Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

"The 33"-Road Bike Racing We set this forum up for our members to discuss their experiences in either pro or amateur racing, whether they are the big races, or even the small backyard races. Don't forget to update all the members with your own race results.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-28-14, 07:12 AM   #1376
kindablue
Fly on the wall
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Colorado Springs
Bikes: a few
Posts: 981
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have a question about wheels.

I have a set of specialized fusee SLX (2012) wheels, used for two months only (basically DT swiss 240 hubs, aerolite spokes 20/24, and spec rims) weighing in just below 1500g and a set of fulcrum 7s weighing in at whatever the hell they do. I also have a middle of the line set of DT swiss wheels on the commuter, 404s for racing.

Seems like a bit of overkill so I was planning on selling one set. I'm leaning towards selling the Fusee wheels. I'm 170# at race weight, and sub 1500g clinchers do not seem that necessary. Opinions/suggestions? I was hoping to get at least 500 selling the wheels with 2 month old spec tires as well.
kindablue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 08:23 AM   #1377
rankin116
Senior Member
 
rankin116's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: ChapelBorro NC
Bikes:
Posts: 3,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMonk View Post
Not to open this can of worms full bore (too late), but now I'm thinking of purchasing a new rear PT hub! I've been ballparking my training with heart rate for years and have always been intrigued by power.

I'd probably just ride with it for a year or so before implementing more structured training.


I'm gonna spend some time browsing for economical packages that include a wireless hub, head unit, software suite and all accompanying hardware.
This is what I'm doing.
rankin116 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 08:54 AM   #1378
thechemist
In the Pain Cave
 
thechemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Nashville, TN
Bikes:
Posts: 1,669
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rankin116 View Post
This is what I'm doing.
Why do this?
thechemist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 09:05 AM   #1379
rankin116
Senior Member
 
rankin116's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: ChapelBorro NC
Bikes:
Posts: 3,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Well this is my second year of serious riding and training. I still want to get most of my time in with group rides, for both the experience of riding with a group and the social side of things. I also work 2 jobs and right now my training time is less than ideal. I don't know what I should be working on, targeting, etc. so for me just riding and collecting data at this point is about as much effort as I can put into it.
rankin116 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 09:53 AM   #1380
TMonk
Not actually Tmonk
 
TMonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Bikes: (5): Rock Lobster with Shimano/Sram 10sp mix (road), C'dale Caad9 Red (race), Dolan Precursa (track), Ritchey P-650b 1x10sp (mtb), C'dale "Optimo" (SS/FG)
Posts: 8,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by thechemist View Post
Why do this?
I want to gain some practical experience and intuition from the instrument before I begin applying it more strictly.

I'm in no rush.

EDIT: Now that I think about it, I really just want to understand the way my body works and responds to things, on a quantitative level.
__________________
"Your beauty is an aeroplane;
so high, my heart cannot bear the strain." -A.C. Jobim, Triste

Last edited by TMonk; 02-28-14 at 10:05 AM.
TMonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 12:05 PM   #1381
rapwithtom
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 659
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rankin116 View Post
I still want to get most of my time in with group rides,....my training time is less than ideal. I don't know what I should be working on, targeting, etc. so for me just riding and collecting data at this point is about as much effort as I can put into it.
This is exactly where you can leverage a *good* coach's expertise.


Quote:
Originally Posted by TMonk View Post
I really just want to understand the way my body works and responds to things, on a quantitative level.
This is exactly what a *good* coach can teach you.
rapwithtom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 12:12 PM   #1382
TMonk
Not actually Tmonk
 
TMonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Bikes: (5): Rock Lobster with Shimano/Sram 10sp mix (road), C'dale Caad9 Red (race), Dolan Precursa (track), Ritchey P-650b 1x10sp (mtb), C'dale "Optimo" (SS/FG)
Posts: 8,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
A coach would certainly expedite and optimize that process (understanding my body), but again I'm not in a rush.

I should clarify that I want a power meter for personal gratification purposes, not anything else. I'm a data geek for sure.

Also I probably couldn't afford one anyway; I have too many expenses.
__________________
"Your beauty is an aeroplane;
so high, my heart cannot bear the strain." -A.C. Jobim, Triste
TMonk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 12:13 PM   #1383
rankin116
Senior Member
 
rankin116's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: ChapelBorro NC
Bikes:
Posts: 3,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I have no doubts nor arguments against that but I have no interest in paying for a coach.
rankin116 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 12:27 PM   #1384
thechemist
In the Pain Cave
 
thechemist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Nashville, TN
Bikes:
Posts: 1,669
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rankin116 View Post
I have no doubts nor arguments against that but I have no interest in paying for a coach.
times money
thechemist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 01:27 PM   #1385
carpediemracing
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tariffville, CT
Bikes: Tsunami Bikes
Posts: 14,417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMonk View Post
I should clarify that I want a power meter for personal gratification purposes, not anything else. I'm a data geek for sure.
That's why I got my power meter (first a PT then quickly sold that due to many wheels and got an SRM). Then a second SRM when I realized I'd be moving between bikes somewhat regularly.

To put things in perspective I also got a similar device for the car (Gtech RR) simply for the commute to/from work. It's a data logger that records Gs and such. I don't race cars, I barely mod them, but I wanted to see the data. I'd still use it except it was clunky and ultimately I dropped it one too many times.

I still don't train using power, generally do whatever JRA I want to or think I need to do. It's more of a history record for me.
__________________
"...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson
carpediemracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 04:36 PM   #1386
furiousferret
Senior Member
 
furiousferret's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redlands, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 4,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMonk View Post
A coach would certainly expedite and optimize that process (understanding my body), but again I'm not in a rush.

I should clarify that I want a power meter for personal gratification purposes, not anything else. I'm a data geek for sure.

Also I probably couldn't afford one anyway; I have too many expenses.
It doesn't take too long to get on par with what the power meter is showing you and how it can help. I obsess over numbers to the point of near banishment, that may be why I'm one of the few baseball fans around. In the end you actually have to get on the bike and put in the work, the pm just helps you where and how to direct it.

Its like one of the guys in our Saturday ride says, "Bro, I don't need some hub to tell me I'm pro."
furiousferret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-14, 05:09 PM   #1387
shovelhd 
Senior Member
 
shovelhd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Western MA
Bikes: Yes
Posts: 15,383
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kindablue View Post
Have a question about wheels.

I have a set of specialized fusee SLX (2012) wheels, used for two months only (basically DT swiss 240 hubs, aerolite spokes 20/24, and spec rims) weighing in just below 1500g and a set of fulcrum 7s weighing in at whatever the hell they do. I also have a middle of the line set of DT swiss wheels on the commuter, 404s for racing.

Seems like a bit of overkill so I was planning on selling one set. I'm leaning towards selling the Fusee wheels. I'm 170# at race weight, and sub 1500g clinchers do not seem that necessary. Opinions/suggestions? I was hoping to get at least 500 selling the wheels with 2 month old spec tires as well.
I'd sell both sets of aluminum clinchers and buy a decent set of carbon clinchers.
shovelhd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 08:52 AM   #1388
topflightpro
Senior Member
 
topflightpro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 3,830
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I went out for a mountains ride this weekend and struggled quite a bit. My gearing was not great - 53/39 and 12/27.

As I intend to get out there more this year, I now am debating which route to go for improving my gearing. Here are my options:

1. Keep 53/39 (Quarq) with new Sram Apex Wifli RD and 12-32 cassette.
2. 50/34 (non-PM) with my existing RD and 12-27 cassette.

These two options give me the same gearing when in the 39-32 or 34-27.

Option 1 gives me power and cadence, which I find useful for training, but requires me to purchase a new RD and cassette to swap out when going out there.
Option 2 leaves me without power and cadence, but does not cost anything as I have a compact crank I could pull off another bike. I'd also have to adjust the FD.

I am leaning toward option 1, as I find adjusting a RD to be much easier than fidgeting with a FD. And I also would get to keep power.

What are your thoughts, or do you have any other suggestions?
topflightpro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 09:07 AM   #1389
Ygduf 
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
Ygduf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Redwood City, CA
Bikes: aggressive agreement is what I ride.
Posts: 9,251
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
changing a rear derailleur is a 5 minute job if you have enough cable to work with.
__________________

twitter.com/ygduf
strava.com/athletes/ygduf
Ygduf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 02:04 PM   #1390
furiousferret
Senior Member
 
furiousferret's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redlands, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 4,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
I went out for a mountains ride this weekend and struggled quite a bit. My gearing was not great - 53/39 and 12/27.

As I intend to get out there more this year, I now am debating which route to go for improving my gearing. Here are my options:

1. Keep 53/39 (Quarq) with new Sram Apex Wifli RD and 12-32 cassette.
2. 50/34 (non-PM) with my existing RD and 12-27 cassette.

These two options give me the same gearing when in the 39-32 or 34-27.

Option 1 gives me power and cadence, which I find useful for training, but requires me to purchase a new RD and cassette to swap out when going out there.
Option 2 leaves me without power and cadence, but does not cost anything as I have a compact crank I could pull off another bike. I'd also have to adjust the FD.

I am leaning toward option 1, as I find adjusting a RD to be much easier than fidgeting with a FD. And I also would get to keep power.

What are your thoughts, or do you have any other suggestions?
I'd go with 1 and keep the power.

I run a 50/34 up front and a 12-27 which is swapped out for 11-25's in crits, unless you are a really strong rider its a great setup.
furiousferret is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 02:08 PM   #1391
Wesley36
Senior Member
 
Wesley36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by furiousferret View Post
I run a 50/34 up front and a 12-27 which is swapped out for 11-25's in crits, unless you are a really strong rider its a great setup.
If one has a 110 BDC crankset, I am a big fan of the 52-36 crank.
Wesley36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 03:28 PM   #1392
ovoleg
Powered by Borscht
 
ovoleg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: SoCal
Bikes: Russian Vodka
Posts: 8,344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can mostly go by feel now that I'm used to my power meter. I can tell when its 300W vs 200 vs 400. That said I still look at it throughout the interval to make sure I'm staying within the zone.

1 year to "learn" a power meter is a little extreme. It took me 1 ride to get used to it...
ovoleg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-14, 06:04 PM   #1393
rankin116
Senior Member
 
rankin116's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: ChapelBorro NC
Bikes:
Posts: 3,939
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I used a 50-34 for the longest time and recently switched to a 53-39. I used a 12-27 or 25 cassette. I can barely tell the difference between the two cranksets, and I'm fat.
rankin116 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-14, 11:39 PM   #1394
Inquisitor.
Senior Member
 
Inquisitor.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been riding an aluminum Specialized S-Works with DA 7800 for the past 10 years. I'm finally ready to break down and buy a new bike. I can get a pretty nice team deal, and am looking at getting a Felt AR. I've been trying to decide if I want to set it up with Ultegra Di2, Ultegra 11 speed, or SRAM 22.


Last weekend I rode a couple miles on a Cervelo S3 with Ultegra Di2. I was impressed how smooth it shifted, but the lack of feel/feedback bothered me. However, satellite sprint shifters could be cool. Also, I read that electronic shifters save about 75g of drag compared to mechanical shifters on a Felt AR (about 8w at 25mph).


I've never taken a bike with SRAM 22 for a real ride, but one of my friends is happy with it. I like the idea of shift paddles you can pull in while sprinting.


I would imagine that even Ultegra 11 speed would be an upgrade over my old DA 7800.


My priorities are Performance>Aero>Weight. I'd appreciate some input/experiences with these options. Thanks.
Inquisitor. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 01:25 AM   #1395
UmneyDurak
RacingBear
 
UmneyDurak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NorCal
Bikes:
Posts: 8,519
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Anyone racing on Specialized Romin or Avatar? I think my ass bones just don't like Toupe or Gel Toupe. I thought I raced on the Toupe last year, but now I think I switched to it after racing season from some other specialized saddle with more padding (relatively speaking).
Does Romin has more padding then Toupe?
UmneyDurak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 02:44 AM   #1396
Wesley36
Senior Member
 
