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  1. #1
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    Will sweating prevent me from racing?

    Right now I am a recreational rider, but want to take the next step into racing. I plan on joining a bunch of group rides until I feel comfortable enough to enter a race. One of my main concerns is that I have what would almost be considered a sweating dysfunction. I have never met anyone anywhere that sweats as much as I do. On a warm day I can go through close to 5 liters of water on a 40 mile ride. On a hot, humid day, 5 liters is not enough. I teach a one hour spin class once a week. I drink a liter and a half during the class and close to a liter right after, and I still will be down up to 5 or 6 pounds of water weight. This poses several problems; I get dehydrated very easily obviously and I lose huge amounts of electrolytes which can lead to easy cramping. Will this prevent me from racing? Is there something I can do help the problem? My fear is that I will run out of water during a race and have to stop as this has happened to me on solo rides.

  2. #2
    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    Many of the CAT 5 races are not very long. Crits are so intense that you may not get many chances to drink, especially if everyone is packed together like sardines. Road races will have more chances to drink, but the race will probably be only an hour or so long.

    Imho, drink something with electrolyte replacement as drinks with salts stay in you better than plain water.
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoRacer View Post
    Imho, drink something with electrolyte replacement as drinks with salts stay in you better than plain water.
    Water with electrolytes will empty from the stomach faster than plain water. Once absorbed, I don't see how the original source of water or electrolytes will affect how fast they are expelled.

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    Have you checked with a doctor? Thats a sign of being diabetic.

  5. #5
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    In 45 min crit your water losses probably aren't going to have any effect whatsoever on your performance.

    prob a good idea to get to your GP though, might be a real issue
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  6. #6
    Burning Matches. ElJamoquio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sactown View Post
    Right now I am a recreational rider, but want to take the next step into racing. I plan on joining a bunch of group rides until I feel comfortable enough to enter a race. One of my main concerns is that I have what would almost be considered a sweating dysfunction. I have never met anyone anywhere that sweats as much as I do. On a warm day I can go through close to 5 liters of water on a 40 mile ride. On a hot, humid day, 5 liters is not enough. I teach a one hour spin class once a week. I drink a liter and a half during the class and close to a liter right after, and I still will be down up to 5 or 6 pounds of water weight. This poses several problems; I get dehydrated very easily obviously and I lose huge amounts of electrolytes which can lead to easy cramping. Will this prevent me from racing? Is there something I can do help the problem? My fear is that I will run out of water during a race and have to stop as this has happened to me on solo rides.
    I go through maybe 70% as much water as you do outside, inside, though, I don't; perhaps you need more air movement?

    In any case it's never hampered me from racing - most races I still end up with water when I finish. Make sure you're hydrated when you start.
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  7. #7
    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    I stand corrected according to this abstract that states the effect of overdrinking water-electrolyte solutions results in a transient expansion of water that is rapidly excreted.


    But...
    Evidence has accrued that greater fluid retention can be achieved with an aqueous solution containing glycerol. Riedesel et al were the first to report that after hyperhydration with a glycerol solution, subjects excreted significantly less of the water load than did those consuming water alone.

    Reference: http://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/full/72/2/564S
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

  8. #8
    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    Then there is this:

    ACSM Position Stand: Exercise and Fluid Replacement.
    ACSM Position Stand
    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 28(10):i-ix, October 1996.
    Convertino, Victor A. Ph.D., FACSM, (Chair); Armstrong, Lawrence E. Ph.D., FACSM; Coyle, Edward F. Ph.D., FACSM; Mack, Gary W. Ph.D; Sawka, Michael N. Ph.D., FACSM; Senay, Leo C. Jr. Ph.D., FACSM; Sherman, W. Michael Ph.D., FACSM

    Abstract:
    SUMMARY: It is the position of the American College of Sports Medicine that adequate fluid replacement helps maintain hydration and, therefore, promotes the health, safety, and optimal physical performance of individuals participating in regular physical activity. This position statement is based on a comprehensive review and interpretation of scientific literature concerning the influence of fluid replacement on exercise performance and the risk of thermal injury associated with dehydration and hyperthermia. Based on available evidence, the American College of Sports Medicine makes the following general recommendations on the amount and composition of fluid that should be ingested in preparation for, during, and after exercise or athletic competition:


    1. It is recommended that individuals consume a nutritionally balanced diet and drink adequate fluids during the 24-h period before an event, especially during the period that includes the meal prior to exercise, to promote proper hydration before exercise or competition.

