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  1. #1
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    Teach me about sprinting

    I got second place in our first thursday night training series race. I would describe the course as "rolling", but I'm a flatlander, so others may not think of it that way.

    Anyway, the race came down to a bunch sprint. The finish was on a slight uphill. I had picked out the wheel that I knew would be challenging me for the sprint, and decided to wait until he went, with the intention of letting him lead me out. Unfortunately, he went earlier than I expected, I got slightly boxed in, and I couldn't catch him. It seemed like it took forever for me to wind up my sprint, but once I got going it was like a freight train . He petered out a little bit at the end, but I still ended up about 5 feet behind him.

    After the race, I told him that I wasn't expecting him to go so early. He guessed he went with about 400-500m to go, and that he thought it was a good distance for the final push.

    All of this leaves me with some questions:

    1. How far away from the finish should you start sprinting. I realize that this may changed based on terrain, etc, but what are the general rules of thumb?
    2. Is it better to wait for someone else to attack first, or should I initiate and try to catch everyone off guard? Basically, how do you time your sprint?
    3. What kind of training can I do to improve my "jump"? I need to be able to accelerate a lot quicker to be able to react to these kind of moves. (this will also help with attacking to create a break)

    Any links or suggestions on reading material are appreciated also.

  2. #2
    Making a kilometer blurry waterrockets's Avatar
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    Congrats on the 2nd place!

    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    1. How far away from the finish should you start sprinting. I realize that this may changed based on terrain, etc, but what are the general rules of thumb?
    It depends on the sprinter too. My 5s power is my strength, so I wait as long as I can. Sometimes, going early, getting the gap, then fading is the way to do it. If you catch people off-guard, you might have 1 second where nobody responds, and that can be enough of an advantage.

    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    2. Is it better to wait for someone else to attack first, or should I initiate and try to catch everyone off guard? Basically, how do you time your sprint?
    That's something you're going to need to develop for yourself. Try it different ways. See how it works out when different guys are up front. It depends on you, them, how hard the race was to that point, all that stuff. If you're really explosive in a sprint, you'll generally do better to wait and come out of nowhere from 75m. If you're more like Boonen, then 200m is a good launch point (even though he can go for longer, 200m is really long for an amateur all-out sprint).

    It's important not to treat training races like a race. They are a unique opportunity to try something different with very low risk (you're not losing entry fees, and nobody is going to get upgrade points that you should have had). So, you have to utilize these opportunities to try something that you haven't tried before to see how it works. It's a rolling bike racing laboratory -- design experiments, formulate hypotheses, and run the tests.

    There's a guy at our Tuesday Nighter who always rides in the B group. Never works once during the entire thing. He's not a bad sprinter, so he wins sometimes, arms in the air. When he loses, he pounds his bars like he lost his one shot at a Tour stage. This is not how you do training races. The times he's beaten me are because I'm trying something new, like solo breakaways, and I'm learning something. In a real race, I'd destroy him, but I don't let that get in the way of training. Besides, I'm in the A race 95% of the time, taking risks -- I just come back to the Bs to work on real limiters.

    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    3. What kind of training can I do to improve my "jump"? I need to be able to accelerate a lot quicker to be able to react to these kind of moves. (this will also help with attacking to create a break)
    Sprints. Standing starts in a big gear, drag races from 100 rpm and 20mph, leadouts with friends, training races, downhill high-cadence (200+rpm) sprints.

    Also, 1m intervals. WRI™ are a good profile because they develop solid neuromuscular stimuli at the start, then anaerobic work capacity by trying to stay on it until 60 seconds.

    You may not get huge gains in your raw sprint power, but you'll get some, and you'll get used to sprinting.

    One of the most important aspects is to get REALLY aero when you're sprinting. Hands in the drops, elbows bent deep, looking up the road a bit (don't push your helmet through the air top-first).

    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    Any links or suggestions on reading material are appreciated also.
    Carpediemracing has some brilliant posts and blogs on sprinting. He's probably forgotten more about sprinting than I'll ever know. I'm sure he'll pop in with some links, but this should get you started:
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...sprinting.html
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...-leadouts.html
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...-sprinter.html
    Last edited by waterrockets; 04-18-08 at 07:13 AM.

