Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

"The 33"-Road Bike Racing We set this forum up for our members to discuss their experiences in either pro or amateur racing, whether they are the big races, or even the small backyard races. Don't forget to update all the members with your own race results.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-06-11, 10:39 AM   #1
graphs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
graphs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto
Bikes:
Posts: 856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Adjustmenst for easy wheel swapping

This maybe a 41 question but i think it pertains to racing more than not.

I have been trying to set up my brakes so that when I swap between wheels they are reasonably well adjusted for all my wheelsets. It seems that when they are set up nicely for one wheelset, they are completely out of whack for another. I'm wondering if there is a trick to this and I'm just doing it wrong or is it just a fact of life that different hubs are going to orient the rim differently between the brakes.

I have not had to change wheels mid-race yet but when it does happen I'd like to be able to close the quick release without encountering brake rub.
graphs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:05 AM   #2
pjcampbell
fair weather cyclist
 
pjcampbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Green Mountains
Bikes: Colnago c50
Posts: 1,337
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That is my experience
When i go from zipp 303 clincher to 202 tubular with the same hub, i have to readjust entirely from cable length to brake pad height. So you would ideally have similar or same rim and hub I guess.
pjcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:12 AM   #3
ericm979
Senior Member
 
ericm979's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains
Bikes:
Posts: 6,170
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You should not have to adjust brake pad height between wheels unless you have those funky carbon clinchers with the lowered brake track.
If some of your rear wheels are incorrectly dished, fix them.

All my wheels are close enough that I can swap them and not make adjustments to brake or derailleur.
ericm979 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:34 AM   #4
waterrockets 
Making a kilometer blurry
 
waterrockets's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Austin (near TX)
Bikes: rkwaki's porn collection
Posts: 26,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
^^^^ +1

I've never had to make adjustments to brakes for different AL clinchers either. Can you elaborate on what you're having to do?
waterrockets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:37 AM   #5
graphs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
graphs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto
Bikes:
Posts: 856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Both my good rear wheels are factory built so I would assume (maybe incorrectly) that they would be properly dished (Dura Ace 7850 clinchers and Easton EC90 Aero tubulars). It's not the height so much as how they're centred between the brake pads. The problem exists on the front as well, though to a lesser extent.
graphs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:39 AM   #6
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer
Posts: 19,705
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Even with different height brake tracks - which I run into a lot - you shouldn't have to mess too aweful much with them.

What I usually find are problems with others is the dishing of the wheel and the thickness of the pads.

If your wheels are all relatively the same then set the brakes up to be the tightest on the widest rim. Then you should only have to adjust cable tension after that.
Psimet2001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:41 AM   #7
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer
Posts: 19,705
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by graphs View Post
Both my good rear wheels are factory built so I would assume (maybe incorrectly) that they would be properly dished (Dura Ace 7850 clinchers and Easton EC90 Aero tubulars). It's not the height so much as how they're centred between the brake pads. The problem exists on the front as well, though to a lesser extent.
if they both aren't centered then it's the dish. Period. That's how you measure it.

Take a front and flip it around. The gap on one side should now be on the other side. If the gaps stay the same then that wheel is centerd and the other is incorrectly dished.
Psimet2001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:43 AM   #8
graphs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
graphs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto
Bikes:
Posts: 856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think that is my problem. I set up the brakes so they're the perfect, equal distance on the Eastons but when I put the DAs on and close the quick release, one side of the brakes is pressed right against the rim. I guess I'll try setting up on the DAs and see if the problem exists in reverse.
graphs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-11, 11:46 AM   #9
graphs
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
graphs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Toronto
Bikes:
Posts: 856
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ok, gonna test that tonight. Hopefully it's not the tubs that need to be redished. Thanks fellas.
graphs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:51 PM.