Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Common bike racing?

    Are there races, say for people with bikes costing less than $1000-1200?

    Here's my reason for asking: Bikes are costing more and more these days. If bikes were common, as they once were, (70s) then there could be a test of many more riders.

    Such a race would promote bike racing.

    The proof of what I'm saying can be seen in ******/shooting target competition. That sport was waning in popularity, because the guns became more and more expensive. Then organizers started a practical-tactical competition in which participants had to use an off the shelf ***, such as a police officer would carry. That sport - for it's size - has became much more popular, as any body can afford to compete. (I know guns and bikes are apples and oranges, but the cost climb of fancy hardware is exactly the same; however different the hobby)

    My personal reason for posting this: I have an $750 bottom line road bike, and I'm never going to own a $4000-$7000 bike. Yet, I can scoot along pretty well on my stocker, and more importantly, I'm not the only one, because I get passed by other people on cr-mo steel bikes. There are many more of us, who would like to race on a leveled playing field. And our wives will never allow us to own a four thousand dollar bicycle ;o)

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    My Bikes
    Trek 1000, Giant TCR Composite 2
    Posts
    914
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are no bicycle price categories as far as I know. Nor should their be. The largest deciding factor of how well a rider is going to do is the rider. Put the guy that wins consistently on a cheaper bike and they’re still going to win consistently. Oppositely, put that guy that never wins on a $4k bike and they're still not going to win.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can race with ANY bike you want as long as the frame goes by the traditional concept of a bicycle frame. Two double triangles.

  4. #4
    NFL Owner monogodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Irving Heritage District
    My Bikes
    7-Eleven Eddy Merckx, Vitus Futural, Catamount FRS, Colnago SL, SS MTB
    Posts
    1,487
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by R600DuraAce
    You can race with ANY bike you want as long as the frame goes by the traditional concept of a bicycle frame. Two double triangles.
    From the 2005 USCF rulebook (pdf file):
    1J. Bicycles
    1J1. Bicycles used in competition must be propelled solely by the rider's legs and shall have the following characteristics:
    (a) Dimensions. Bicycles may be no more than 2 meters long and 75 cm wide, except that tandems may be up to 3 meters long
    (b) There may be no protective shield, fairing, or other device on any part of the bicycle, which has the effect of reducing air resistance except that spoke covers may be used
    (c) Wheels may be made with spokes or solid construction. No wheel may contain special mechanisms to store and release energy
    (d) The handlebar ends shall be solidly plugged and attachments thereto shall be fashioned in such a way as to minimize danger without impairing steering. Handlebars used for steering with ends, features, or attachments that extend forward or upward or that provide support for other than the the rider's hands are permitted only in time trial and pursuit events (not in Team Sprint); however, attachments that point upward on the brakehoods of road bicycles are allowed if the distance between them is greater than 25 cm (9.8 inches). [disqualification]
    (e) Bicycles must meet current UCI technical regulations at events that select 17-18, U23 and elite riders for international competition or national teams.
    (f) Bicycles commonly known as recumbent may not be raced in USCF races unless there is a separate race for this category of bicycle, and then may be used only in that category.

    1J2. Riders are responsible for their selection of competition equipment and for taking reasonable precautions to insure that its condition is adequate and safe for use in competition.

    1J3.
    (b) For road races, only a bicycle with a freewheel and one working brake on each wheel shall be used, except as allowed elsewhere in these rules.
    I see nothing about frame design other than the dimension restrictions and no recumbents.

    edit: I just checked the UCI rulebook, and they do have a restriction for a two-triangle frame. So unless he's wanting to race internationally, he can ride any frame that meets USCF rules (i.e. Kestrel Airfoil).

    edit 2: I realize he's not on a Kestrel, or other non-traditional frame design. If he's serious about racing, he should get his USCF license and race. My point was that we don't know if he's going to run across a great deal on a non-traditional frame in the future. If he does, he may pass on it because you've told him that he can't race it, when he can. Regardless, he should race. I know of a few racers that ride inexpensive bikes and do well. Hell, give Lance Armstrong a Huffy, against me on my Eddy Merckx, and he'll still kick my ass.
    Last edited by monogodo; 02-09-05 at 07:47 AM.
    198? Colnago Super (Campy Record) | 1989 Eddy Merckx 7-Eleven Team Issue (Dura Ace) | Catamount MFS (1x8) | Top Image Neptune (SS)

