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  1. #1
    Senior Member CanadianBiker32's Avatar
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    Do Pros Stop In a Race

    Just curious about some of the europe tour races the Pros Do. For something like Tour De France or any other major endurance road cycling event.

    Do any of the pros during the race ever stop at a rest station to fuel up? food , water? or is everything and everyone always riding and just doing hand offs from the support car?

    from what i seen seems most just keep riding?

  2. #2
    Senior Member CanadianBiker32's Avatar
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    Stopping during a long road race

    Doing a Road Race soon, called race the lake in Wisconsin.

    I am racing in like a 3rd or forth wave of starting and ability, not pro area.

    its about 90 mile course. there will be rest stops as the race is like Grand Fondo, as different level of abilities and some people just there to ride the course at own pace etc.

    now i am going to race and do my best. With the rest stops, would even people in the racing areas be stopping at rest stop or would most just keep riding whole duration

    there will be a few water bottle hand off areas,

    in other words to be successful and possible get a good placing, would most just keep riding
    and just rely on what have for calories already with me and electrolyte etc
    thanks

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    powered by Racer Ex gsteinb's Avatar
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    merged thread.

    races don't typically have rest stops. not unless they're ultra endurance stuff I guess.

    Pros stop to pee, or perhaps when they crash. Sometimes they do either and keep going.

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    Senior Member Moyene Corniche's Avatar
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    There isn't a rest station per se as you are thinking, there are feed zones, where musettes are handed up by trainers / soigneurs as well as at where allowed the support in the team cars can hand out bottles and food.
    As far as stopping, No unless it is an entire peloton agreement to stop and pee. It happens but not as often today as it did in the past. Usually a ride will just have a teammate push while he takes care of pressing matters or they'll just keep riding and water the grass. a slight downhill is best and hopefully not too many spectators in the way. lol

    OP what you are doing sounds more like a Gran Fondo or an endurance event but not a race. If it is advertised as a race then it would need to fall under the jurisdiction of USA Cycling.

    But to answer your question is an assumption since we don't know your level of fitness. So I'll err on the side of caution.
    From your description I would say you will need to refuel at least once at one of the feed/rest stops.
    90 miles is long but not impossible, but can you give us a bit more info on where you are at training wise and fitness level thanks.
    Ah.... Voila les Cannon ... !!

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    powered by Racer Ex gsteinb's Avatar
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    217+41-33=225

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    Quote Originally Posted by Moyene Corniche View Post
    OP what you are doing sounds more like a Gran Fondo or an endurance event but not a race. If it is advertised as a race then it would need to fall under the jurisdiction of USA Cycling.
    Anyone can organize a bike race. It doesn't have to follow under the jurisdiction of USA Cycling. The local week night crit in a city park is not USA Cycling and doesn't require their license. In Oregon, many races are organized under the flag of the Oregon Bike Racing Association (OBRA).

    The event in question is listed as a race with winners and cash prizes. Here are a few details:

    Ganther Race the Lake August 17, 2014 | Events | DuTriRun

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    Senior Member ips0803's Avatar
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    Pretty sure one of the FDJ riders this year dismounted during the tour to use an RV potty to take care of some imminent intestinal distress.

    Not exactly what you're asking, but poop, so meh.

  8. #8
    Must Go Faster veloboy971's Avatar
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    I would say most keep riding. I can say this based on the fact that if there's actually a prize, others will use every advantage they can get to win and if that means not stopping then so be it. 90 miles is not that long a distance you can carry all the food you need the only thing you need extra is water if it is hot (although if its cool temps you could prob carry water as well).
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Moyene Corniche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gl98115 View Post
    Anyone can organize a bike race. It doesn't have to follow under the jurisdiction of USA Cycling. The local week night crit in a city park is not USA Cycling and doesn't require their license. In Oregon, many races are organized under the flag of the Oregon Bike Racing Association (OBRA).

