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  1. #1
    Robbie McEwen Wannabe tbrown524's Avatar
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    Training Cold, Racing Hot

    I normally train at 4am in 50-55 degree weather however this past weekend I raced in a different area with 80 degree weather. I didn't change anything in my pre-race warm up. However, I could feel that I my breathing was a bit off during the race and I was struggling. I ended up pulling out of the race in the last three laps, unable to latch on after a crash(not met). The race was pretty fast however I don't beleve this was the cause of my DNF. I was coughing for hours after the race.

    Just wondering if others have experienced the same. After this experience, I plan on training in the afternoon in warmer weather.
    "Meyrueis, Lozere, June 26, 1977. Hot and overcast. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me."

  2. #2
    **** that mattm's Avatar
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    I think the race was just too hard, to be honest.
    cat 1.

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  3. #3
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Ygduf's Avatar
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    I train in warm afternoon temps, and mostly race in freezing cold early morning races.

    Race adrenalin should take over most of the difference. It's unpleasant for a little bit, but once you're going I kinda forget about it.

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  4. #4
    Robbie McEwen Wannabe tbrown524's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattm View Post
    I think the race was just too hard, to be honest.
    Yes it was!! Ended up packing up to go play with Legos.
    "Meyrueis, Lozere, June 26, 1977. Hot and overcast. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me."

  5. #5
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    if you can replicate your race conditions in your training without sacrificing the training, go for it. if switching up your training times jeopardizes whether you'll get the training in or means you'll be doing it tired from a work day or miss some days because of matters beyond your control, then I wouldn't (and don't) switch things around.

    also, if this was just 1 race, give yourself a couple more to acclimate before making wholesale changes. also, also, if this is one of your first races of the year, sometimes "unstructured" intensity hits the legs differently than "structured" and can cause a shock to the system.

    tbrown, you'll have to figure out what went sideways on you, but it might not be just the temps since you are citing breathing as a difficulty rather than the "I was so hot I felt like my head was going to explode" heat related difficulties.

  6. #6
    soon to be gsteinc... rkwaki's Avatar
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    I have talked about this before and heat acclimatization is something that people often neglect. My mentor and coach always said to train in what you race. We always started our training day about 10-11 am so that we were riding in the heat of the day. When I was racing I would regularly train in in 100 degree heat. I taxes the body in a completely different manner. I had a friend who struggled with racing in the heat so he started to ride rollers in a sauna. He was National Champion two years later. Though 80 degree heat isn't like a furnace it is very different than training in 55 degree heat.

    If it were me and I were in the same situation I would spend some time in the sauna at the gym (I know you have a membership) - 20-30 minutes a couple times a week. If you want to make in interesting take a facecloth with you, wet it and put it over your face (waterboard yourself). Work up to this, start with 10 minutes and keep going. My one gym sauna I have been in at 195 degrees - kind of like slow roasting a hog... There was a lineup outside with silverwear ready to eat...
    "if you ride it the way it's meant to be ridden there's no way any wife is less of a ***** than a bicycle." - gstein

  7. #7
    Senior Member furiousferret's Avatar
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    I can't attribute it to racing but while in the Corps there were a ton of times when we would run in 70 degree temps and then the the next week have to train in the 100's (either in the Gulf or 29 Palms) and yeah it does affect performance. For me cycling is a different animal since riding provides somewhat of a fanning effect. I really don't start moaning about the heat until it hits 107. Granted, I whine like a girl if its under 65.

    For some temperature change is worse than others. Every time we hit the tropics on our deployments half the ship would get sick for a few days.
    judging from what you post on here it seems having a powermeter has caused you to focus on ewang numbers without much a focus on developing actual fitness.

  8. #8
    Senior Member hack's Avatar
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    Trainer + space heater?

  9. #9
    ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Ygduf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hack View Post
    Trainer + space heater?


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  10. #10
    Senior Member hack's Avatar
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    Can't say I've ever done it, but I do know a few folks that have tried it for hour long stints. They said it was absolute misery.

  11. #11
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    I do my lower intensity trainer workouts in long sleeves and tights. Maybe even a hoody depending on how cool it is in the house. Its completely unbearable for higher intensity intervals though.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hack View Post
    Can't say I've ever done it, but I do know a few folks that have tried it for hour long stints. They said it was absolute misery.
    Its not fun but its no worse than riding in 100+ temps.

  13. #13
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    I've done trainer riders bundled up in tights, jacket, I think even booties. Recently I've been doing knickers, thick LS jersey, cap of some sort. It's more so I warm up quickly. Also I'm just cold if I'm in shorts and a SS jersey. Right now I'm in jeans, LS t-shirt, and thick socks, and feeling a bit chilly.

    Although I think it's good to train in whatever conditions you race in, training in any condition is better than not training. For many years I went to SoCal for a winter training camp, riding in 65-100 degree temps (I'd say 75-90 is the most common temp range, and I'd hit the 30s and 40s when climbing Palomar), then return home to race in Bethel in 30-40 degree temps. When I was fit I raced well. When I wasn't fit I didn't race well. The temperature swings weren't responsible for my performance or lack of it.
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  14. #14
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    I think that kind of stuff is old school cycling lore that doesn't make any sense, like bonk rides, warming up with a jacket on when it's warm outside, not drinking water, smoking to open the lungs, or riding when it's 34 deg F and raining out outside instead of on a trainer. if it impacts your ability to spend time in zone and recover for the next day, next training session, next training block, it probably isn't worth doing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDcatV View Post
    I think that kind of stuff is old school cycling lore that doesn't make any sense, like bonk rides, warming up with a jacket on when it's warm outside, not drinking water, smoking to open the lungs, or riding when it's 34 deg F and raining out outside instead of on a trainer. if it impacts your ability to spend time in zone and recover for the next day, next training session, next training block, it probably isn't worth doing.
    Heat adaptation isn't lore. Besides that there have been tests that show that elevated body temps in training can have a huge effect on the body.

  16. #16
    formerly dnuzzomueller dz_nuzz's Avatar
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    My coach has had me do "hot boxing" this winter, riding inside with a jacket with no fan. By god does it suck, but it also nets some pretty nice heat acclimatization and apparently some performance gains.
    I don't like cats.

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