  5. #5
    Tiocfáidh ár Lá jfmckenna's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    The edge of b#
    My Bikes
    A whole bunch-a bikes.
    Posts
    5,401
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    LOL
    crashbandit you don't need a lot of money in a bike to race it. I still race cross on an old beat up circa 1985 nashbar touring bike that I bought off my brother for $100. I understand your point I think, and that is that it may be intimidating for a young aspiring racer to start racing when he or she does not have all the fancy stuff that others have. A lot of it is pure marketing. And trust me when you get to the podium on an old beater it means all that much more to you. For $750 - $1200 as you mentioned you are in the prime price zone for a good racing bike.

  6. #6
    Lance Hater Laggard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    4,316
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And most people own more bike than they will ever really need. You do not need a $5,000 Colnago to be competitive in a cat. 4 or 5 race.

    So it's not a matter of mandating lower priced bikes. People simply need to be educated that they can effectively race with their second hand $1000 Trek.
    i may have overreacted

  7. #7
    Announcer EventServices's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    In the drops.
    My Bikes
    Too many and not enough
    Posts
    4,994
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well said, Laggard.

    The only rule I have is that the bike shouldn't hold you back.

  8. #8
    wavylines
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bull City
    Posts
    546
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by crashbandit
    Are there races, say for people with bikes costing less than $1000-1200?
    My $400 bike (used) has 2 wins and 5 podiums, so, yeah, there are races for cheaper bikes. You might feel weird on a "cheap" bike at first, but after a race or two you get over it. Besides, equipment is far and away the least important part of racing. I tell people that it's 70% fitness, 25% strategy, and only 5% equipment. And of that 5% equipment, most is just keeping the bike well maintained. Many racers have more expensive bikes not because it really gives them much of a performance boost but just because they're spending much more time on it than your average rider. A Joe Blow twice-a-week recreational rider might be doing 100-150 hours of riding a year, while a lot of the cat 1s and 2s are doing as much as 1000. At that point, they figure they deserve a $4K bike.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    915
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Someone like myself who is very serious about racing and pretty much have no other life outside of work, training, and racing. I have no problem dropping down $800 to $1200 on a new frame every 1 or 2 year. I just dropped a grand on DA10sp since my current 9sp really needs some overhaul. I have the set for 3 years. I have no girl friend. I don't hang out. My parents do work so they don't really heavily rely on me finanically. I like to treat myself with better bike parts because I find it enjoyable.


    Quote Originally Posted by curveship
    My $400 bike (used) has 2 wins and 5 podiums, so, yeah, there are races for cheaper bikes. You might feel weird on a "cheap" bike at first, but after a race or two you get over it. Besides, equipment is far and away the least important part of racing. I tell people that it's 70% fitness, 25% strategy, and only 5% equipment. And of that 5% equipment, most is just keeping the bike well maintained. Many racers have more expensive bikes not because it really gives them much of a performance boost but just because they're spending much more time on it than your average rider. A Joe Blow twice-a-week recreational rider might be doing 100-150 hours of riding a year, while a lot of the cat 1s and 2s are doing as much as 1000. At that point, they figure they deserve a $4K bike.

  10. #10
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Riverside, California
    My Bikes
    Trek 2100 Road Bike, Full DA10, Cervelo P2K TT bike, Full DA10, Giant Boulder Steel Commuter
    Posts
    6,025
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I own a trek 2100 that I train with etc. It is light but not as much as the 5k bikes. I would not ride a 5k bike in a crit anyway with the perpensity to crash. With evenly matched riders bike weight can make a difference. For you and me our limiting factor is physical not equipment wise. The reason I have a 2.5k bike is the amount of time I spend on it in the first place.

    BTW there are people on bikes significantly less expensive then mine beating me... just a nature of the sport. I am training to get better. While I am faster personally on my bike with better components it will not make me beat others.

    I would not want to race a 5k bike in a crit... unless you want to replace a 2.5k frame when you crash hard...
    Just your average club rider... :)

  11. #11
    By-Tor...or the Snow Dog? hi565's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Ma
    My Bikes
    Bianchi Cross Concept, Flyte Srs-3
    Posts
    6,481
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I onw a bianchi brava, the thing is like 25 lbs? and i think i do ok, im not in the best shape, but i am going to do a pretty rigorous trainging scheduel to train myself, so i think that i can do well on my chromo bike!