    The event in question is listed as a race with winners and cash prizes. Here are a few details:

    Ganther Race the Lake August 17, 2014 | Events | DuTriRun
    I'm aware that there are organizations outside of USA Cycling that organize races. Some have been around for a long time. I'm not disputing their viability however just for the sake of argument. If one is inclined to race and more importantly to move up the category ladder then USA Cycling is really the only game in town as it's the only one recognized world wide or in other words. You can race in competing organizations but your results would not count and you might be subject to sanctions if you were to race as a USA Cycling member.

    As to the topic at hand, I still say this is really not a race as we know it. Huge mass start of infinite abilities, rest stops and reading the online flyer it seems like a more dangerous event then it needs to be. I didn't see at the very least a separation of riders by ability. I personally wouldn't participate in such an event mainly because of the logistics.
    It's a race but it really isn't controlled. That leaves it open where you are going to have riders rushing to get ahead, riders from the back of the field, all the while there is a yellow line rule, traffic is not stopped and must be allowed to pass, there is incoming traffic.

    To the OP I would say Caution is needed, by his original post I would surmise that he is not that experienced of a rider and to me this event sounds like it could easily get dangerous.
    I'm all for doing Gran Fondo's but for something like this which combines a critical mass ride and a race I think it is fraught with too many risks.
    But YMMV
    Ah.... Voila les Cannon ... !!

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    The race is seeded by ability/expected pace, with the first wave being 26+mph expected pace. First wave also is cat1/2 or proof of 26mph races over 60+ miles. Also you can only "win" if you are in the first wave. So the event is a serious race with top ability riders, followed by a few more races of slightly less ability, followed by large group ride.
    As for the OP's question, I can tell you from experience that the front pack of each wave is not going to stop at all. If you want to stick with the front group in your wave plan to bring all your food with you, and water for the first 50 flat miles where the bottle drops start. That being said, the rest stops will be packed with riders not pushing the front of their wave.

  11. #11
    \_(ツ)_/ Ygduf's Avatar
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    proof of 26mph races...

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  12. #12
    Newbie cyclinganomaly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanadianBiker32 View Post
    Doing a Road Race soon, called race the lake in Wisconsin.

    I am racing in like a 3rd or forth wave of starting and ability, not pro area.

    its about 90 mile course. there will be rest stops as the race is like Grand Fondo, as different level of abilities and some people just there to ride the course at own pace etc.

    now i am going to race and do my best. With the rest stops, would even people in the racing areas be stopping at rest stop or would most just keep riding whole duration

    there will be a few water bottle hand off areas,

    in other words to be successful and possible get a good placing, would most just keep riding
    and just rely on what have for calories already with me and electrolyte etc
    thanks
    I heard that people come from all over to enter, including other countries, but didn't know who they were the day of the event, so I couldn't talk to them. I just did it for the first time this year, so now that it is past, it won't help much, but it will be here for future reference.

    There was 2 places where they were handing out either Gatorade or water bottles. They were also handing out energy gels at both those places, plus one more place where they were handing out energy gels. There was no need to stop if you didn't want to.

    There was rest stops that had porta potties, water coolers, and food. Those were set up for the people who were just treating it like a big group ride.

    Ultimately it is up to you what you want to do and what you want to accomplish, and on race day how you feel. As for me, I went there to race and do as well as possible. I went to the bathroom right before going to the staging area, started with 2 full Gatorade bottles, and 2 pockets full of Kwik Trip cookies! I did grab a water bottle at the second bottle exchange. I didn't stop at all for any reason, however I did have a police officer signaling me to slow down as I was coming back into FDL at the hwy 151 intersection. I lost a few seconds because of that, but it didn't bother me, at that point I had already exceeded my wildest expectations on how well I would do. I'm for sure going back next year!

    How did you do?



    Quote Originally Posted by Moyene Corniche View Post
    I'm aware that there are organizations outside of USA Cycling that organize races. Some have been around for a long time. I'm not disputing their viability however just for the sake of argument. If one is inclined to race and more importantly to move up the category ladder then USA Cycling is really the only game in town as it's the only one recognized world wide or in other words. You can race in competing organizations but your results would not count and you might be subject to sanctions if you were to race as a USA Cycling member.