Wesley36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by UmneyDurak View Post
Anyone racing on Specialized Romin or Avatar? I think my ass bones just don't like Toupe or Gel Toupe. I thought I raced on the Toupe last year, but now I think I switched to it after racing season from some other specialized saddle with more padding (relatively speaking).
Does Romin has more padding then Toupe?
The difference between the Romin and Toupe is shape, not padding. Romin and Toupe saddles come in a variety of rail materials, amount of padding, and a couple of different materials composing the body of the seat. The lower the price of the saddle, the more padding.
Wesley36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 02:50 AM   #1397
Wesley36
Senior Member
 
Wesley36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inquisitor. View Post
Last weekend I rode a couple miles on a Cervelo S3 with Ultegra Di2. I was impressed how smooth it shifted, but the lack of feel/feedback bothered me. However, satellite sprint shifters could be cool. Also, I read that electronic shifters save about 75g of drag compared to mechanical shifters on a Felt AR (about 8w at 25mph).
...

My priorities are Performance>Aero>Weight. I'd appreciate some input/experiences with these options. Thanks.
As a bike mechanic, I was pretty ambivalent about electronic shifting, until I worked on it. While a test by Peloton magazine found that mechanical actually still shifts faster, I have not found anybody who concludes that mechanical shifts better. The fact that the FD moves in sync with the RD (automatic trim) is just plain cool when one is adjusting shifting.

Lack of feel/ feedback is a common complaint, but everyone seems to get used to it in a few weeks. It mostly seems to be a matter of getting used to a different feel.
Wesley36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 07:03 AM   #1398
topflightpro
Senior Member
 
topflightpro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 3,830
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inquisitor. View Post
Also, I read that electronic shifters save about 75g of drag compared to mechanical shifters on a Felt AR (about 8w at 25mph).
So, not having shifter cables will save 8w at 25mph? I don't know much about aerodynamics, but I have a hard time believing that.

As for the rest of your question, my experience has been that I get used to whatever I have. For example, when I switched from Shimano to Sram, it took a little while, but I got used to it. Now I like Sram and don't really want to ride Shimano. I'm sure if I switched back, I'd hate it for a little while, then get used to it. Also, after years of riding Cannondales, I got an Argon. At first, I didn't really like it. Now, I don't really like going back to the Cannondale.
topflightpro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 07:10 AM   #1399
carpediemracing
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Tariffville, CT
Bikes: Tsunami Bikes
Posts: 14,417
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
With electronic shifting wouldn't the rear shift the same? The mechanism is the same, the chain, the cassette. Under pressure the shifts are determined by where the ramps are on the cogs along with the chain design/shape. How the pulley moves from cog to cog won't alter the rest of it. A well set up mechanical rear derailleur shifts as quickly as an electronic one, from what I can tell.

On the other hand the front derailleur is different. I was amazed at how well the front shifted on electric, even slow rpm and high pressure. This is definitely different from a mechanical front derailleur because under such conditions you have to exert quite a bit of force on the mechanical shifter to move the chain over firmly. It compromises control etc. Electronic is just a touch-shift thing.
__________________
"...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson
carpediemracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-14, 07:19 AM   #1400
Wesley36
Senior Member
 
Wesley36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
With electronic shifting wouldn't the rear shift the same? The mechanism is the same, the chain, the cassette. Under pressure the shifts are determined by where the ramps are on the cogs along with the chain design/shape. How the pulley moves from cog to cog won't alter the rest of it. A well set up mechanical rear derailleur shifts as quickly as an electronic one, from what I can tell.
I hear what you are saying, but pretty much everyone says the same thing - it makes the shifts cleanly, so cleanly that one does not get the same "feedback" that most of us are used to. That little "thunk" feeling as the cable releases a bit and moves to its new position - even with Shimano, you are dealing with a spring and ratchet mechanism - it works by making small jumps. Shifting smoothly is largely about being able to match one's pedaling to that jump. With electronic, the servo sweeps smoothly - there is no little jump as tension is either released or increased, and no little catch at the end as the ratchet mechanism engages.

My boss described it this way after this first race - he would make a shift, and then the bike would just be in the new gear. Lacking the feedback, however, he would generally look down after the shift to make sure it had happened - he was so used to feeling and hearing the shift, that when that feedback was lacking, he doubted that the shift had been made.
Wesley36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:44 PM.