Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

"The 33"-Road Bike Racing We set this forum up for our members to discuss their experiences in either pro or amateur racing, whether they are the big races, or even the small backyard races. Don't forget to update all the members with your own race results.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-31-16, 04:27 PM   #1
Nicholas_Landy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Bikes: Scott CR1 20
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Professional Cycling

Hi, I am 18 years old and am seriously considering trying to become a professional cyclist. I just wanted some peoples opinions on whether it is too late to get into it? I do have a training coach if that makes any help to my question.

Last edited by cb400bill; 08-31-16 at 05:32 PM. Reason: Merged threads.
Nicholas_Landy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 05:17 PM   #2
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE
Posts: 5,720
Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2017 Post(s)
It is absolutely Not too late.

A lot of riders start as pre-teens and work their way up, but there are some (you hear the tales if you listen to the announcers chatter on during race broadcasts) who start late, who didn't start until they were 22 and are riding in the ProTour peloton at 24 ....

Not saying that will be you ... but all that matters is whether you have the mind and body to compete at that level .... and if not, you can compete at a lower level .... your will and determination count for a lot.

if you are willing to do the work and take instruction, and can learn tactics quickly .... there is no limit to what you might do besides your inherent genetic makeup. Take that as far as possible.

Always remember Pete Rose---not for being an inveterate gambler, but for proving that someone Without the top-tier gifts could beat out the more gifted players through hard work.

You take whatever nature gave you as far as it can go ... and you will overtake a lot of lazy, gifted people .... and maybe you will find that you have the physical as well as the mental gifts and we will be listening to the announcers talk about you during the slow parts of some Grand Tour stage broadcast.
Maelochs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 05:22 PM   #3
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
Posts: 20,349
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 468 Post(s)
Enter races , train hard, recover hard, eat well, learn, try hard.......

What races have you done so far ?
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: http://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 05:40 PM   #4
TMonk
Not actually Tmonk
 
TMonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Bikes: road, track, mtb
Posts: 9,451
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 359 Post(s)
+1 on the previous two posts.

How much experience do you have? If you've been riding for a couple years or less, wait till you have a few years of riding lots and at least a couple seasons of racing under your belt before you can assess your potential. If/when you start racing, you should know fairly quickly whether you have the potential to become truly elite, or whether you're just an average joe like the rest of us,
__________________
"Your beauty is an aeroplane;
so high, my heart cannot bear the strain." -A.C. Jobim, Triste
TMonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 05:50 PM   #5
Nicholas_Landy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Bikes: Scott CR1 20
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
professional cycling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
Enter races , train hard, recover hard, eat well, learn, try hard.......

What races have you done so far ?
I have done 3 individual road races as Cat 5 placing top 5 in each race for my first 3 races ever, I just finished an Omnium over the weekend placing #4 overall. I am coming from competitive running in highschool so I have ability!
Nicholas_Landy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 05:51 PM   #6
Nicholas_Landy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Bikes: Scott CR1 20
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
professional cycling

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
It is absolutely Not too late.

A lot of riders start as pre-teens and work their way up, but there are some (you hear the tales if you listen to the announcers chatter on during race broadcasts) who start late, who didn't start until they were 22 and are riding in the ProTour peloton at 24 ....

Not saying that will be you ... but all that matters is whether you have the mind and body to compete at that level .... and if not, you can compete at a lower level .... your will and determination count for a lot.

if you are willing to do the work and take instruction, and can learn tactics quickly .... there is no limit to what you might do besides your inherent genetic makeup. Take that as far as possible.

Always remember Pete Rose---not for being an inveterate gambler, but for proving that someone Without the top-tier gifts could beat out the more gifted players through hard work.

