Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-16-16, 10:59 AM   #1
bobotech
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Spokane, WA
Bikes: Specialized Sequoia Elite/Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Ti/'85 Trek 520
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
GF's son has only one usable arm and does not have opposable thumbs, 2 wheel bike OK?

My girlfriend's son was born with a congential heart defect which also caused him to have only one full arm and one tiny short arm with only part of a hand. The boy is twelve now. He doesn't have the greatest of balance as well. I know there are plenty of people who ride with only one arm but the catch is that his good arm doesn't have an opposable thumb. He has 5 fingers that all work the same so he can't wrap his whole hand and grasp something like most people can. He also doesn't have the strength that most people would have in their arm.

I'm worried that he in an emergency situation won't be able to control the bike. His mom though wants him to learn to ride a 2 wheel bike. I really think that something more akin to a tadpole bike would be better. A 3 wheeled recumbent.

What do you guys think?
bobotech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-16, 01:32 PM   #2
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 20,358
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 632 Post(s)
The balance will be the problem , so convince Mom to consider 3 wheels

probably require custom engineered controls Off the top of my head, Im thinking like a joy stick

maybe combined to have steering moving the lever Rt/Left , pull back to Whoa! brake

though pushing forward would be a positive feed back .. the more deceleration the body in motion,
would push the lever More . maybe the braking would be too sudden.

a twist grip to control a Nu Vinci Continuously variable ratio, rear hub would be at the tip of the joy stick..

just turning the grip makes the gear harder/higher, or easier /lower ..

In Spokane you have this unique resource SFCC Technical/Professional Programs - Orthotics & Prosthetics Technician

I had Intrest in going there so I could help the returning Vets , but couldn't afford the relocation costs for the move + I was already Old.

Last edited by fietsbob; 06-20-16 at 03:53 PM.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-16, 03:22 PM   #3
LBlady111
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 53
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If balance is any part of the equation I'm thinking a trike. I had one for a while when I needed that kind of seating and the balance of a three wheeler vs. 2. I think some kind of steering and breaking device could be adapted. Position of my hands on bike handlebars is huge re arthritis in my thumbs and fingers. The thumbs really get me sometimes are just not usable re gripping. In my case I can use some semi rigid or rigid thumb guards that don't allow for much bending and hold my thumbs in extension. I've rode my hybrid and mountain bikes with these and used the base of my hands for most function but is kind of tough. I'd check out what adaptations can be made as perhaps suggested in some previous posts.
LBlady111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-16, 10:12 AM   #4
bobotech
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Spokane, WA
Bikes: Specialized Sequoia Elite/Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Ti/'85 Trek 520
Posts: 2,253
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Thanks guys. I'm going to do more research into what is safe or not. Like I said, I'm more concerned about the safety aspect. And yes, he does have balance issues as well.
bobotech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-16, 05:03 PM   #5
groth
astro
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pennington, NJ
Bikes: Bianchi Volpe, '97 (no more, it died), Greenspeed GTVS6, '05, Trek 520, '13
Posts: 268
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I'm with the Mom! Probably the most important thing to the kid is to be like other kids. If he's on a trike the teasing from the other kids will be overwhelming. Let him try, he probably won't get going fast enough to hurt himself. You might be surprised at what he's able to do. If it doesn't work out, then perhaps think trike.

- Ed
groth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-16, 01:47 PM   #6
Bezalel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: City of Brotherly Love
Bikes: Raleigh Companion, Nashbar Touring, Novara DiVano, Trek FX 7.1, Giant Upland
Posts: 1,531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
It's best to start with a single speed with coaster brakes. At some future point he can upgrade to an IGH.


If his bone density is typical and wants to ride a 2 wheeler let him go for it.
Bezalel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-16, 01:52 PM   #7
Bruces
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Bmx bike with a coaster brake .
Bruces is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-16, 12:06 PM   #8
Groo
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
once he is up to speed the inherent balance of a bike will help him out.

something with coaster brakes and the biggest tires (more gyroscopic stability) on a frame he can handle would be the best I'd think.

lack of an aposable thumb is a non-issue in my book.
Groo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-16, 08:24 AM   #9
Philphine
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 468
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I was playing with an idea for a nephew with one arm, but I never finished it to definitely say it would be a good solution.

