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Old 05-01-06, 11:51 PM   #1
Snicklefritz
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TT set up

I really enjoyed my first TT last weekend and have found a few more on the calendar in my area. Last time I went with the goal of seeing what I could do, whether I like TT's at all, etc. I didn't worry at all about aero anything except perhaps for the TT helmet which I alread had.

Now I'm thinking about setting one of my bikes up for TT's but not sure what is the best approach. Here are a few options. I'd be interested in hearing peoples' opinions on what might make sense.

[edit] ok, my list was way too long

Basically I was thinking of taking one of my road bikes and converting it to a TT set up, it was just a question of which bike...

Last edited by Snicklefritz; 05-02-06 at 10:36 AM.
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Old 05-02-06, 05:17 AM   #2
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I got lost...but one piece of advice. Whatever you decide to do, you have to absolutely make sure that the aero bars are set up properly. And do NOT move the seat forward (assuming that your seat is OK now for your drops) to compensate for your more forward position in the aero bars.

Whatever bars you get, make sure that they are adjustable, fore and aft. In other words, you get an optimal body position (pedal stroke, hip bend, shoulder/chest width) in the aero bars...

You can't just slap these things on and go if your intention is to be fast.

Hope that helps...
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Old 05-02-06, 06:31 AM   #3
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Here is the best option, sell one of your road frames (keep the drive train) and buy a TT frame. I tried to do the road bike as TT bike thing and you just can't get the right fit. I spent a lot of money trying to get a road frame to be a TT frame and then just ended up buying a TT frame. TT frames are pretty inexpensive used, or if you want go new the Felt B2 is a pretty smokin deal.
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Old 05-02-06, 07:48 AM   #4
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I don't believe you're going to be able to use the wheel covers in USCF events come January.

And I'd agree on the TT frame option. Biggest advantage to a TT bike is geometry that allows you to get into the most aero position. There are some cheap options out there. You can get a Leader frame for around $350. TT frames pop up on ebay a lot too. I got a virtually new Griffen Vulcan on ebay for $695. ($3500 new). I bet you can sell the Torelli frame for not much less than you'll need to get a servicable TT frame.
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Old 05-02-06, 08:33 AM   #5
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+1 on the TT frame. If not, then go with whichever frame which has the shortest top tube for you and/or the steepest seat tube angle. Comfort wont be as important as the longest TT you are likely to do would be a 40k with most being much shorter than that. However, power output in aero position WILL be important as well as the fact that you will also lose handling ability the further forward you go on the bike. Good luck.
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Old 05-02-06, 09:49 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by merlinextraligh
I don't believe you're going to be able to use the wheel covers in USCF events come January.
More importantly, I don't think they're that great in the first place. They add weight without adding any structural purpose. I know cost is important, but if you can't afford a real disc or aero wheel, I would stick with the regular wheel while saving up.

I also agree on getting a TT frame. Sell the Torelli if you're not attached to it. I did so many TTs on a regular bike, and never got comfortable with the aero bars.
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Old 05-02-06, 10:44 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrWJODonnell
+1 on the TT frame. If not, then go with whichever frame which has the shortest top tube for you and/or the steepest seat tube angle. Comfort wont be as important as the longest TT you are likely to do would be a 40k with most being much shorter than that. However, power output in aero position WILL be important as well as the fact that you will also lose handling ability the further forward you go on the bike. Good luck.
Seems like a lot of people are suggesting a TT frame. That's a good point I hadn't thought of. With enough bikes around the house, I've got plenty of parts, so I'd really only need a frame and then the TT bars I guess (w/brakes and those other kind of shifters). So that makes me curious, are there rules of thumb for how much better performance (ie power output/speed) you can expect to get from a full TT set up vs. trying to do it on your road bike? I'm wondering if maybe I have the cart before the horse and should ask how much time one could expect to gain or whatever before I decide whether or not to invest the time/money
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Old 05-02-06, 10:58 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snicklefritz
Seems like a lot of people are suggesting a TT frame. That's a good point I hadn't thought of. With enough bikes around the house, I've got plenty of parts, so I'd really only need a frame and then the TT bars I guess (w/brakes and those other kind of shifters). So that makes me curious, are there rules of thumb for how much better performance (ie power output/speed) you can expect to get from a full TT set up vs. trying to do it on your road bike? I'm wondering if maybe I have the cart before the horse and should ask how much time one could expect to gain or whatever before I decide whether or not to invest the time/money