You take whatever nature gave you as far as it can go ... and you will overtake a lot of lazy, gifted people .... and maybe you will find that you have the physical as well as the mental gifts and we will be listening to the announcers talk about you during the slow parts of some Grand Tour stage broadcast.
Wow! this helps me a lot I appreciate the time you have taken to explain this to me thank you very much!
Nicholas_Landy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 06:06 PM   #7
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 515 Post(s)
Since you are, as you say, "catting up" so quickly, you will surely be noticed by a team. All you need to do right now is keep winning races! Consider traveling if your season has ended locally. Good luck!
shelbyfv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 06:07 PM   #8
PepeM
Senior Member
 
PepeM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 5,926
Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1983 Post(s)
You'll need a new frame for that.
PepeM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 06:38 PM   #9
Nicholas_Landy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Bikes: Scott CR1 20
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
professional cycling

Quote:
Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
Since you are, as you say, "catting up" so quickly, you will surely be noticed by a team. All you need to do right now is keep winning races! Consider traveling if your season has ended locally. Good luck!
Yes i just did my last race locally not very many places that are doing RR and crits anymore the season really has come to an end... Sadly but i plan on mid cat 4 next season!
Nicholas_Landy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 06:39 PM   #10
Nicholas_Landy
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Gainesville, Georgia
Bikes: Scott CR1 20
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
professional cycling

Quote:
Originally Posted by PepeM View Post
You'll need a new frame for that.
I plan on it HAHA
Nicholas_Landy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 08:05 PM   #11
spectastic
Supreme Adrninistrator
 
spectastic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: inside my body
Bikes: a few
Posts: 3,949
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 327 Post(s)
important to ask yourself why you want to be a pro cyclist. it's a high price to pay for little extrinsic rewards.

i am constantly surprised by how many of us are single. imagine if we were all going out on friday and saturday nights instead of sleeping to get ready for the weekend rides. sheeeiiiiiiit

Last edited by spectastic; 08-31-16 at 08:15 PM.
spectastic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-16, 08:55 PM   #12
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Bikes: Felt AR
Posts: 798
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 430 Post(s)
It's not necessarily too late, but it's flat out ridiculously too early.

It's really silly for someone to do 3 races and then start publicly announcing their desire to be a pro.

Imagine this in other sports:

Do three little league games and start talking about the MLB? Join a high school football team and start talking about the draft after three games? Jump in a rec. league and start talking about posting up in the NBA?

Doesn't that sound really silly? Professional cycling is not different in the ability levels to become a professional.
rubiksoval is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 08:30 AM   #13
echappist 
fuggitivo solitario
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northern NJ
Bikes:
Posts: 8,985
Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicholas_Landy View Post
I have done 3 individual road races as Cat 5 placing top 5 in each race for my first 3 races ever, I just finished an Omnium over the weekend placing #4 overall. I am coming from competitive running in highschool so I have ability!
as a caveat , while running ability generally carry over to cycling, there's no guarantee that this would apply on an individual basis.

A significant component of running performance is biomechanical efficiency (not to be confused with metabolic efficiency), which has about no effect when it comes to cycling. A high biomechanical efficiency allows you to compete against people who otherwise has high aerobic capability but low biomechanical efficiency. If you are a middle distance runner type with some muscles, there is a better chance that things would carry over.

The other thing is that while good running advantage may carry you quickly to the cat-2 level, going from there gets a lot harder. This is especially true of the aerobically gifted who upgraded by riding away from the pack without picking up any race craft. The aerobic advantage is mostly negated by the cat-2 level as others are just as strong, and you will then need to learn race craft when things are a lot harder. As boring as it may be, hone your race craft in the lower categories before you move up.
echappist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 08:36 AM   #14
furiousferret
Senior Member
 
furiousferret's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redlands, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 4,751
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Almost all the pros in the US get there by 2 methods; 1) Racing in USAC, getting upgrades and winning big races which gets them noticed or 2) Racing in the College system. Another route would be racing in Europe.

Regardless, all these paths are straightforward; race and win. Its not like becoming a clown where you have to go to clown school in France and then travel on trains with hobos.
furiousferret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 10:24 AM   #15
carpediemracing
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tariffville, CT
Bikes: Tsunami Bikes
Posts: 14,879
Mentioned: 23 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
As a reference point regarding running a local former low-level pro said that he ran 4:30 miles in high school. At his best he was at the absolute bottom of the domestic pro scene. Around here he was pretty fast but the shorter 1-2 hour races didn't suit his training/fitness. He outrode locals mainly because he wasn't blowing up after 4 or 5 hours. In hour long races he could attack like mad and not get away. He didn't have a massive jump so it was possible to follow him, and he couldn't sustain insane speeds too long, although I certainly got ridden off his wheel more than once.

