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Old 02-16-05, 05:07 PM   #1
skydive69
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Seeking advice on my first time trial

I am going to compete in my first time trial races in March. I was a successful track/road running competitor, and one of the techniques I used was negative splits - I would typically run the second half of the race slightly faster than the first.

I just finished reading "Bike Racing 101," and in that book the author recommends treating a short time trial as two races - the outbound loop, and the inbound loop. He recommends racing the outbound as if that was the complete race, and then giving it whatever is left on the finishing leg. That seems a bit self defeating to me in that if you blow up on the first half, you will (in my opinion) turn in a much slower time then had you ridden an even pace or negative split. Perhaps racing time trials is different than running for some unknown reason, and if so I would like the opinion of experienced time trial participants. The distances I will be racing, BTW, is 5K and 10K, and I will do the 10K about an hour after the 5K. I plan to leave it all out there on the 5K, and hope to recover enough to do okay on the 10K.

Any input from you experienced racers would be appreciated.
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Old 02-16-05, 05:25 PM   #2
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The distance of both events are so short that you can just follow the advice in your quote "Ride till you puke then ride faster" . Make certain that you are good and warmed up and then go all out on the 5K. Once you finish the 5K drink gatorade or whatever you like to drink, take a little break and then start getting warmed up for the 10K.

You might want to ask over in the triathlon section for advice as well.
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Old 02-16-05, 07:04 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by ZackJones
The distance of both events are so short that you can just follow the advice in your quote "Ride till you puke then ride faster" . Make certain that you are good and warmed up and then go all out on the 5K. Once you finish the 5K drink gatorade or whatever you like to drink, take a little break and then start getting warmed up for the 10K.

You might want to ask over in the triathlon section for advice as well.
Gee, I guess I had the answer all along! Thanks for the input.
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Old 02-16-05, 09:06 PM   #4
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Go as fast as you can.

Some aerobars will significantly improve your time.
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Old 02-16-05, 09:22 PM   #5
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In a short TT (which is the main way I race right now, well until crits) you basically push as far into your anarobic range for as long as you can. You should ride a few 5k and 10k before to see how far you can push your body. Race day warmup on a trainer before the run until full warm. You do not want to be cold at the start. Others have advised to go anarobic a few times during warm up to get your body ready.

You need to do a few practices to see where you can push in a TT... ride till you puke is almost right. You want to ride just to the point that your muscles will give in, but not that far. Areo bars are a good idea for flat TT's, just practice with them first.

For longer TTs you need to conserve more energy and not go "All out" the whole time if you can not hang. I do quite a few 15 mile and longer TTs and I found that if I go 100% (or even 95%) the whole time I blow up half way. You just need to pace yourself push it towards the end.

Comparing to Crits and Road Races the theory is alittle different. People give me the acronym leave nothing on the road, go as far as you can the whole time... that has worked for me.

Good Luck
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Old 02-17-05, 07:18 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by kubla khan
Go as fast as you can.

Some aerobars will significantly improve your time.
I wonder if their are any clip on aerobars that will fit on my flat FSA K-wings?
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Old 02-17-05, 07:27 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by my58vw
In a short TT (which is the main way I race right now, well until crits) you basically push as far into your anarobic range for as long as you can. You should ride a few 5k and 10k before to see how far you can push your body. Race day warmup on a trainer before the run until full warm. You do not want to be cold at the start. Others have advised to go anarobic a few times during warm up to get your body ready.

You need to do a few practices to see where you can push in a TT... ride till you puke is almost right. You want to ride just to the point that your muscles will give in, but not that far. Areo bars are a good idea for flat TT's, just practice with them first.

For longer TTs you need to conserve more energy and not go "All out" the whole time if you can not hang. I do quite a few 15 mile and longer TTs and I found that if I go 100% (or even 95%) the whole time I blow up half way. You just need to pace yourself push it towards the end.

Comparing to Crits and Road Races the theory is alittle different. People give me the acronym leave nothing on the road, go as far as you can the whole time... that has worked for me.