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    A few analytical notes:

    -I'll bet you were in too big a gear when you went to jump, and couldnt get revved up.
    -boxed in = out of position. happens to everyone, but it's a positioning issue, also sometimes a nerves issue, which is another matter altogether.

    1) How far from the finish should you start sprinting - too variable to answer, but generally, for me, my sprint is 150M to 200M - max. Beyond that, I'm cooked. I like to do a few warm up laps on a race course, or look at the finish if possible and try and find out when I'm between 40 and 50 pedal down strokes (l and r side) from the finish line and that's where I know my green light zone is.

    2) depends, both work depending on situation, but ideally it partially depends on your answer to your question #1. I try to time my sprint distance as above, but it almost always comes down to feel. For me, when in a sprint, I talk myself into waiting as long as I can.

    3) How to improve your jump (many variations on all of these and I dont know if any of these actually work, but worth a try):
    -spinups: 30"on/30"off or more off, do seated, 1st 10 sec. get up to high rpm, 2nd 10" higher rpm, 3rd 10" as fast as you can turn 'em without getting bouncy
    -microintervals: 15"on/15" off for 5' or 10' or etc.
    -jumps: 10" - 15" all out efforts in a ride, with full recovery, 5' or so
    -full on sprints: better done with others to lead out and discovery things about your sprint such as it's length, speed, etc. and more challenging than by yourself
    -form sprints: high speed lower gear sprints focusing on technique
    -power starts and stomps - see CTS training for definitions

    mostly, it's a bunch of trial and error.

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    Oh The Huge Manatee Lithuania's Avatar
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    i need some serious work on sprinting. unfortunately, i can read all this **** on the internet about it but unless i get some real experience with it nothing is going to change.

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    Lith - you dominate when the finish line is determined by where the last person sprinting stops

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    Oh The Huge Manatee Lithuania's Avatar
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    i only dominate at not having a clue on whats going on around me

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    as far a where to sprint from it depends on your strengths, if your a big powerful dude sprinting from 200 meters by getting out of the saddle for that quick acceleration to get your gap then just drilling it for the rest of the time is a good option. A teammate of mine who is an awesome sprinter can sprint from 250 meters to go, he can put out 1500 watts for 5s to get that gap then will either sit down or keep it out of the saddle to hold that speed, on a flat course with a leadout he can sprint at 40mph.

    Me personally where I'm not a sprinter I can pip one or two people at the line but I'm not going to win that drag race. I usually sit on someones wheel with 100-50 meters to go then put in that final acceleration.
    Cat 1 o-meter 33%

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    Quote Originally Posted by waterrockets View Post
    Standing starts in a big gear, drag races from 100 rpm and 20mph, leadouts with friends, training races, downhill high-cadence (200+rpm) sprints.
    Sounds like I need to do some higher rpm work. I generally spin pretty fast while riding (usually around 100-105 rpm), but I guess I need to work on just spinning the gear faster on the sprint instead of just pushing a bigger gear. I just get caught up the feeling of "yay, I'm pushing a big gear and sprinting", and sometimes I realize that I'm not spinning as much as I probably should be.

    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post
    -I'll bet you were in too big a gear when you went to jump, and couldnt get revved up.
    -boxed in = out of position. happens to everyone, but it's a positioning issue, also sometimes a nerves issue, which is another matter altogether.
    Another vote for a gearing issue. As far as being boxed in, I'll try to draw a picture:

    Code:
          
                {leadout guy**
                 {fast guy**
     {other guy1** {me**
                        {other guy2**
    I was right behind the fast guy, since I knew he would be going where I wanted to be. He ended up going left around the leadout guy, and I followed him left, but I had to make sure I avoided "other guy1". by the time I got around, fast guy was already up the road a bit. I could have gone right around the leadout guy, but that meant that I would be out in the wind for a few seconds before I could (theoretically) get on fast guy's wheel, since I'd have to cut to the left in front of the leadout. Now that I think about it, fast guy set his sprint up perfectly, as far as blocking me out.

    What would you have done in this situation?
    Last edited by lightbulb; 04-18-08 at 08:35 AM.

  9. #9
    Aut Vincere Aut Mori Snuffleupagus's Avatar
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    You're right on with the RPM issue. I'm a bigger guy, and I'd always done better in 400 meter drag races because I just assumed I should be sprinting from my 12 or 13.

    Now, despite putting out ~100-150 watts less due to knee surgery crap, I sprint better simply due to figuring out that I should be spinning up my 15-17 depending on the nature of the sprint. Try jumping on a little gear, hard and shifting up through the sprint as your speed increases.

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    Sprint distance - I read somewhere that a rider can to 20 revolutions all out. I used to go to courses and ride backwards from the line in a gear I thought I'd use in the sprint. If I had a lot of time, I'd ride backwards in 2 or 3 gears. Count 20 revs, look for a landmark. I've done most of the races for so long I no longer have to do that.

    Then one year I watched a whole boatload of Tour sprint finishes just before a target race (to sprint like a pro, observe them, that's my motto). I realized most of them went much, much shorter in the sprints, like under 15 revs. So I readjusted my landmark to 15 revs (felt uncomfortable doing 8 revs - seemed too short) and although I didn't win, I did fine.

    A notable exception is the Champs sprint in the Tour - they always go over 20 revs. It might be downhill or something, seems like the jump is not as important as the sprint itself.

    Jump/Lead Out or follow? This is dependent on your jump.

    If headwind, you ALWAYS follow until whenever you think is way too close, then you jump. In a slow uphill sprint (33 mph) I waited until 50 meters to jump and won by a decent margin (I posted some pics in the suffering pics thread). Guys just wither in the wind.

    Tailwind, try to leadout if you don't have a decent jump. If you have a decent jump and you can go quite fast before using it, follow. The first jumper has the advantage because they have less of a chance of blowing up and the draft is not as significant, esp if the jump pulls you clear. In tailwind sprints I've led out from as far as 300-400 meters on very fast slight uphill sprints (Gimbles, 120 sprint, 42-46 mph top speed, go almost right after the exit ramp lanes after the bridge).

    How to improve jump - pick better parents. From my experience, it's about 95% genetics. I never trained for sprinting but when I was 17 I couldn't bench 100 pounds (I weighed 103 to be fair) but when asked to do a test jump at a club ride/clinic, I could go from a standing start in one gear to 42 mph. I couldn't climb nor TT but I dreamed that I could. After that clinic (no one else broke 40 mph) I became a designated sprinter. It took some convincing that I could sprint but after I won a few field sprints, I was convinced.

    Failing that, there are a lot of guys who sprint incorrectly and therefore don't use all their jump. Jump, in my definition, is sort of like a combination of peak and 5 second power. If you have an awesome jump, you can gap virtually anyone 10-15 feet in two downstrokes, maybe even just one, so it'll barely register in 1s peak. Within 3 pedal strokes you will be 20 feet clear and going away. It usually takes 50-150 meters for non-jump type sprinters to catch up to a jump type sprinter after a jump.

    1. Learn to shift while under 100% load. I usually shift on the downstroke when I jump. In other words I slam the pedals down as I shift one gear higher. At Bethel, a sprint that normally starts flatter, goes up hill, then flattens out, I'll sprint in as many as 5 different gears if I lead out. You MUST have a good chain installation (it'll break otherwise and you'll face plant spectacularly) and perfectly adjusted gears to do this. My gears are adjusted to shift into smaller cogs perfectly. I have to tickle the shifter to get it to shift into larger cogs sometimes but that's my choice. I don't want the chain to hesitate when I want it to drop down to a smaller cog. Novice mistake when practicing this is to shift more than one gear at a time. You have to learn to exert 100% force on the bars and pedals and still have a delicate touch on the shifter.

    2. You absolutely must have your bars and shifters positioned correctly. Forget the jacked look (levers up high, bars tilted to point to the moon). I watched guys crash because they can't even brake from the drops - stupid, stupid, stupid, and the guy broke a bazillion ribs and he's a lawyer to boot (so he's not dumb). You must be able to shift and brake without moving your hands from your sprinting position. Absolutely no question about that. If you have to wiggle your elbow to reach something when you're in the drops, move that something.
    My rant on this bit:
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...hy-i-hate.html
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...for-crits.html
    Second one shows my bar/lever angle and how my medium sized hands with short fingers reaches everything.

    3. Work on pulling up really, really hard. Lift - bent over rows, curls, butterflys, dead lifts anything and everything that helps you pull up on the bars when you're bent over. I don't work on my legs unless you could very infrequent 90 pound squats and 45 pound leg extensions as workouts. I regularly do pull downs, curls, bent over flys, dead lifts, and core stuff - situps and crunches. I also do work to protect my precious shoulder area - military press, bench, etc. I found my top speed improved with this type of work. My jump really didn't though.

    I know when I'm sprinting hard because my stomach gets really sore. This hasn't happened to me yet and so I know I have more sprint in me. My max wattage at Bethel hasn't broken 1300 watts, but I was well over 1400 at the end of a 5+ hour long hot ride in California. I can't wait to unleash a "real" sprint.

    4. Sprint. First have a good base. This means you can do a 2 or 3 hour harder ride without feeling new twinges. All the fatigue is familiar. Your body isnt' adapting to that ride, simply dealing with it. Then you work on sprints. Do lots and lots of sprints, with some kind of leadout. Failing a leadout, work on starting on a slight downhill so you're going 30 mph without killing yourself. Ideally you should find a 2 mile loop you can do over and over.

    When you start getting a bit queasy and tired, do a few more. When you think you simply can't get going for another, do a few more. You'll be surprised at how resilient your body is. On days where I thought I'd do 2 or 3 sprints and then stop, I've gone to do 30 sprints or more (contesting half of them). I learned I could jump up to three times in one sprint - it takes me a couple months of sprinting to get that second jump, another couple for that third jump. But using a three jump sprint, I could beat much stronger Cat 2s and 1s by coaxing them to go earlier than they wanted to go, then out jumping them when everyone was in the wind already. I haven't gotten past a 1 jump sprint since 1995 but I hope to progress this year. It's like a video game. Gotta earn those jump bonus badges

    5. Positioning/Awareness/Tactics - you seemed to have placed high very early on. This is good. But you should still focus on positioning both during the race and just before the sprint. Learn how to stay out of the wind. I posted a comment on a thread but felt it deserved some expansion so here it is:
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...t-of-wind.html

    I'm glad that you say you got blocked in rather than saying "then I moved right, a bunch of guys went down, and I got second". Awareness during a sprint is critical. Sometimes you get boxed in - in those instances, it's often because you focus on the wheels directly in front of you. If you can look up just a bit, to the racers in front of them, then you'll find it easier to read the field. For example, when driving around a corner (exit ramp, bend in road, etc, where you can see the road for a while), I look around the corner, not at the curb at the apex. Much better awareness of what's happening up front. I learned this the hard way while autocrossing - my times were horrible until I looked 2-3 turns down the course. Suddenly I was much smoother because I wasn't focused on the cone 15 feet in front of the car.

    A good way to practice this is night riding. Point the light up and forward so you can't see the 10 feet in front of you. You learn to read the road up there, not under your tire, and you focus appropriately. This is especially true when mountain biking. A very zen like approach, you simply go as fast as you can, reacting to whatever you see 40 feet in front of you.

    You mention you marked the guy but he took off early. If you're on a wheel of a guy going at 500 meters, it's usually a good bet to go with him. He'll blow at 200-250 (given normal efforts) or you can blow by him at 50 meters to go. If you're not on his wheel then you may not have a choice.

    Even if you're strong, you can't bluff on your strength. At some point you're going to deal with guys just as strong as you are and your bluffing will fail. Then your tactical savvy will affect your results, and if you're a strong dumb rider, your results will reflect this. I'm pretty weak as a rider, no matter how much I train, but I ride as smart as I can and I manage to get some places and even win a race here and there. My sprint helps, of course, since that's what I use to place, but smart riding never hurts anyone.

    Unfortunately, it comes down to genetics for the all out jump. But by working the sprint, tactics, and technique, you can do a lot to overcome the jump.

    cdr

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    Slow'n'Aero DrWJODonnell's Avatar
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    Being the first to jump is always an advantage. Don't bog down the gear as it sounds like you did this. I have counted Boonen's pedal strokes 50 times or more and he always seems to be in the 15-20 pedal stroke range (as are most other's in the "sprint"). I have been told a sprint is 200 meters to go. Imagine 10-20 seconds of screaming pain. I would guess most sprints occur from 150-300 to go with 300 being a long or downhill sprint.

    Just all hearsay though.

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    I don't really know how it happens, it just does.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    What would you have done in this situation?
    Not sure, things play out differently at speed and I wasnt there. Probably I would have gone left with fast guy, if you were on his wheel tightly enough, and things were fast, I'll bet there was a hole big enough to follow him. Maybe not, like I say, I wasnt there so hard to tell. Alternatively, I'd have gone right 100% effort and tried to get on fast guy's wheel asap to take a quick respite and jump him at 100M.