Which brings me to tactics. To be a pro you need to be pretty strong. On a relatively flat course you should be able to sustain 23-25 mph for an hour. However, once you have that strength checked off, you need also learn how to race. Learning tactics and being able to execute turns you from a strong Cat 3 into a low level pro.

Some other anecdotal bits. I think it was Roy Knickman, a massive talent back in the 80s. He did his first 10 mile time trial in sneakers and such. I think he did a 28 minute time, so about 22 mph. Within a couple weeks/races (weekly time trial) he was doing them in 22 minutes, so about 28 mph. (I've never done a 28 mph TT in my life, even with TT bike, skinsuit, disk wheel, etc.) He ended up a solid pro, better at one day races with immense strength/power. I think he averaged 30 mph for 20 km in the Junior National TT, using a 53x15 top gear (gear limit at the time).

A local Cat 1 did an FTP test at the Tuesday Night race maybe a month ago - he started the race knowing he was going to go as hard as he could for 20 minutes. One of my teammates told me they were basically going 30 mph for 20 minutes while this guy pulled. He placed 8th? at Athens Twilight Crit earlier this year, and recently got 5th in another NRC race. He's been racing a number of years but this was a breakthrough year for him.

Etc etc. Pros are just soooo strong.

That's not to say dream. Read what Lemond did when he was a Junior. He wrote down his goals and knocked them off one by one like nothing. From here.

"I made a list of goals in 1978. 4 Goals:
Junior World Championship
Olympics
World Championships at 22
And Tour de France at 25."

I did the same list for me. Mine was a bit more grounded. State RR. Enter National RR (required qualifying by placing top 6 in states back then). Do Philly (pro-am at the time, amateurs could still enter even though it was a huge, huge race). I got to halfway into the first lap of the 10 lap state RR before my dreams ended. lol.
__________________
"...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson
carpediemracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 10:35 AM   #16
caloso
Packfodding 3
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Bikes: Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
Posts: 35,170
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 675 Post(s)
Work with your coach and get a good fall/winter training plan. Even if your race season is over, make sure you keep going to the local rides that the racers ride. You can use these rides to work on bike handling and pack skills. Also to try stuff in a race-like environment: go early, go late, ride off the front, sit in, etc. Find out how ride right to the edge of blowing up and getting dropped and then claw yourself back on to the group.
caloso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 10:59 AM   #17
TheKillerPenguin
Nonsense
 
TheKillerPenguin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Vagabond
Bikes: Affirmative
Posts: 13,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 411 Post(s)
Be ready to train a lot more than you probably realize, even when your friends are doing cool things, it's below freezing outside and you just want to curl up into a ball and sleep all day. Even doing the right things is no guarantee. Basically, you better love this sport.
TheKillerPenguin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 11:42 AM   #18
hack
Senior Member
 
hack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Folsom, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 3,674
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 309 Post(s)
Read up on Michael Woods and do whatever he did.


Michael Woods: Wiggle your big toe | Cyclingnews.com
hack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-16, 08:47 PM   #19
Doge 
Senior Member
 
Doge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Southern California, USA
Bikes: 1979 Raleigh Team 753
Posts: 6,589
Mentioned: 80 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1457 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by spectastic View Post
important to ask yourself why you want to be a pro cyclist. it's a high price to pay for little extrinsic rewards.
...
Exactly.
I actually think the ONLY route to being a cycling pro making a decent living involves living and racing in Europe.
Any you may not want that.
At 18 - time to move in the next couple years if being a World tour Pro is your goal. You really won't know until that 21-23 age, but starting then is really pretty late. Keep in mind there are 18 year olds that can race well won RRs with any US pro.



My son just turned 18. Some of those he raced against and a teammate will likely be World Tour Pros. Fortunately for mom and dad, my son saw what we saw - to be a pro and enjoy the life - live and race in Europe.
He didn't want to now. And he did not see being a USA pro worth skipping college for. So, he's in college. There is no way for him he that he can do RR miles required for "real races" on the U23 UCI circuit which is where U23 kids need to be to go to the next step. He will do collegiate cycling, and likely track pursuit and we'll see what happens.
Doge is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:09 PM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION