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TMonk 10-23-10 11:23 AM

Just rolled thru the first "practice run" for my seminar on Monday.... 62 min which is perfect, because i'm sure in my nervousness on Monday I will speed things up and omit sections to fit it into the 45-50min window for an A.

Also I didn't look down at my notes once, which is sweet. Time to unwind on BF for 20 or 30 and go give it another run.

Urthwhyte 10-23-10 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 11667325)
Just rolled thru the first "practice run" for my seminar on Monday.... 62 min which is perfect, because i'm sure in my nervousness on Monday I will speed things up and omit sections to fit it into the 45-50min window for an A.

Also I didn't look down at my notes once, which is sweet. Time to unwind on BF for 20 or 30 and go give it another run.

What's the seminar on?

TMonk 10-23-10 11:37 AM

It's my senior project/capstone course:

Title:
Conjugated organometallic polymers: A description of the synthesis and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors featuring a new cyclometalated platinum moiety.


Abstract:
The general properties and photovoltaic parameters of organic semiconductors are introduced after a brief comparison with traditional inorganic (silicon) solar cells. A new class of cyclometalated platinum polymers is introduced in which the primary chromophore is the Pt-Polymer coordination bond. Synthesis, device fabrication and compound characterization are described for two specific Pt-polymers with power conversion efficiencies approaching 1.3%.



Primary article:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/cm9029038

carpediemracing 10-23-10 12:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 11667370)
It's my senior project/capstone course:

Title:
Conjugated organometallic polymers: A description of the synthesis and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors featuring a new cyclometalated platinum moiety.


Abstract:
The general properties and photovoltaic parameters of organic semiconductors are introduced after a brief comparison with traditional inorganic (silicon) solar cells. A new class of cyclometalated platinum polymers is introduced in which the primary chromophore is the Pt-Polymer coordination bond. Synthesis, device fabrication and compound characterization are described for two specific Pt-polymers with power conversion efficiencies approaching 1.3%.



Primary article:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/cm9029038

Reserve me a spot

TMonk 10-23-10 01:02 PM

Just finished round 2 of practice.... 55 min with no hesitation and deliberatly quick speaking.

Looks like I'll fit right into that 45-50 min indo when I add the game-day jitters into the equation.

carpediemracing 10-23-10 01:23 PM

Good luck. I had to slow down and read word by word when you described what you'll be talking about.

I feel... monosyllabic.

cdr

rog 10-23-10 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 11667370)
It's my senior project/capstone course:

Title:
Conjugated organometallic polymers: A description of the synthesis and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors featuring a new cyclometalated platinum moiety.


Abstract:
The general properties and photovoltaic parameters of organic semiconductors are introduced after a brief comparison with traditional inorganic (silicon) solar cells. A new class of cyclometalated platinum polymers is introduced in which the primary chromophore is the Pt-Polymer coordination bond. Synthesis, device fabrication and compound characterization are described for two specific Pt-polymers with power conversion efficiencies approaching 1.3%.



Primary article:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/cm9029038

I'm going to go dig a ditch, now.

Flatballer 10-23-10 01:42 PM

All I can tell is he's making an organic solar material... and I'm an Electrical Engineer...

mollusk 10-23-10 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TMonk (Post 11667370)
It's my senior project/capstone course:

Title:
Conjugated organometallic polymers: A description of the synthesis and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors featuring a new cyclometalated platinum moiety.


Abstract:
The general properties and photovoltaic parameters of organic semiconductors are introduced after a brief comparison with traditional inorganic (silicon) solar cells. A new class of cyclometalated platinum polymers is introduced in which the primary chromophore is the Pt-Polymer coordination bond. Synthesis, device fabrication and compound characterization are described for two specific Pt-polymers with power conversion efficiencies approaching 1.3%.



Primary article:
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/cm9029038

Fuel cell applications?

Urthwhyte 10-23-10 01:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carpediemracing (Post 11667657)
Good luck. I had to slow down and read word by word when you described what you'll be talking about.

I feel... monosyllabic.

cdr

I didn't even get that far...

I did manage to refactor a giant chunk of code on the flight from Nice, however. Some cron magic and DB tweaking and one table shouldn't be getting slammed with requests quite so often

carpediemracing 10-23-10 02:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Urthwhyte (Post 11667723)
I didn't even get that far...

I did manage to refactor a giant chunk of code on the flight from Nice, however. Some cron magic and DB tweaking and one table shouldn't be getting slammed with requests quite so often

Phew. I recognize "cron". I was talking with the Missus about my old life (Linux/Unix build/support) and couldn't really remember much of what I did (ended about 3 years ago). I may have to build a machine for myself so I don't get too rusty. Ubunto laptop (I want to do that anyway on an old one), Redhat "server" (on my current "backup" machine).

TMonk 10-23-10 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carpediemracing (Post 11667657)
Good luck. I had to slow down and read word by word when you described what you'll be talking about.

I feel... monosyllabic.

cdr

This is how I feel when a lot of you guys start talking in computer programming lingo.

To Clarify this (by dept. requirement) is a presentation on someone else's research. It went down at the end of last year at UC Berkeley.