I saw a 15% difference in the PT numbers between the road framed TT setup and the propper TT frame set up. What kept happening in the road set up was I would end up sliding so far forward as I got into the workout that it became painfull and my numbers would drop. With the TT bike I'm engaging all the right musceles as well as a more aero position. I'm more comfortable in all aspects and therefore making more power longer. Also TT frames are just plain stiff, they don't care about compliance as much as road frames because you are on them for such short periods of time. Then of course there is the zoot factor...TT bikes just look f'n cool!
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Old 05-02-06, 11:07 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by El Diablo Rojo
I saw a 15% difference in the PT numbers between the road framed TT setup and the propper TT frame set up. What kept happening in the road set up was I would end up sliding so far forward as I got into the workout that it became painfull and my numbers would drop. With the TT bike I'm engaging all the right musceles as well as a more aero position. I'm more comfortable in all aspects and therefore making more power longer. Also TT frames are just plain stiff, they don't care about compliance as much as road frames because you are on them for such short periods of time. Then of course there is the zoot factor...TT bikes just look f'n cool!
so I can look good even if I'm DFL...(dead freakin' last). Actually in TT's that hasn't happened even when I am freakin' tired. Not so for crits...

Anyway, the problem I'm probably going to have with TT frames is that at 5'3", there probably won't be many choices. My Ruby as a SA of 76 degree and a top tube of 50.6cm. That allows me to use a normal length stem and still have a good reach. I'm concerned that when SA gets up to 78 or so that I may
have a hard time finding a frame with a short enough top tube to get a good reach without using a stubby stem. Any thoughts on what frames to look at?
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Old 05-02-06, 11:15 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snicklefritz
so I can look good even if I'm DFL...(dead freakin' last). Actually in TT's that hasn't happened even when I am freakin' tired. Not so for crits...

Anyway, the problem I'm probably going to have with TT frames is that at 5'3", there probably won't be many choices. My Ruby as a SA of 76 degree and a top tube of 50.6cm. That allows me to use a normal length stem and still have a good reach. I'm concerned that when SA gets up to 78 or so that I may
have a hard time finding a frame with a short enough top tube to get a good reach without using a stubby stem. Any thoughts on what frames to look at?
Depending on what kind of cash you want to expend, the inexpensive side (note I didn't say cheap) Leader makes a descent frame and they are under 400 new. Leaders do have an inherent problem with the fd mounts and they sometimes have trouble dropping chains. Now on the more upscale side the Cervlos P2's and P3's are very nice proven TT bikes (P3 carbon is pure sex). C'dale is releasing a new TT frame based on the Six13 material construction and I've seen the frame and it's dead sexy. The new Orbea is a pretty sweet ride as well. Still the best deal for a complete bike has to be the Felt B2. DA 10s with Zipp 404's for about $3,500 retail.
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Old 05-02-06, 02:48 PM   #11
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Yeah! Go with the P3C to look like me! Wait, you couldn't get that ugly. Oh well.
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Old 05-02-06, 09:01 PM   #12
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Alright to calm down this cash covered crowd, its not the TT frame that's totally needed its simply getting into the right position, and without a TT frame that can be hard, but its doable. I've seen guys from MIT on road frames and quite good aero positions (or at least that's what the head of the wind tunnel says...I won't argue).
I've also had good results with wheel covers, and now that I have a powertap it should make a pretty good set up.
If you intend to be serious (and that's a totally subjective thing - I'm nearly a 2 and still don't think about it too much) then it could be worth it, but I think for a lot of people TT bikes are just cool...and do jack.
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