    As to the topic at hand, I still say this is really not a race as we know it. Huge mass start of infinite abilities, rest stops and reading the online flyer it seems like a more dangerous event then it needs to be. I didn't see at the very least a separation of riders by ability. I personally wouldn't participate in such an event mainly because of the logistics.
    It's a race but it really isn't controlled. That leaves it open where you are going to have riders rushing to get ahead, riders from the back of the field, all the while there is a yellow line rule, traffic is not stopped and must be allowed to pass, there is incoming traffic.

    To the OP I would say Caution is needed, by his original post I would surmise that he is not that experienced of a rider and to me this event sounds like it could easily get dangerous.
    I'm all for doing Gran Fondo's but for something like this which combines a critical mass ride and a race I think it is fraught with too many risks.
    But YMMV
    I will give you your argument on this one. I can sum it up in one simple sentence; Here in Wisconsin USA Cycling has NO long distance road races, or endurance races! None! Zip! Zero! Zilch! In addition to that the criterium season is only about 3 months long (April, May, & June) and after that in July they had one time trial, and one road race. Then that's it until next year. Simply put, the Race the Lake and all the WiSport races exist here in Wisconsin to fill a gap that USA Cycling simply does not fill. Off the top of my head I only remember only seeing 3 USA cycling road races. One was only 30 miles for the cat. 5 racers. The road race at the LaCrosse Omnium, which is only 40 miles for the cat. 4/5, also despite being listed as a Wisconsin race is actually held across the river in Minnesota. (Both of which I wanted to attend but didn't make it due to work.) The third was the Spring Prairie Road Race, which I did attend, and that one was only 39 miles for the cat. 4/5. (It was done on rural back roads, 6 laps of a 6.5 mile course.) I do realize that most crits they do close the roads to traffic, which is by far the safest thing to do, but the Spring Prairie Road Race was open to traffic, and they had the center line rule in effect, but it was by no means any safer then the Race the Lake. They had the combined cat. 4/5 race running at the same time as the cat. 3 which they started a few minutes before. I ended up getting dropped, and later when the cat. 3 racers came up to pass me, they forced me off the pavement into the grass. Nice, huh? I was lucky to keep it upright and get back on the road without going down. Safer? I think not. No one tried to force me off the road during the Race the Lake, then again I didn't get dropped either.

    The first wave for the Race the Lake was scheduled to start at 5:45am on Sunday morning, I think they were slightly behind. My wave was supposed to start at 6:13 but we were 5 minutes late starting. Early Sunday mornings is going to be the time with the least amount of traffic on the roads. I didn't encounter many cars, either coming at me, or passing me. I realize why USA Cycling don't have anything like this, the logistics of setting something like this up has got to be a nightmare. It went through Fond du Lac, Oskosh, Neenah, and Menasha, which are all larger cities in Wisconsin, and the Fox Valley is the higher population area then most of the rest of the state, and there is simply no way to avoid going down or across some major highways and city streets. There were people guarding intersections, and they were stopping traffic when possible or necessary. I was able to do the entire course without stopping for any reason, but I did over hear someone complaining that they did get stopped at an intersection by a police officer to let traffic through. Honestly, they did the best they could.

    Starting in waves at is intended to sort the riders into groups so people of similar ability would be riding together. If it worked as advertised it would be a safer event, however you do have a lot of people signing up to be in the wrong wave. You needed to meet certain requirements to sign up for wave 1, but the other waves were just what you decided to pick when you signed up. Throughout the day I had passed a lot of people that got dropped from earlier waves, I typically give them lots of room, or you should call out to let them know you are going to pass them. Typical bike safety which you should already know.

    I will say to each their own on what you consider to be real racing, or to what kind of racing that you enjoy doing. I don't want you to think that I am criticizing you, I'm just putting my view point forward. The guy who taught me how to draft and most of what I know about pack race tactics doesn't have any interest in this kind of racing, his thing is time trials. As for me, I got my interest in racing, and cycling in fact, from watching the Tour de France. So in my mind that is real racing, starting at this point, going to that point, and all the miles in between, lots of miles. The Race the Lake is the only thing around here that comes close to that. The USA Cycling events don't even try to simulate that, the WiSport races do somewhat, but are much shorter.

    What kinds of sanctions would USA Cycling put on someone for participating in such a race? To me it seems stupid to even consider doing something like that, mainly for the reason that they don't offer anything that is even remotely close to being an equivalent race. If it was crits like they do, well then I could see that.

    Don't get me wrong, I want to do the USA Cycling races, I want to move up, I have my goal of becoming a cat. 1 racer. I have my license, but I am only a cat. 5 due to the fact I have only done 2 of their races. As I pointed out earlier, there isn't anymore locally until next year. In addition to those 2 races I have done 4 of the WiSport races, plus the Race the Lake. All of which took place at times when there was no USA Cycling permitted events going on here. I know they don't count for anything in the eyes of USA Cycling, or the experienced racers that do their races, but those additional races have provided me with valuable race experience that I have no other way of getting prior to next year, and that will make me a much better racer next year when they start their season again.

    To sum it all up, the wave 1 of the Race the Lake is the real race, the other waves are just a race simulation. I'm glad I did it this year, doing it was an awesome experience that I have been unable to get anywhere else, and I doubt I could get anywhere else. I exceeded my wildest expectations of how well I thought I could do, and that has given me encouragement and hope for doing better in the future. I have full intentions of doing the Race the Lake again next year! I even recommend it being a bucket list event.




    Quote Originally Posted by Ygduf View Post
    proof of 26mph races...
    I suppose it would have to be a chip timed race. You provide them with the information they need to verify it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member CanadianBiker32's Avatar
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    Hi there yes I just did the Race the Lake event this past weekend and it was amazing ride. I did do it to race as thats what i usually do. Have to admit felt shorter then other races i done as i done a few 100 mile mt bike races that take way much longer. I did the 90 mile event in about 3 and half hours , maybe around 337 i think was my time. i thought it would take longer, but being all flat, with only a moderate hill made a fast event. the course was beautiful, passing through all those towns and the countryside
    have to say i was great. no i didn't need to stop in fact after finishing i felt i wanted to do a 2nd lap
    i was in 3rd wave.so was hoping for a challenge
    Course was 90 miles. Quite an easy course. Just only one hill that required a moderate amount of effort otherwise mostly flat and fast.


    For summary, was learning experience overall. Start was told it would be a slow motor paced rolling start for first few miles. Was misleading as it just took off within the first 10 seconds. Was stuck at not quite almost back of the pack while the pack of 20 at the front literally took off. Not all people in wave were into chasing, so ventured up and did work with other guys to try to catch lead group, as there was possible time, but the 2 guys i was riding with gave up even though we gained ground , so all well and just went back and ride with a group of other 18 pack right behind and hope for the best.
    overall was good ride, everything went well. was able to push it , and have energy.
    the pack i was in for 3 wave was a little less challenging as many times pace was going slow then picked up so was a mix. After doing the one climb, i dropped the group as many seemed not interested in pushing it on climb, so rode on my own for a while and caught a few more people and ride with more others later on.
    completed the course in just over 3 and half hours. so not a bad time . Being a first time experience riding with a large group of people always a learning experience.


    with the front group breakaway early, seem i think even catching up would probably have a chance to probably keep pace with them as final times were quite similar


    So a few things i figure to learn for next time.

    1. if do same event another time, position near front of pack at start, so just in case group break aways , get in the group and hope for the best. and try for a chance


    1. remember my timing chip, lol . left timing chip in room, so not officially in results for event, but at least i timed it on my garmin and was physically there, lol



    Otherwise fun event. would consider again for sure.

    Will do it next year and hopefully remember my timing chip from the room this time , lol

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