    I have beat some guys on my bike(passing that is) never really looked at their bike, moslty im too happy because i passed them
    ----------------------------------------------------------

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Laggard
    And most people own more bike than they will ever really need. You do not need a $5,000 Colnago to be competitive in a cat. 4 or 5 race.

    So it's not a matter of mandating lower priced bikes. People simply need to be educated that they can effectively race with their second hand $1000 Trek.
    You can get some great bikes on eBay, if you don't care about looks and are willing to look past the big American names. I got my 2003 Colnago lux dream with full dura ace for $900, and its only problems were dirty tires, a used-looking seat, and dirty handle bar tape, costing me $100 to replace.
    Otherwise, you will be fine on your bike. Don't wory about it and have fun.<---If its not fun it won't be even with a $5,000

  13. #13
    sundy hopeful berny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    My Bikes
    Connondale MTB, Malvern Star (historic) Orbea, GT (newest)
    Posts
    1,068
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally I think that $1 to 2k is about the price range you'd be looking at to win regularly in cat 4/5 but you can still participate on a cheaper machine, and lets face it, participation is where the fun is, placing is a bonus.
    The trick is, you need to try to use the bike to comute. This way it becomes your main means of transport and then you can argue that given the savings; (fuel, insurance, registration and maintenance) you can justify spending a couple of k/year on a nice bike.
    Works for me

    There are also some very nice second hand bikes around which can be had for reasonable $$$. I bought a '2004, 3k 10sp campag Orbea on Ebay for Aus$1305.00 in almost brand new condition!
    The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher, smarter, faster and better looking than most people.

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The price of you really doesn't matter .the was a young fellow named Phil Thaux who one day decided to come and have a race. He rocked up on a second hand mountain bike. We all laughed head then kicked our butts and continued to do so on his old bike. He now has an Pro contract in Europe and this was only a four years ago.

    It all about the heart the legs and the head.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry I have just read what I posted and the grammar is awful.I hope you get the jist.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    248
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    1. An expensive bike is just an excuse for performance. 90% of your performace comes from your legs, your lungs, and your heart!

    2. A cheap bike is a great excuse when you don't do well! Except make sure no one aware of rule #1 is within hearing distance however......

    3. There is nothing more satisfying than winning with a $500 ebay bike and beating riders with the $5,000 treks, etc.

  17. #17
    Senior Member rich007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NJ/NYC
    My Bikes
    2008 Salsa Fargo
    Posts
    420
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by LapDog
    1. An expensive bike is just an excuse for performance. 90% of your performace comes from your legs, your lungs, and your heart!

    2. A cheap bike is a great excuse when you don't do well! Except make sure no one aware of rule #1 is within hearing distance however......

    3. There is nothing more satisfying than winning with a $500 ebay bike and beating riders with the $5,000 treks, etc.
    Agree, on all three points, esp. the last one....

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,251
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have sometimes "daydreamed" about a way to make bike racing as popular among the general American public, as say, Pro wrestling or "Monster Truck Jams". And, races that feature "cheap" bikes available at the corner LBS.

    I was thinking about a race that involves ten or so of the "big" names. Set up a "figure eight" sort of track in an indoor, air-conditioned football stadium with some sharp turns and extremely steep climbs on the course. Have a series of three one hour "heats", with thirty minute breaks between each heat. No teams. Each rider is riding only for himself. Significant cash prizes for the top three riders in each heat. And enormous prizes for the "overall" winner at the end of the day.

    And, set up a scoring system that enables someone to "win" the day's event based solely on their best two "heats". That way, a crash, or flat tire in one heat would not prevent someone from winning the overall championship.

    So, who would "sponsor" such a race? Why not put every rider on a Trek 1500? An affordable bike, so folks watching the race might think, "hey, I could buy that bike". And, the riders, not the bike, will decide the outcome of the race. And, Trek would get a ton of good publicity.
    Last edited by alanbikehouston; 02-11-05 at 04:18 PM.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by alanbikehouston
    I have sometimes "daydreamed" about a way to make bike racing as popular among the general American public, as say, Pro wrestling or "Monster Truck Jams". And, races that feature "cheap" bikes available at the corner LBS.