Good Luck
Thanks for the input. My personality has always been of the type to leave nothing on the road. In all my years of track and road racing, my wife watched me only once. It was an invitational master's mile competition. Going into the last lap, I had a lot to make up, and by one furlong to go, I started an all out sprint which ultimately led to a win. The upshot however (besides a beautiful trophy) was that I had to be attended to by the paramedics. I do pain very well, and will withstand any pain to win. I mostly fear that my lack of experience (none) will be quite detrimental - especially in that this particular race brings in lots of ringers because it is a qualifying event for the Florida Senior Games.

I started my speed work the day before yesterday with 6 intervals of one minute at proposed race pace plus 10%. It was a real wretch fest! After about the 4th interval, and my stomach trying to toss its non extistent cookies, I considered packing it in, and finishing up with an hour of spinning. Fortunately, a little voice inside pointed out to me that if you quit on a workout, you are going to quit in a race. I did my two final intervals.

BTW, I got that particular workout from:

http://www.floridacycling.com/time_trial_training.htm

There is a local course marked out for 5K, and I intend to do some practice time trials on it. Thanks for your input.
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Old 02-17-05, 09:28 AM   #8
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I remmeber my first set of intervals like that...

I got real dizzy and almost fell of the bike in one of the sprints.
The real thing is to know what your limits are and try to not push them too much.

My first long distance TT I paced myself the whole way and average over 22 MPH on a hilly course... many people were shocked about my time. I can deal with pain but I do not have a huge tollerance. When Iget in the heat of the moment I seem to forget about that though...
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Old 02-17-05, 10:02 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by my58vw
I remmeber my first set of intervals like that...

I got real dizzy and almost fell of the bike in one of the sprints.
The real thing is to know what your limits are and try to not push them too much.

My first long distance TT I paced myself the whole way and average over 22 MPH on a hilly course... many people were shocked about my time. I can deal with pain but I do not have a huge tollerance. When Iget in the heat of the moment I seem to forget about that though...
I particularly used to kill myself with my track running workouts. I used to do repeat 440's with a 60 second rest between the next interval. Sometimes when it was time for the next one, my stomach would be queasy but off I would go. I used to regularly get my HR over 200. It sure made me tough on race day though! Cycling is rather new too me. I started in late May, but I have surprised myself with my rapid progress. I did some wheel sucking the other day for a rather extended period at 31 mph - the guy doing the work was a rather successful road racer. I hit 35.9 mph on the flats the other day for a new speed record! Right now I only have a base of only 4300 miles, but I am riding at least 5 times a week. I'm about to turn 65 BTW.
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Old 02-17-05, 02:59 PM   #10
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65, holy ***** - good going !!!

I assume flat TT's, no hills? 5km is still 6 or 7 minutes riding, I would go hard and build up continually until I was at absolute MAX for the last 1km and puke on the finish line.

10km is more steady pace the whole time, just under threshold HR, again, last 1km is flat out until puking !
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Old 02-17-05, 03:11 PM   #11
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65, holy ***** - good going !!!

I assume flat TT's, no hills? 5km is still 6 or 7 minutes riding, I would go hard and build up continually until I was at absolute MAX for the last 1km and puke on the finish line.

10km is more steady pace the whole time, just under threshold HR, again, last 1km is flat out until puking !
Yes, it will be absolutely flat. Hell, I even wretch at the end of club sprints - I just love to win them and give them everything in my guts. When there is a prize at the end, I will leave zero on the road other than puke!

Interestingly, some of the better riders in our club are 60 and over. We have an ex olympian, and ten times national (open not master) champion, a gold medal winner in the masters world sprint championships in England, one guy who won 26 out of 28 races in one year (in the good old days), who can still make the training group suck air to suck his wheel. He recently led me on a good stretch at 31 mph with me a couple inches off his wheel. One guy who brought home a ton of medals from the Pan Pacific games in Australia, etc. It's a great atmosphere for old farts, and a bit frustrating for some of the youngsters that get their butts kicked on the club ride sprints!
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