    2. It is recommended that individuals drink about 500 ml (about 17 ounces) of fluid about 2 h before exercise to promote adequate hydration and allow time for excretion of excess ingested water.

    3. During exercise, athletes should start drinking early and at regular intervals in an attempt to consume fluids at a rate sufficient to replace all the water lost through sweating (i.e., body weight loss), or consume the maximal amount that can be tolerated.

    4. It is recommended that ingested fluids be cooler than ambient temperature[between 15[degrees] and 22[degrees]C (59[degrees] and 72[degrees]F)] and flavored to enhance palatability and promote fluid replacement. Fluids should be readily available and served in containers that allow adequate volumes to be ingested with ease and with minimal interruption of exercise.

    5. Addition of proper amounts of carbohydrates and/or electrolytes to a fluid replacement solution is recommended for exercise events of duration greater than 1 h since it does not significantly impair water delivery to the body and may enhance performance. During exercise lasting less than 1 h, there is little evidence of physiological or physical performance differences between consuming a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink and plain water.

    6. During intense exercise lasting longer than 1 h, it is recommended that carbohydrates be ingested at a rate of 30-60 g [middle dot] h-1 to maintain oxidation of carbohydrates and delay fatigue. This rate of carbohydrate intake can be achieved without compromising fluid delivery by drinking 600-1200 ml[middle dot] h-1 of solutions containing 4%-8% carbohydrates (g [middle dot] 100 ml-1). The carbohydrates can be sugars (glucose or sucrose) or starch (e.g., maltodextrin).

    7. Inclusion of sodium (0.5-0.7 g [middle dot] 1-1 of water) in the rehydration solution ingested during exercise lasting longer than 1 h is recommended since it may be advantageous in enhancing palatability, promoting fluid retention, and possibly preventing hyponatremia in certain individuals who drink excessive quantities of fluid. There is little physiological basis for the presence of sodium in an oral rehydration solution for enhancing intestinal water absorption as long as sodium is sufficiently available from the previous meal.

    (C) Williams & Wilkins 1996. All Rights Reserved.

    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

  9. #9
    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wfrogge View Post
    Have you checked with a doctor? Thats a sign of being diabetic.
    Not necessarily. If he were en route to being diabetic he probably wouldn't have the energy for the bike. Those kind of DKA symptoms would have already landed him in the hospital and he would not even consider racing. I withered away very quickly once DKA set in.

    But to be sure: OP, how is your energy level? How about fatigue? Any vision concerns? Weight loss over the last few months? If any of these are a problem, consult your doctor immediately.

  10. #10
    Splicer of Molecules Nickel's Avatar
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    Do you drink a lot before you ride? I have a similar issue and have worn a camelbak.

  11. #11
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slim_77 View Post
    Not necessarily. If he were en route to being diabetic he probably wouldn't have the energy for the bike. Those kind of DKA symptoms would have already landed him in the hospital and he would not even consider racing. I withered away very quickly once DKA set in.

    But to be sure: OP, how is your energy level? How about fatigue? Any vision concerns? Weight loss over the last few months? If any of these are a problem, consult your doctor immediately.
    He would be urinating excessively if he were diabetic.
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  12. #12
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    just when you think you've seen every question about being ready to enter a race ...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wfrogge View Post
    Have you checked with a doctor? Thats a sign of being diabetic.
    Im actually a second year medical student and my dad is an ER physician. I am pretty sure that I dont have anything physiologically wrong with me. I try to drink at least half Gatorade for a number of reasons. One is that in the small intestine there is a glucose/water cotransporter that enhances the absorption of water in the presence of glucose. Second, adding electrolytes should help fluid retention in that it increases the salt concentration in the blood. When the salt concentration is higher in the blood, more water is reabsorbed in the kidney in an attempt to maintain homeostasis.

    I think that I could get by in a 45 to 1 hour race, but my concern is with those that are longer than that. There is a 100 mile race in the area that I live that I want to attempt, and its rides like that that have me worried. I do hydrate heavily before I begin riding, but the water is lost incredibly quickly.

  14. #14
    Senior Member jkizzle's Avatar
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    just use a camelback and bottles if need be

  15. #15
    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    What 100 mile race? Races that long that allow cat 5s are rare.

