Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Race management software

    Does anyone know of any good race management software? Yes, I know putting up an Excel sheet of the results is fine for what a lot of people want, but I'm hoping for a bit more --- ability to track people over multiple races, show team stats, etc etc. Ideally, web based.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    776
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    During my years, there have been about 10-12 different commercial tries at it, all which ended in failure. I'd suggest Access or FileMaker. Both have nice interfaces with back ends that are webbable.

  3. #3
    Geosynchronous Falconeer recursive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    My Bikes
    2006 Raleigh Rush Hour, Campy Habanero Team Ti, Soma Double Cross
    Posts
    6,312
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Google spreadsheets?
    Bring the pain.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    My Bikes
    2006 Lemond Etape 105/Tiagra
    Posts
    751
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are comfortable with even the most basic web-programming concepts you could have yourself a Rails application in minutes - coding in Ruby is a delight and creating Rails applications is a snap. However getting it reliably hosted and deployed takes a little more know-how. Depends on what your ultimate goal is.

    Otherwise stick with Access and Filemaker as ri_us suggested. Longterm they suck, but they'll more than do the trick for now and will be much better than any spreadsheet.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,965
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffremer
    If you are comfortable with even the most basic web-programming concepts you could have yourself a Rails application in minutes - coding in Ruby is a delight and creating Rails applications is a snap. However getting it reliably hosted and deployed takes a little more know-how. Depends on what your ultimate goal is.
    I'm actually working on exactly that for track race management. It's more complicated than road, because most things are run as omniums and many races are decided on points from multiple separate sprints within the race.

    Putting together a road race management thing would probably be pretty straightforward, and you could always host it locally using one of the drag and drop RoR installs. Locomotive on the mac worked straight out of the box, and when I followed the directions in the RoR book from pragmatic, the cmd line install worked right off the bat, too. Since network connections to the outside are likely to be flaky, you're probably better off hosting it locally and running your own isolated LAN onsite if you want multiple race reg computers anyway.

    And I concur that RoR is a breeze compared to most anything else.
    Track - the other off-road
    http://www.lavelodrome.org

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    My Bikes
    2006 Lemond Etape 105/Tiagra
    Posts
    751
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bitingduck
    I'm actually working on exactly that for track race management. It's more complicated than road, because most things are run as omniums and many races are decided on points from multiple separate sprints within the race.

    Putting together a road race management thing would probably be pretty straightforward, and you could always host it locally using one of the drag and drop RoR installs. Locomotive on the mac worked straight out of the box, and when I followed the directions in the RoR book from pragmatic, the cmd line install worked right off the bat, too. Since network connections to the outside are likely to be flaky, you're probably better off hosting it locally and running your own isolated LAN onsite if you want multiple race reg computers anyway.

    And I concur that RoR is a breeze compared to most anything else.
    That's fantastic. Rails rocks. Since learning Ruby I've almost completely forgone PHP/MySQL for Rails over Postresql or more often MySQL. I've been toying with writing up my own little training management software with a Rails backend and an XUL front end. I'm tired of RouteSlip because it is so slow/flaky. BikeJournal is alright for tracking rides etc, but it's not as slick as I'd like and doesn't do it's own maps. Wish I had the time, but I'll try taking it a piece at a time - putting together the Rails end for training data will be a snap, getting it chromed would probably be next. It'd be awesome to do a native XPCOM wrapper for getting it to talk to Google Earth, but in the mean time I'd probably just do a RouteSlip/Bikely clone. Anyone know what Toporoute does for routing the polylines on roads?

    As far as hosting, I've got my own little Capistrano/Rake deployment recipe that works very smoothly, unfortunately it's pretty specific to my server setup. Again Rails rocks, but getting rails applications live and into production presents a significant task to people who don't do this kind of thing regularly (at least compared to how easy it is to create little toy Rails applications).

  7. #7
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,965
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been learning/using Perl because there were some nice CPAN modules that I wanted to use for another project, but the frameworks and CMS's for perl aren't quite there. Catalyst is almost there, and works, but installing the scaffolding module was a major pain (and still hasn't quite installed). The scaffolding in RoR works straight out of the box, and Ruby is fairly easy to understand without having read anything about it. The OO stuff in perl is ok, but it's easy to get your brain turned inside out when stuff is part OO, part procedural.

    My hosting service (Hub.org) has at least a few people running RoR, but I'm not quite sure of their setups. It's all virtual machines rather than hosts, so you can run anything you want, in any version. They also support Pgsql. I'm planning to run on my local machine for a while, and then host it remotely once it's well behaved.
    Track - the other off-road
    http://www.lavelodrome.org

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    My Bikes
    2006 Lemond Etape 105/Tiagra
    Posts
    751
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bitingduck
    ...but the frameworks and CMS's for perl aren't quite there.
    Perl is a lot of fun, but in my opinion Perl has long since come and gone as far as web use is concerned. Perl is much more suited for what it was designed for. I use a mix of bash, Perl, and Ruby for my own local utility scripts.

  9. #9
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I'm actually well versed in Perl / PHP / SQL and the like (not to mention old standbys like C and C++!), and even some .NET fun. But with all things, writting zillions of views on top of a DB is annoying, and I was hoping somebody else had done that for me.

    BTW, Access / Excel / etc. are kinda OK, but once you get into stage races / omniums and the like they break down pretty quickly from what I can see. Sometimes, you really do just want a relational table (and yeah, I know Access kinda does it, but really, it doesn't.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •