Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

"The 33"-Road Bike Racing We set this forum up for our members to discuss their experiences in either pro or amateur racing, whether they are the big races, or even the small backyard races. Don't forget to update all the members with your own race results.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-16-03, 04:42 PM   #1
rgaldes
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What type of frame material do you prefer and why?

I am starting to look at new or slightly used frames to build up a race bike on. I just wanted to hear what people were using and why they like or dislike it. What would you buy carbon fiber, alum, steel, Ti, or some type of hybrid. Any thoughs on moans and groans will be great.
Thanks
rgaldes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-03, 04:53 PM   #2
khuon
DEADBEEF
 
khuon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Catching his breath alongside a road near Seattle, WA USA
Bikes: 1999 K2 OzM, 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte
Posts: 12,242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh-oh... another frame material thread. Although materials do make a difference, there are [1] many different subspecies of each type of material which can muddy the disinctions and [2] designs which can make one material feel like another. I think that the frame design itself and manufacturing process used to create it contribute more to the feel and performance of the bike than the base material. I also think another big factour is the wheels.
__________________
1999 K2 OzM 2001 Aegis Aro Svelte
"Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send." -- Jon Postel, RFC1122
khuon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-03, 05:57 PM   #3
rgaldes
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Good point about the wheels A great frame roll as smooth as the wheels will carry it. I guess what I am after is what will you get from lets say an good alum frame vs a good Ti frame. Is Ti going to be a more smooth ride while Alum more rigid and responsive?
rgaldes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-03, 11:44 AM   #4
Flaneur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 691
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Go ride some bikes.....

you can't beat actually riding the bikes you like the look of, preferably on similar roads and at equivalent price points. My idea of a harsh or compliant ride may bear little resemblance to yours, likewise, handling, climbing, etc. Your weight, riding style and preferred equipment will all factor in as well.....

If you're in the slightly used market, look out for signs of crash damage/repair.

Like Khuon, I am a bit wary of going into the whole frame material debate (yet) again. Ride some bikes- and buy the one you go back to and want to ride all day!
Flaneur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-03, 08:37 AM   #5
BikeInMN
Dude who rides bike
 
BikeInMN's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: U S of A
Bikes:
Posts: 642
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Maybe not the answer you're looking for but...

Race frame = light, cheap and stiff or in other words aluminum. For me comfort isn't a selling point for a race frame but I will say that I have no problems getting comfy on aluminum.

Lots of guys like Cannondale CAAD 3/4/5/6 models for the high bottom bracket. They give you a bit more clearance to pedal through corners, which is nice for criterium racing. I raced a CAAD4 two years ago and really liked it. Cannondale frames are also pretty cheap if you shop around. A CAAD5 with full carbon fork can be had new for around 750 USD.

I'm currently racing a 59cm Bianchi EV2 that is really light and stiff enough for my needs. I'm also a huge fan of Bianchi geometry and handling. It just feels right to me. My mid season race weight at 6'1" is around 155-158 so I'm not super hard on frames and can get by on pretty light weight stuff that bigger guys would crush like a soda can.

If you were new to racing, I wouldn't recommend sinking huge money into a race frame as you have a pretty good chance of crashing it. Not that it'd be totally trashed but it would hurt more to trash a really nice Ti or CF frame IMO.
BikeInMN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-03, 02:27 PM   #6
djgustashaw
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Georgia
Bikes:
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i prefer carbon. if designed correctly, it can yield a soft ride, great stiffness, and feather-light weight. to me, it's just the most versatile material out there. and if you take good care of it, it should last you as long as any metal frame.
djgustashaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-03, 08:28 PM   #7
don d.
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
If I were you, I'd go down to your local Nascar feeder round dirt track and watch the stock cars race around, then go into the pit area and see how the cars look after the race. This is how your bike is going to eventually look IF YOU'RE REALLY GOING TO RACE! The point is that if you really want to race, buy a rock um', sock um' racing frame that will take some abuse and get you through the season or that at least has a good warranty to cover you through a couple of seasons of racing.

If you want a "racing" bike to ride on parade at the local club ride, then buy something that has words like "lightest frame in existence" in the ads, or "manufactured out of the newest latest Scamdium tubing-so light we had to tie it down to take these photos".

Most manufacturers make a durable aluminum racing frame, usually weighing ~3.5lbs(1.6kgs), frame only, that would be ideal for a solid racing frame. These are usually made out of 7005 aluminum or 7020 aluminum. Dedacciai 7005 aluminum is a solid tubeset for a solid alu racer. Check out web sites for ALAN, Coppi, Basso, DeRosa.

Steel racing frames by Bianchi, Coppi, Basso, Tommasini, Colnago, Rex, and Lemond are also good solid racers, albeit slightly heavier, with the advantage that you may be able to straighten a steel frame after a crash(important to the racer on a budget).

Ti has a reputation for being more durable in crashes, the least likely material to bend/go out of alignment, etc... so the premium you pay for an all ti frame may be worth it, but you can still find an all ti frame for ~$1000.00. See Colorado Cyclist Douglas Ti frames or Tommaso Ti bikes for $1500 or Airborne Ti frames for ~$1000.00.

Please let us know what turns out to be the best frame material for you.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-21-03, 08:56 PM   #8
don d.
Guest
 
Bikes:
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Just read the "Cat 5 Racing" thread. You must read this b4 buying a frame.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-03, 06:59 AM   #9
RiPHRaPH
Don't Believe the Hype
 
RiPHRaPH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: chicagoland area
Bikes: 1999 Steelman SR525, 2002 Lightspeed Ultimate, 1988 Trek 830, 2008 Scott Addict
Posts: 2,628
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
is this thread about the best material irregardless of price?
RiPHRaPH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-03, 04:31 PM   #10
Jason T. Martin
Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Austin, Texas
Bikes:
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
CARBON
Jason T. Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:50 AM.