    I knew CDR had >1000 words in him for this thread! Well done!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post
    Not sure, things play out differently at speed and I wasnt there. Probably I would have gone left with fast guy, if you were on his wheel tightly enough, and things were fast, I'll bet there was a hole big enough to follow him. Maybe not, like I say, I wasnt there so hard to tell. Alternatively, I'd have gone right 100% effort and tried to get on fast guy's wheel asap to take a quick respite and jump him at 100M.

    I knew CDR had >1000 words in him for this thread! Well done!
    +1

    I was waiting for his post

    Thanks CDR!

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    Splicer of Molecules Nickel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post

    3) How to improve your jump (many variations on all of these and I dont know if any of these actually work, but worth a try):
    -spinups: 30"on/30"off or more off, do seated, 1st 10 sec. get up to high rpm, 2nd 10" higher rpm, 3rd 10" as fast as you can turn 'em without getting bouncy
    -microintervals: 15"on/15" off for 5' or 10' or etc.
    -jumps: 10" - 15" all out efforts in a ride, with full recovery, 5' or so
    -full on sprints: better done with others to lead out and discovery things about your sprint such as it's length, speed, etc. and more challenging than by yourself
    -form sprints: high speed lower gear sprints focusing on technique
    -power starts and stomps - see CTS training for definitions

    mostly, it's a bunch of trial and error.
    What would 1min intervals be under? When you get up into the minutes is it 1:1 recovery? I have seen some VO2 stuff that seems to be 2:1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickel View Post
    What would 1min intervals be under? When you get up into the minutes is it 1:1 recovery? I have seen some VO2 stuff that seems to be 2:1.
    Hopefully someone who knows what they're talking about will reply, but I can tell you that my workouts have lots of variations on the 30" to 7.5 minute interval length. My understanding from reading training publications is that we're talking about 3 different energy systems (neuromuscular power - NM, anaerobic, and maximal aerobic capacity - VO2Max, and different ways to overlap stressing each of these systems.

    With stuff under a minute, we're talking about neuromuscular power being the primary energy system, and the anaerobic system taking over the closer you get to a minute. Stuff under a minute that my coach has me doing is typically either 1:1 recovery, or full recovery (5 minutes).

    1' to 3': primarily anaerobic energy system, these are really hard. I'm typically doing these with half, 1:1, or 1:2 recovery. Except pyramids where I'll go "up" at 1:1 and down at 1:0.5, those hurt alot.

    3' - 7.5': primarily VO2Max, these are typically (for me) 1:1 recovery

    sorry if the terminology is buggered up, I'm just going with my way of understanding things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post
    Except pyramids where I'll go "up" at 1:1 and down at 1:0.5, those hurt alot.
    Wow, those do sound nasty. I'll have to try that

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post

    With stuff under a minute, we're talking about neuromuscular power being the primary energy system, and the anaerobic system taking over the closer you get to a minute. Stuff under a minute that my coach has me doing is typically either 1:1 recovery, or full recovery (5 minutes).

    1' to 3': primarily anaerobic energy system, these are really hard. I'm typically doing these with half, 1:1, or 1:2 recovery. Except pyramids where I'll go "up" at 1:1 and down at 1:0.5, those hurt alot.

    3' - 7.5': primarily VO2Max, these are typically (for me) 1:1 recovery

    sorry if the terminology is buggered up, I'm just going with my way of understanding things.
    This sounds familiar to me so I think it is right. I guess I am trying to figure out the best way to schedule my workouts in order to do more of these. I know you have to start overlapping but I suppose I am a little unsure of which ones. Example
    M - Group ride (not a hammerfest, some hill sprints)
    T - Crit
    W - figure some sort of recovery + spinups/high cadence
    R - tempo/LT + surges (1-3min?)
    F - tempo
    S - hill climbing
    Su - VO2 max

    I guess I figured that the 1-3min and the VO2 max intervals are pretty killer so they should be on separate days (or do you do one, one week and the other the next) with a space in between (which I guess would vary if you can recovery more quickly). Can you do those intervals and then do a tempo afterwards (or like someone suggested, surge training, so you would do them with a tempo workout)?

    I guess my other question is about hill sprints....and when is it appropriate to do repeated hill intervals instead of a ride that incorporates hills.

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    you train too hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    After the race, I told him that I wasn't expecting him to go so early. He guessed he went with about 400-500m to go, and that he thought it was a good distance for the final push.
    That is a very long sprint for the win, but I won a crit doing that before (taking a flyer off the outside of the final corner with about 300-400 to go), because I knew nobody would be expecting it. I knew I wasn't the fastest sprinter, but if I got a big enough head start, they'd have to catch up to me, and it worked. The next week, someone saw me in the same position and took off going INTO the corner. He got second and I chased his wheel but only got 3rd behind him.

    I'm pretty sure most solo sprints are 100-200m, but keep in mind that team tactics (leadouts) as well as stupidly excited morons) frequently cause the sprint to start earlier and those who slingshot past during the last 100m usually get it.

  21. #21
    cmh
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    Quote Originally Posted by lightbulb View Post
    Sounds like I need to do some higher rpm work. I generally spin pretty fast while riding (usually around 100-105 rpm), but I guess I need to work on just spinning the gear faster on the sprint instead of just pushing a bigger gear. I just get caught up the feeling of "yay, I'm pushing a big gear and sprinting", and sometimes I realize that I'm not spinning as much as I probably should be.



    Another vote for a gearing issue. As far as being boxed in, I'll try to draw a picture:

    Code:
          
                {leadout guy**
                 {fast guy**
     {other guy1** {me**
                        {other guy2**
    I was right behind the fast guy, since I knew he would be going where I wanted to be. He ended up going left around the leadout guy, and I followed him left, but I had to make sure I avoided "other guy1". by the time I got around, fast guy was already up the road a bit. I could have gone right around the leadout guy, but that meant that I would be out in the wind for a few seconds before I could (theoretically) get on fast guy's wheel, since I'd have to cut to the left in front of the leadout. Now that I think about it, fast guy set his sprint up perfectly, as far as blocking me out.

    What would you have done in this situation?
    I'll elaborate on what cdr calls 'looking up the road' for your specific situation. If you were watching both fast guy and leadout guy, and in particular the relationship of the two to each other, you may have been able to predict that fast guy would go left. It is likely that fast guy wasn't riding directly behind leadout guy, but with his front wheel slightly to the left of leadout guy's rear wheel. Seeing this, you want to start to move slightly into other guy1 to give yourself room to stay with fast guy when he goes. Even without noticing this, if you have a guy on our left, and nobody on your right, move just to the left of the wheel in front of you. That makes sure that other guy1 isn't able to steal your wheel and you have the option to go to either side of fast guy when it is time to go.

    Instead of what you showed, make it look like this:
    Code:
          
                        {leadout guy**
                         {fast guy**
           {other guy1** {me**
                        {other guy2**
    Great posts and a lot of good info in here from cdr, wr and mdcatV.

  22. #22
    Robbie McEwen Wannabe tbrown524's Avatar
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    CDR needs to put together a Racing Instuctional Video.. His lengthy post and blog reports really do help. Even the youtube videos!!!
    "Meyrueis, Lozere, June 26, 1977. Hot and overcast. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me."

  23. #23
    elitist jerk daytonian's Avatar
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    Keeping a good wheel as close to 200 as possible is huge.
    Knowing who is on your wheel is huge.
    During a normal sprint when entire pack sprints at around 2-300 yards I'm in the drops w/finger ready to bang smaller gear between 105-110 rpm. I jump at that cadence and shift around 120. Rinse repeat until the throw at the line.
    I feel like a soiled kleenex dropped in the gutter in the red-light district of Paris.

  24. #24
    Back on the Yam-Yam kniprm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickel View Post
    Example
    M - Group ride (not a hammerfest, some hill sprints)
    T - Crit
    W - figure some sort of recovery + spinups/high cadence
    R - tempo/LT + surges (1-3min?)
    F - tempo
    S - hill climbing
    Su - VO2 max
    I would incorporate a rest day somewhere in there.

  25. #25
    Splicer of Molecules Nickel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kniprm View Post
    I would incorporate a rest day somewhere in there.

    I was just trying to illustrate what happens if you don't do multiple things in one day (i.e. where does everything go?). That's not my real training schedule.

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