TMonk 10-23-10 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mollusk (Post 11667716)
Fuel cell applications?

Probably not, because this is a solid state material with no charged species in solution.

Once the polymers are synthesized, there is no chemistry involved in the generation of photocurrent. There is no reaction taking place to generate electrons; it's just excitation of one species: the "plastic" semiconductor.

Enthalpic 10-23-10 09:30 PM

For polymer photocells to save the world we need to get away from Pt and other pricey crap. Need a Fe or Mg compound cheap enough to print; but this stuff is a good start.

Flatballer 10-23-10 09:37 PM

the conversion efficiency is also still quite low. Needs a lot of work there before it can compete with the likes of thin-film. Thin-film is already pretty cheap, getting cheaper all the time, has high efficiency, and can be made in all sorts of configurations, some of them very flexible and unique.

Braden1550 10-23-10 09:59 PM

GPS apps on my htc desire and turning a hardcase into a hard-mount for my bike.

TMonk 10-23-10 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Enthalpic (Post 11669422)
For polymer photocells to save the world we need to get away from Pt and other pricey crap. Need a Fe or Mg compound cheap enough to print; but this stuff is a good start.

This is the kind of novel thinking that will really make this kind of technology ("Platinum" solar cells) a truly viable technology. Even with the Pt atom though, these solar cells are much cheaper to manufacture than traditional inog solar cells (Si, CdTe, CuGaInSe2, etc...), however the power conversion efficiencies are low (0.1-7% compared to 14-19% for Si...)

Also these polymers aren't printed, they are spin coated, which in my opinion offers little to no control and wide variability with the morphology of the active layer of the cells, which is the primary determinant in the battle for charge transport vs. relaxation.

EDIT: Ideally I will be able to contribute to this in a couple years from now when I am conducting my graduate research; literally 8-9/10 chemistry/materials graduate schools I have checked out have some sort of photovoltaic research going on. Only time will tell.

TMonk 10-23-10 11:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flatballer (Post 11669444)
the conversion efficiency is also still quite low. Needs a lot of work there before it can compete with the likes of thin-film. Thin-film is already pretty cheap, getting cheaper all the time, has high efficiency, and can be made in all sorts of configurations, some of them very flexible and unique.

These (plastic "organic") semiconductors are present in cells as thin films, are flexible and translucent. However you correctly noted that the big problem with these cells is their low efficeincy (relative to inorganic cells).

slynkie 10-24-10 10:29 AM

hand-editing SNMP MIB files. corporate rules prevent me from using any of the nice free tools that make this so much easier.

Scummer 10-24-10 07:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slynkie (Post 11670825)
hand-editing SNMP MIB files. corporate rules prevent me from using any of the nice free tools that make this so much easier.

Corporate rules against free tools? You work for Mickeysoft?

slynkie 10-24-10 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scummer (Post 11673071)
Corporate rules against free tools? You work for Mickeysoft?

nope. I'd imagine any U.S. corporation big enough to get sued has similar guidelines. Even those heavily involved in FOSS.

Flatballer 10-24-10 07:58 PM

been playing Fallout: New Vegas. Great game, but gives me headaches just like Fallout 3 did. I can't figure out what it is. It feels like motion sickness.

I've played lots of FPS games, lots of first person RPGs, 3rd person RPGs, all sorts of stuff, and never had this problem except in Fallout games. Any idea what could be causing this? I really like the game, but it's not worth getting headaches over.

I think it has to do with the refresh rate, so everything seems jittery when looking around quickly (which happens a lot in this game, lots of time spent looking around for stuff to scavenge).

Urthwhyte 10-25-10 12:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slynkie (Post 11673107)
nope. I'd imagine any U.S. corporation big enough to get sued has similar guidelines. Even those heavily involved in FOSS.

Actually, Microsoft's rules are incredibly liberal relative to its size.

slynkie 10-25-10 06:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Urthwhyte (Post 11674129)
Actually, Microsoft's rules are incredibly liberal relative to its size.

Ok maybe I should clarify...my company has pretty decent rules around this. If you bother going through the process, you can get most tools approved for use if they're sane. What my company is looking out for, is stupid licenses that could allow the tool's copyright owner to claim some right or force some action with regard to the content it produces. e.g. a text editor that says it owns any files you create. That would be an extreme case...less extreme is the "viral" GPL quality.

I'm sure Microsoft is careful about GPL licensed software, no?

Urthwhyte 10-25-10 07:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slynkie (Post 11674581)
Ok maybe I should clarify...my company has pretty decent rules around this. If you bother going through the process, you can get most tools approved for use if they're sane. What my company is looking out for, is stupid licenses that could allow the tool's copyright owner to claim some right or force some action with regard to the content it produces. e.g. a text editor that says it owns any files you create. That would be an extreme case...less extreme is the "viral" GPL quality.

That's understandable and increasingly common these days

Quote:

I'm sure Microsoft is careful about GPL licensed software, no?
I don't work for them personally and can't comment extensively, but I do know engineers there that opt to use vim over VS (although I imagine that's had plenty of time to be approved, seeing as it's been around since before I was born)


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