    See what happens in shorter races. You can also do century rides to simulate the length and time in the saddle of the long race. Just keep track of your fluid/food intake. It's harder to get food and fluids during a race of course since few races have aid stations and you generally don't want to stop anyhow. You'll need to factor that in to your race plan, and if you don't already have someone, cultivate a family member so you'll have someone to give you handups.

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    This is the specific race that I am referring to

    http://www.rougeroubaix.com/

    Does anyone here carry extra bottles in their jersey pockets? I tried riding yesterday with 2 bottles in my back pockets and it seems to work pretty well. I think I could withstand at least 30 miles with 4 bottles.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sactown View Post
    This is the specific race that I am referring to

    http://www.rougeroubaix.com/

    Does anyone here carry extra bottles in their jersey pockets? I tried riding yesterday with 2 bottles in my back pockets and it seems to work pretty well. I think I could withstand at least 30 miles with 4 bottles.
    Races in Texas in the summer usually require bottles in the jersey pockets. It's very common. I usually go with 1 24oz in the jersey and 2 on the bike for RR.
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  18. #18
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    there's also the option to rely on neutral water, or friends to give you water in the feed zone.

    I did a lot of racing this year in Northern Cal, and only 1 race was without neutral water.

    Edit, that's not true, there were lots of crits without neutral water, but I didn't even drink my own bottles, let alone want/need more. Most crits at the 4/5 level are 30 minutes long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sactown View Post
    This is the specific race that I am referring to

    http://www.rougeroubaix.com/

    Does anyone here carry extra bottles in their jersey pockets? I tried riding yesterday with 2 bottles in my back pockets and it seems to work pretty well. I think I could withstand at least 30 miles with 4 bottles.
    Even though thats labeld as a race its more of a fast ride for the B group (where you and ill be). I really wouldnt suggest this race as your first one though... theres 30 miles of gravel roads and from what I understand the gravel roads are in better shape than the paved sections.

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    Do you suggest not attempting that race because of the length, or because of the difficult terrain?

  21. #21
    Senior Member Snicklefritz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericm979 View Post
    What 100 mile race? Races that long that allow cat 5s are rare.

    See what happens in shorter races. You can also do century rides to simulate the length and time in the saddle of the long race. Just keep track of your fluid/food intake. It's harder to get food and fluids during a race of course since few races have aid stations and you generally don't want to stop anyhow. You'll need to factor that in to your race plan, and if you don't already have someone, cultivate a family member so you'll have someone to give you handups.

    for something even longer, try LOTOJA! It's 206 miles and has CAT5 through CAT1/2 groups. I think most years they have multiple CAT5 fields.

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    Senior Member ericm979's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sactown View Post
    Do you suggest not attempting that race because of the length, or because of the difficult terrain?
    You should do it. There's nothing like an epic race to encourage one to work hard. But you'll do better if you work up to it by doing shorter races and hard century rides. The shorter races will teach you pack positioning (something I am sorely lacking so I know what it is like to suck at it) and get you used to the intensity when the hammer's down. It sounds like this race doesn't have any serious climbs but there'll be a premium to being in the front when you get to the gravel sections, so good position would be important. The centuries will get you used to the distance and help you figure out your water (and food) intake strategies. Maybe throw some gravel road riding in there too. Doing whatever you can to learn what you need ahead of time can only help.

  23. #23
    Burning Matches. ElJamoquio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianappleby View Post
    there's also the option to rely on neutral water,
    I've never been at a race with neutral water. Might be a regional thing.
    Reacting is mind candy; it requires no thought. Thinking is tedious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianappleby View Post
    there's also the option to rely on neutral water, or friends to give you water in the feed zone.

    I did a lot of racing this year in Northern Cal, and only 1 race was without neutral water.

    Edit, that's not true, there were lots of crits without neutral water, but I didn't even drink my own bottles, let alone want/need more. Most crits at the 4/5 level are 30 minutes long.
    There is no feeding/water bottle handup during a crit.

    MABRA is fortunate to have a local bottled water company that provides neutral water to most of the district road races - here's the plug:

    www.drinkmorewater.com

    While I generally carry up to 5 bottles on a hot summer day (I'd rather carry the xtra weight than risk missing a hand up when I really need it), when in dire need, I've also just grabbed a bottle on occaission.

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