I picked up a foot forward type bike. a 24" coaster brake sun beach cruiser at first, then a smaller 6sp huffy venice. the venice is discontinued and would take some searching to find I think there are a few other smaller foot forward type bikes around (don't know how big he is). with a seat that has a backrest on it. that way he wouldn't need to support any weight with his hands leaning on the bar. the backrest also holds you in place when trying to accelerate or push up hills (I put them on my own semi recumbents so I know that part works pretty good). I worked on a couple other things pertaining to it having gears and handbrakes, but his working hand is more able. a coaster might be a better deal for his situation.
Philphine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-16, 03:17 AM   #10
bike_galpal
swobogirl
 
bike_galpal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Bikes: Fuji Team, Swobo Sanchez
Posts: 188
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
i mean, why have gears and a brake lever when you can have a coaster brake? or even a kickback hub with coaster brake? he could use a pretty "normal" bike.

lack of an opposable thumb doesn't seem like that big a deal. a foot forward bike would definitely help with stability, but i think you could also get a bar setup that would work well enough - i'm trying to imagine what would be easiest to grip AND push forward against without a thumb, and a few things come to mind. it seems like what might actually be ideal is some very upright flat bars or maybe even bullhorns or bar extenders - that way he can bend his wrist to be able to push forward with his palm while still wrapping his fingers around most of the way.
bike_galpal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-16, 10:06 AM   #11
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East
Posts: 1,309
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
The kids are not going to sneer at a decent trike but probably would for a "granny trike". It's not an inexpensive solution but there are higher seating tadpole trikes that are easy to get in and out of for someone with only one usable arm. There is a bike shop that deals with adaptive cycling mostly for returning vets but also for kids. Check out Power On Cycling in TN. Power On Cycling - Recumbents - Trikes - Accessories - Tennessee I've read a number of posts about adapting trikes to a single brake lever. That store may be able to give you some good ideas.
VegasTriker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-16, 05:21 PM   #12
Northwestrider
Senior Member
 
Northwestrider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Gig Harbor, WA
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker, Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, Dahon Mu P 24 , Bacchetta Strada, Rodriguez Tandem, Wheeler MTB
Posts: 2,453
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
A recumbent allows one to ride with out any real weight on our arms, twist grip shifting works well , the balance area may be a problem however. IMO a trike should not be ruled out.
Northwestrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-16, 06:10 PM   #13
brianmcg123
Senior Member
 
brianmcg123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: TN
Bikes:
Posts: 591
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)
I think if he were to have some kind of glove on his good arm that has a thumb like hook so that he would be able to leverage his fingers around the handlebar to make a good grip would work. That way he could still use the brakes and not have to grasp the bar with his fingers so tightly.
brianmcg123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-16, 07:06 PM   #14
CliffordK 
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 10,330
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 552 Post(s)
I bet half the neighborhood would want to try out his tadpole trike.

Shimano makes an 8s Nexus Coaster Brake hub that I would build into either the trike, or bicycle (if he learns to ride a standard bike).
SRAM may have a 9s version. I'm not sure if it is still available.

Anyway, it can't hurt to try the kid on a bike. The worst thing that could happen would be he might fall off of it. Maybe try it on soft grass, although hard pavement is easier to ride on.

Some people learn to ride a "push bike". Take the pedals off, maybe the whole bottom bracket off, and get him used to pushing and coasting.

My nephew was slow learning to ride a bike. 8, I think. Anyway, I got him riding an afterburner trailer (Allycat Shadow). Your kid might be big for that, but you might try a cheap tandem. That would at least get him to balance some, hang on, and to pedal.

BTW:
If you ever make it down here to Eugene, CAT does do some custom adaptive bike building, although it isn't cheap.
CliffordK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-16, 12:08 AM   #15
breakingaway12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianmcg123 View Post
some kind of glove on his good arm that has a thumb like hook so that he would be able to leverage his fingers around the handlebar to make a good grip would work.
this could be a solution.. I agree with this
breakingaway12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-16, 03:18 PM   #16
genesplitter
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Bikes: couple lugged steel bicycles, 1 fixie, 1 aluminum MTB
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A good way to learn to balance is remove the pedals on a normal bike, basically turning it into a skoot-bicycle. Once balance is learned then put the pedals back on. This is also a good technique for adults learning to ride.

I can ride my bike one-handed and without using my thumb as long as I'm riding upright. A tucked forward racing position would be really uncomfortable and harder to handle an emergency stop.

Last edited by genesplitter; 06-20-16 at 03:22 PM.
genesplitter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-16, 05:59 AM   #17
FoxMulder
Senior Member
 
FoxMulder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 108
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I second a nice trike. A trike vs bike won't make any difference in being teased by kids. The ones who are going to do that will do it regardless.

If he really wants to ride a bike, then as someone else said, a coaster brake setup with either a single gear, or a IGH with an index shift would be the best bet IMHO.
FoxMulder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-16, 08:10 PM   #18
Ironfish653
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Virginia Beach
Bikes: 1997 Cannondale CAAD3 Custom, 1974 Bridgestone SuperLight, 2008 Chariot Cougar2
Posts: 24
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I'd go with a trike, too. My 8-year-old has autism, which affects his balance and coordination. After several seasons of attempts with different variations on balance bikes and training wheel setups, we got a Mobo Triton, which is a recumbent, rear-steer trike with hand brakes and push-pull steering.
It's not as racy as something like a CaTrike, but far less expensive.

Also, look for a local affiliate of ICanBike, or ICanShine, who organize day camps that teach disabled kids to ride 2-wheel bikes.
Ironfish653 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-16, 12:59 PM   #19
Midlo Rider
Member
 
Midlo Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Midlothian, Va
Bikes:
Posts: 27
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Have her find someone who knows how to use a 3D printer and works with people with disabilities. I work with a group here in Virginia that is making all sorts of items for people with disabilites using this type of printer. This is a very up and coming field. Look also for a local "Makerspace" which should have the knowledge to make what will help.
Midlo Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-16, 01:45 PM   #20
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 20,358
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 632 Post(s)
You bother asking Here? SFCC Technical/Professional Programs - Orthotics & Prosthetics Technician Yet?
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-16, 07:43 PM   #21
BlazingPedals
Senior Member
 
BlazingPedals's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Middle of da Mitten
Bikes: Trek 7500, RANS V-Rex, Optima Baron, Velokraft NoCom, M-5 Carbon Highracer, homebuilt recumbent
Posts: 8,940
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
Utah Trikes also does special needs conversions. If he were adult-sized, I'd say a Windcheetah, which uses a joystick arrangement, might be adaptable for 1 1/2-handed control; and the joystick lays in the rider's lap, for easy access.
BlazingPedals is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-16, 09:50 PM   #22
Jeff Wills
Insane Bicycle Mechanic
 
Jeff Wills's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: other Vancouver
Bikes:
Posts: 7,972
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobotech View Post
What do you guys think?
It's been a while since this thread started, but...

The Portland Handcycling organizers have try-out trikes (not just hand-powered) where you can look at different types of adaptations. RecumbentPDX also deals with trikes and adaptations. It's too late to register, but the Recumbent Retreat has bunches and bunches of friendly people who will practically mug you to give you a test ride.
__________________
Jeff Wills

Comcast nuked my web page. It will return soon..
Jeff Wills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-16, 05:51 AM   #23
Chris0516
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Washington Grove, Maryland
Bikes: 2003 (24)20-Speed Specialized Allez'
Posts: 733
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Three wheels
Chris0516 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:21 PM.