    I was thinking about a race that involves ten or so of the "big" names. Set up a "figure eight" sort of track in an indoor, air-conditioned football stadium with some sharp turns and extremely steep climbs on the course. Have a series of three one hour "heats", with thirty minute breaks between each heat. No teams. Each rider is riding only for himself. Significant cash prizes for the top three riders in each heat. And enormous prizes for the "overall" winner at the end of the day.

    And, set up a scoring system that enables someone to "win" the day's event based solely on their best two "heats". That way, a crash, or flat tire in one heat would not prevent someone from winning the overall championship.

    So, who would "sponsor" such a race? Why not put every rider on a Trek 1500? An affordable bike, so folks watching the race might think, "hey, I could buy that bike". And, the riders, not the bike, will decide the outcome of the race. And, Trek would get a ton of good publicity.
    Trek 1000s with Dura Ace, lol, like nascar, yeah any american can buy that ford










































    disclamer: only has 145 hp

  20. #20
    rider of small bicycles geneman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Rochester, New York
    My Bikes
    Cannondale
    Posts
    1,686
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK ... I'll be the first to admit it. Feel free to jump in if you agree. Jens Voigt could be on a 100 lb cast iron boat anchor with square wheels and he would still kick my a$$.

    Although I hate to agree with him, Lance was right ... it's not about the bike.

    -mark

  21. #21
    @ Checkmate Cycling jbhowat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    CAAD 8 - Ultegra
    Posts
    1,622
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Its the Indian, not the Arrows. I was first told this by a guy whose ass I was kicking in golf. haha. Funny thing is, if you pick the right clubs, you can get a significant boost by having better clubs. The effect is greatly, greatly reduced on a bike. That said, I hate golf even though I'm really good at (less handicap than fingers, on one hand - at least when I was playing everyday a few years ago).

    I like a sport where when you make a mistake you can channel your anger. Golf is one of the few that this doesn't usually work. I used to play hockey - you can definitely channel your anger there. I would say you can with cycling too, but you need to be careful not to crash someone or nuke your legs too early, but when I know when I get pissed off I can give an extra 10%. (and yes there is that rare chance that you are pissed when you step up to the tee and hit the crap out of the ball, but more often than not, being pissed would mess with my tempo and smoothness.)
    Checkmate Cycling Products, LLC
    Carbon Fiber for Less!
    www.checkmatecycling.com - New Site Design Coming Soon!

    Checkmate Carbon Wheel Group Buy Part Deux - Full carbon wheelsets starting at $660 / 1340g.

  22. #22
    sundy hopeful berny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    My Bikes
    Connondale MTB, Malvern Star (historic) Orbea, GT (newest)
    Posts
    1,068
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry guys but I've just last December graduated from an '87 six speed, downtube shift, 10kg, cromo Malvern Star to a new Alum/carbon 10sp STI Ultegra, hollotech/octalink........ 7.9kg GT and the improvement in my performance has been simply amazing. The STI's allow instant shifting and the 10sp gives me all the ratios I need to stay on the boil. The light weight allows me to accelerate very well and stay in touch, and being less energy sapping the bike leaves me with some petrol in the tank to contest the finish sprint which was not an option on the MS.
    I could still participate on the MS for sure, but it'd be a long time before my old legs had sufficient grunt to do well on the heavier bike.

    So the 10% which is the bike does make a very significant difference when racing.
    The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher, smarter, faster and better looking than most people.

  23. #23
    @ Checkmate Cycling jbhowat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    CAAD 8 - Ultegra
    Posts
    1,622
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, the original poster was talking about a modern road bike costing from $700-2000. Most bikes in that range can be had with STI of some sort, and they will probably be far lighter than your '87.
    Checkmate Cycling Products, LLC
    Carbon Fiber for Less!
    www.checkmatecycling.com - New Site Design Coming Soon!

    Checkmate Carbon Wheel Group Buy Part Deux - Full carbon wheelsets starting at $660 / 1340g.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Kansas City
    My Bikes
    Diamondback centurion. Home built tandem
    Posts
    658
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I compete in CAT-5 races with a crap diamond-back that is atleast 10 years old.
    I works well because i can take care of it.

    I do this for one reason, and one reason only, I Am poor as dirt. I dont have a dime to my name.

  25. #25
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    8,061
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To a certain extent I agree with Llama. Although in TT it really helps to have a right equipment.
    Was at Davis race today. Damn some of those wheels Stanford guys had cost more then my bike.
    Last edited by UmneyDurak; 02-12-05 at 10:37 PM.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •