flex it out a little bit to put a 130 mm hub in there without causing damage (might be a problem with aluminum/carbon but steel can flex a bit without losing structural integrity). It's just a little harder to get the wheels in and out, but it's not a huge deal.

    As far as the UK comment, there are weird distribution systems in place, but if you order from a website in the United Kingdom like Probikekit, RibbleCycles, ChainReactionCycles, Wiggle, etc. while you are in the United States so that you don't have to pay the VAT, you can actually get an entire modern groupset shipped to your door for cheaper than your local bike shop (or any US-based website) can get it from their suppliers. 11 speed 105-level shimano would be in the $350-400 range shipped to you for integrated shifter/brake levers, derailleurs, crankset, chain, gears, cables. Then you could go to velomine and get 11 speed (be careful to check that they are 5800 11 speed compatible) 105 hubs laced to H+Son TB14 (box section so they'd look pretty similar to what the bike came with originally if style points are important to you) for ~$200. Or you could go slightly more aerodynamic (I think duathlons are like triathlons where you can't draft so aero is important to you, right?) with Mavic CXP22 rims laced to the same 105 hubs for $160. For an extra $100, you could go with the lighter, "better", slightly more aero yet CXP33 laced to ultegra hubs, all of which would not look terribly out of place on you nice classic bike.

    Add in $10-20 for some new bar tape, and you'd be rocking a completely new drive train on your classic bike that would work as well as anything you line up against (though maybe a little less aerodynamic than the top guys and a couple pounds heavier) but looking so much more sweet and classic (and the steel is real folks would tell you you'd have a smoother ride which will make you less fatigued from having to absorb road buzz which would make you enough faster to make up for the weight - I don't know about all that), for $550-600. That's where CDR was going in saying that at that price you could buy a pretty decent used modern bike. Of course the components would all be used and it wouldn't be a 1988 lugged steel Schwinn which may be important to you - you may feel it has more soul. I've done something similar with a 1990 Concorde Aquila in Team PDM colors(though with Campagnolo - and I don't race it). That chrome and those lugs (and the braze on race number hanger) make it seem much more somehow than something new. Sure it was still probably made in a factory, but there's some romance about that factory being in Italy. I don't know what is is. Over in C&V, there's a whole thread called Retro Roadies about people putting modern gear on old race bikes. Something like 300 pages at this point.

    My numbers all assume you do all the work yourself (and don't include the tires that you came here to ask about originally before I just spent an imaginary $600 of your money), but it is a good idea to be able to do all that yourself (if you have the time) so you know how to keep everything maintained and fix things when they go wrong.
    Last edited by himespau; 04-16-15 at 04:56 AM.
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    himespau answered your questions about my response. Having done something similar to my '87 Centurion Ironman, I can vouch for the idea that upgrading from downtube shifters to STIs is well worth it in terms of user-friendliness. Your rear dropouts are almost certainly 126mm, and it's no big thing to either cold-set them to 130mm or just spread them when inserting the rear wheel. The thread he referenced is here. It's actually only 182 pages long.
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    Chuck

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