Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-22-16, 10:01 AM   #1
1 Miyata Biker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Northwest Ohio
Bikes: Schwinns and Miyatas
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Prostate issue...need saddle advice.

I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike! Needless to say...I don't like that advice! I'm used to riding an average of 1,500 to 2,000 miles during the riding season in Ohio. I've reluctantly obeyed the doctors advice, but I miss my bike! Does anyone out there have any advice on an alternate style saddle that would relieve the pressure off of the Nether Region which in turn should relieve pressure off of the prostate gland. I have been using a Brooks B-17 for several years now, and find it to be comfortable. I know there are some "new" saddle designs out there, and wonder if anyone has tried a saddle out of the ordinary due to similar Nether Region problems. All comments/suggestions are very welcome.
1 Miyata Biker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-16, 10:06 AM   #2
NYMXer
Senior Member
 
NYMXer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Middletown NY
Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix EVO w Hi-Mod frame, Mercier Galaxy AL and Giant Anthem X. Old bikes, Motobecane Fantom Pro DS
Posts: 1,440
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 332 Post(s)
There are many good saddles for prostate relief and I hope that you get some qualified answer from members here that went through what you are. In the meantime, listen to your doctor or get a second opinion.

I was having numbness issues, but a relief saddle fixed that for me.
NYMXer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-16, 12:06 PM   #3
keg61
short WIDE Clyde
 
keg61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Oil City,PA USA
Bikes: 2011truebicycles.com explorer tricycle,2014 Nashbar flatbar roadbike
Posts: 199
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike! Needless to say...I don't like that advice! I'm used to riding an average of 1,500 to 2,000 miles during the riding season in Ohio. I've reluctantly obeyed the doctors advice, but I miss my bike! Does anyone out there have any advice on an alternate style saddle that would relieve the pressure off of the Nether Region which in turn should relieve pressure off of the prostate gland. I have been using a Brooks B-17 for several years now, and find it to be comfortable. I know there are some "new" saddle designs out there, and wonder if anyone has tried a saddle out of the ordinary due to similar Nether Region problems. All comments/suggestions are very welcome.
I would suggest the Brooks Imperial, it has the center cutout that you need
keg61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-16, 02:25 PM   #4
fietsbob
Banned.
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 25,912
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2261 Post(s)
maybe Noseless types .. How are you with Chairs in General?

Prostate is within your Pelvis

Dr put a finger up your anus to touch it as a Basic swelling diagnosis technique .
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 06:59 AM   #5
blakcloud 
Senior Member
 
blakcloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Bikes: Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Brompton S/M3L (modified)
Posts: 1,506
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 185 Post(s)
I had prostatitis for 18 months and I tried a Specialized Avatar with cutout which didn't work. Then I tried a Spongy Wonder noseless saddle which also didn't work. When I say didn't work, I mean that the pain was exasperated after I rode. That doesn't mean you shouldn't try it. Not riding my bike for a year and a half was difficult and I gained 25+ pounds.

After a year I started to look at trikes but eventually I got better and I didn't have to go that route.

My problem is different than yours so take what I write with a grain of salt. My PSA was not high but I had plenty of pain everyday. It still hurts but not as much and I don't ride everyday but at least I can ride when I want.

Good luck.
blakcloud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 05:47 PM   #6
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Bikes: 1982 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser
Posts: 3,207
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike!.......... All comments/suggestions are very welcome.
Here's my comment......if I had been informed to stop riding my bike, having been personally diagnosed with prostate cancer, I would immediately find a doctor who is current in today's world regarding prostate issues.

A high PSA reading might not be from anything other than irritation; HOWEVER, there could be very well be more to it.

FYI---Types of PSA Test
OldTryGuy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-16, 06:09 PM   #7
jon c. 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 2,677
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 366 Post(s)
The Selle Italia SLR superflow did wonders for problems I was having with numbness. Wider cutout that most similar styles. (Much less expensive from UK retailers.)
jon c. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 07:11 AM   #8
flan48
Senior Member
 
flan48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike! Needless to say...I don't like that advice! I'm used to riding an average of 1,500 to 2,000 miles during the riding season in Ohio. I've reluctantly obeyed the doctors advice, but I miss my bike! Does anyone out there have any advice on an alternate style saddle that would relieve the pressure off of the Nether Region which in turn should relieve pressure off of the prostate gland. I have been using a Brooks B-17 for several years now, and find it to be comfortable. I know there are some "new" saddle designs out there, and wonder if anyone has tried a saddle out of the ordinary due to similar Nether Region problems. All comments/suggestions are very welcome.
Hi Miyata,
Before you get too panicky, I can relate to you my experience:
In June of last year my PSA suddenly spiked from my normal 2.3/2.4 to 4.8. The 4.8 in of itself is not that terrible, the concern is the large jump. The urologist suggested a re-test in 1 month. He did say that cycling could cause an irritation of the prostate. So for 5 days prior to the re-test I stayed off of the bike and, wala, a PSA of 2.4.

Then 6 months later, and this past June I went through the same routine and sure enough, the PSA is at 2.4.

So, assuming your doctor will prescribe a retesting, stay off of the bike for 4 or 5 days prior to the test and see what happens. We're all different and our bodies react differently, so while to many cycling has no effect on them in terms of the nether regions, it does to others.

I trust this helps.
Good luck and best regards
flan48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-16, 11:34 AM   #9
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Bikes: 1982 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser
Posts: 3,207
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike!..............
Quote:
Originally Posted by flan48 View Post
........Before you get too panicky, I can relate to you my experience:
In June of last year my PSA suddenly spiked from my normal 2.3/2.4 to 4.8. The 4.8 in of itself is not that terrible, the concern is the large jump. The urologist suggested a re-test in 1 month. He did say that cycling could cause an irritation of the prostate...........
flan48--what you were told by your urologist is what any well informed doctor would have told MB. He should not have been told to stay off his bike. Thus my suggestion to find a new doctor.
OldTryGuy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-16, 04:49 AM   #10
flan48
Senior Member
 
flan48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldTryGuy View Post
flan48--what you were told by your urologist is what any well informed doctor would have told MB. He should not have been told to stay off his bike. Thus my suggestion to find a new doctor.
100% agree!
Best regards
flan48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 04:45 AM   #11
Stadjer
Senior Member
 
Stadjer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Groningen
Bikes: Gazelle rod brakes, Batavus compact, Peugeot hybrid
Posts: 612
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 666 Post(s)
I watched a television program about urological issues with road cyclists and it was not specifically about the prostate. The doctor's advice was to relieve the pressure on that area regularly, both by riding upright for a few minutes, and stop for a break. Also 3 long rides a week left too little time for recovery for older men. A good fitting bike and good saddle desing (hole in it) can also help, but it is de the drop bar or low bar ride position that is bad for the blood flow. Interestingly there was also a former pro in this report and he was asked why this wasn't a problem when he was on a bike 6 hours a day, and he said it was a problem, but they got massaged after every ride and the perinneal area wasn't left out. These are pro cyclists and their 'soigneurs', they don't get giggly about serious cycling matters like beeing seated without pain and a normal functioning body off the bike.
Stadjer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 11:20 AM   #12
ThermionicScott 
Gratuitous glib and snark
 
ThermionicScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: CID
Bikes: 1991 Bianchi Eros, 1964 Armstrong, 1988 Diamondback Ascent, 1988 Bianchi Premio, 1987 Bianchi Sport SX, 1980s Raleigh mixte (hers)
Posts: 14,658
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 596 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stadjer View Post
I watched a television program about urological issues with road cyclists and it was not specifically about the prostate. The doctor's advice was to relieve the pressure on that area regularly, both by riding upright for a few minutes, and stop for a break. Also 3 long rides a week left too little time for recovery for older men. A good fitting bike and good saddle desing (hole in it) can also help, but it is de the drop bar or low bar ride position that is bad for the blood flow. Interestingly there was also a former pro in this report and he was asked why this wasn't a problem when he was on a bike 6 hours a day, and he said it was a problem, but they got massaged after every ride and the perinneal area wasn't left out. These are pro cyclists and their 'soigneurs', they don't get giggly about serious cycling matters like beeing seated without pain and a normal functioning body off the bike.
Pros also ride out of the saddle on occasion, which helps prevent circulation from being blocked for too long at a time. Something that's missed in the "don't mash! sit and spin lower gears 100% of the time!" advice we're subjected to these days.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
There's no such thing as too far.. just lack of time
RUSA #7498

(Photobucket is holding my pictures hostage. If you're interested in seeing one of the missing pictures in an old thread, PM me and I'll attach it.)
ThermionicScott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-16, 07:02 PM   #13
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 2,994
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 584 Post(s)
I ain't a doctor! Let's get that out of the way. However, I am really, really smart. And I have read a lot. And, as an older male, I have had to educate myself about prostate issues. It has not escaped my notice that doctors in general set a very low bar for what constitutes quality of life for most of their patients. Nor is a second opinion always of much use. Doctors are usually more alike than they are different. What people usually experience as a "doctor that gets it" is that the first doctor they saw was a GP or Urologist and the second was an Oncologist or vice versa or whatever. To a hammer most problems look like a nail. To a Urologist, prostate problems look like making life easy for the prostate. Cycling is not the easiest thing for prostates. It might cause an elevated PSA.... and? What? An elevated PSA DOES NOT CAUSE PROSTATE CANCER.

IF cycling is what is causing the elevated PSA in the o.p. it is of no significance whatsoever! If cycling is what is causing the elevated PSA, staying off the bike for as few as four or five days will return the PSA to baseline. A re-test could be done... the results could be enlightening. In the worst case scenario and the PSA did not return to baseline it wouldn't be because cycling in and of itself is to blame! So, no need, IMO to stop or even reduce cycling! It isn't going to change anything or make it any worse (or better).

Ironically, what most experts believe is that a lack of exercise and poor diet are the main contributors to increased prostate cancer risk. Cycling is rarely cited as even a remote cause of prostate cancer. It is, however, a source of exercise. Cycling can cause prostate issues, yes, prostate cancer, no. I used to swear by anatomic saddles but my latest saddle does not have a cut out. It is however, wide and flat and does have a depression where the cut-out would be on an anatomic saddle. I wear padded shorts and take frequent butt breaks on longer rides.

WARNING: Possible TMI. Older American men, especially those without wives and/or girlfriends, neglect their personal plumbing to an unhealthy degree. Doctors readily tell men to stay off the bike, but forget to remind them to stay in the game, flush out the stagnant water in their standpipes with regular applications of attention, manual or otherwise.

Last edited by Leisesturm; 09-26-16 at 08:05 PM.
Leisesturm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-16, 04:29 PM   #14
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 33,742
Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2649 Post(s)
I've learned long ago that it's important to challenge doctors. They may not like you for it, but the reality is that patients who don't challenge their doctors don't fare as well as those who force them to rethink and justify their opinions.

People get lazy and sloppy, especially when overworked and trying to do as much as possible in as short a time as possible. Doctors are no exception to this, and if pushed, will admit that they don't have the time to treat patients as well as they would otherwise.

So, in your shoes (and I have been in different context) I'd ask the doctor to explain why he wants you off the bike and exactly what harm he believes riding would cause.

Once you have the facts, you can make an INFORMED decision, about the bike, and the implications of a high PSA.

Other than suggesting you are more active about getting the best and most complete advice, I can't help you since I certainly have less information about your case that you or your doctor.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-16, 09:32 PM   #15
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East
Posts: 1,632
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 145 Post(s)
Test ride a recumbent bike or trike. Your prostate will love it.

Lots of information out there from legitimate (non-anecdotal) sources like
https://www.prostatitis.org/bikeprostate.html
4 Ways Cycling Affects Male Cyclists 'Down There' | Bicycling
Prostate Problems & Cycling | LIVESTRONG.COM
VegasTriker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-16, 12:54 PM   #16
Currmudge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 160
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
If you don't want to follow Vegas' advice and go "bent", look at a Selle SMP Trk saddle; dropped nose, cutout starts within the drop, and goes all the way back.

My saddle time before any numbness set in DOUBLED with this saddle, and the women's version has rescued me in my forced upright position now.

eBay, less than $80 in many cases.
Currmudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-16, 09:09 PM   #17
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 4,714
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 436 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
I had a high PSA reading this Spring on a Prostate exam. The doctors have told me to stay off of my bike! Needless to say...I don't like that advice! I'm used to riding an average of 1,500 to 2,000 miles during the riding season in Ohio. I've reluctantly obeyed the doctors advice, but I miss my bike! Does anyone out there have any advice on an alternate style saddle that would relieve the pressure off of the Nether Region which in turn should relieve pressure off of the prostate gland. I have been using a Brooks B-17 for several years now, and find it to be comfortable. I know there are some "new" saddle designs out there, and wonder if anyone has tried a saddle out of the ordinary due to similar Nether Region problems. All comments/suggestions are very welcome.
Riding before PSA testing can raise the PSA. I was scheduled for a PSA exam, and the urologist told me to stay of the bike for 5 days before the exam. I forgot about his instructions and rode 2 back to back 50 milers the 2 days before the exam. Sure enough, it raised my PSA by about 50%. Ask your urologist what is his objective of keeping you of the bike. If it is to get an good PSA estimate, a much shorter time might be appropriate.

Last edited by Doug64; 12-30-16 at 09:13 PM.
Doug64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-16, 09:38 PM   #18
markjenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 987
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Ask a lot of hard questions before implementing a doctor's recommendation. Staying off the bike for a few days prior to the PSA test in an effort to improve it's accuracy is certainly Okay, but giving up an effective exercise regimen to lower the score is ridiculous. Especially given how unreliable PSA scores are to begin with.

Speaking of which, it bears repeating that the agency in charge of making overall recommendations on screening tests now recommends AGAINST PSA testing all together. This should be another indicator not to let the tail wag the dog by giving up something with clear health benefits in the hopes of lowering the score of a dubious screening test.

https://www.uspreventiveservicestask...ncer-screening

I would explore "slotted" saddle options, regardless of PSA scores. Blood restriction with long hours in the saddle is a fact and the new saddles do help to some degree.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-17, 08:24 PM   #19
1 Miyata Biker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Northwest Ohio
Bikes: Schwinns and Miyatas
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by flan48 View Post
Hi Miyata,
Before you get too panicky, I can relate to you my experience:
In June of last year my PSA suddenly spiked from my normal 2.3/2.4 to 4.8. The 4.8 in of itself is not that terrible, the concern is the large jump. The urologist suggested a re-test in 1 month. He did say that cycling could cause an irritation of the prostate. So for 5 days prior to the re-test I stayed off of the bike and, wala, a PSA of 2.4.

Then 6 months later, and this past June I went through the same routine and sure enough, the PSA is at 2.4.

So, assuming your doctor will prescribe a retesting, stay off of the bike for 4 or 5 days prior to the test and see what happens. We're all different and our bodies react differently, so while to many cycling has no effect on them in terms of the nether regions, it does to others.

I trust this helps.
Good luck and best regards
Your PSA is nicely in the "normal" range. That's great! I was just re-tested and my PSA is still in the high 8. 5 range. Not much of a change from the 8.8 result about 6 months ago. I'm going to try the new Brooks C15 Cambium Carved seat to see if I get get some comfort from that style of seat. It's a rubber shell that is supposed to have great "flex" compared to the leather models, so I'm going to try it to get back on my my again. Hope it works. I'll be having another PSA test later in 2017, so I should get some "seat time" to see what that does to the results.
1 Miyata Biker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-17, 08:31 PM   #20
1 Miyata Biker
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Northwest Ohio
Bikes: Schwinns and Miyatas
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currmudge View Post
If you don't want to follow Vegas' advice and go "bent", look at a Selle SMP Trk saddle; dropped nose, cutout starts within the drop, and goes all the way back.

My saddle time before any numbness set in DOUBLED with this saddle, and the women's version has rescued me in my forced upright position now.

eBay, less than $80 in many cases.
I took your advice about looking into the Selle SMP Trk saddles as I don't think a "Bent" is my cup of tea! Too low for me, especially if one has to deal with large dogs along the way. I would feel like "Alpo" to some of the dogs I come across when sitting low to the road! I'm also looking at the new Brooks C15 Cambium Carved that has a center cutout and is made of rubber for better "flexing" while riding. I may need to experiment with a couple different seats to see which works best.
1 Miyata Biker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-17, 08:35 PM   #21
grizzly59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
... the agency in charge of making overall recommendations on screening tests now recommends AGAINST PSA testing all together ...- Mark
Not trying to pick a fight, but-

1) Mayo Clinic would disagree
2) I would be dead
grizzly59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-17, 06:30 PM   #22
markjenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 987
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by grizzly59 View Post
1) Mayo Clinic would disagree
Okay, but the Mayo Clinic has no final authority in this discussion. They're another opinion. That's my point; this is not a black/white issue and requires a subtle tradeoff between a very slight (at best) reduction in morbidity vs. significant side effects. The Mayo Clinic is not that one that should be making this tradeoff; individuals should and they should have all the data.

Quote:
2) I would be dead
I'm glad you're alive but you don't know this and if a doctor has told you this (in these definitive terms) then he is flat-out lying to you, probably to justify an intervention. There is no way to definitively know whether any given case of prostate cancer, even those that doctor's think are "aggressive" would actually cause a premature death. I quote the source above:

"There is adequate evidence that the benefit of PSA screening and early treatment ranges from 0 to 1 prostate cancer deaths avoided per 1000 men screened."

This is what the data says. Might you be the 1 in 1000? Perhaps, there is just no way to know.

- Mark

Last edited by markjenn; 01-04-17 at 06:35 PM.
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-17, 06:54 PM   #23
flan48
Senior Member
 
flan48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1 Miyata Biker View Post
Your PSA is nicely in the "normal" range. That's great! I was just re-tested and my PSA is still in the high 8. 5 range. Not much of a change from the 8.8 result about 6 months ago. I'm going to try the new Brooks C15 Cambium Carved seat to see if I get get some comfort from that style of seat. It's a rubber shell that is supposed to have great "flex" compared to the leather models, so I'm going to try it to get back on my my again. Hope it works. I'll be having another PSA test later in 2017, so I should get some "seat time" to see what that does to the results.
Ok, sounds like a plan, but I strongly feel that you should stay off the bike for 4-5 days prior to the re-test.
Good luck and best regards
flan48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-17, 05:11 AM   #24
OldTryGuy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: SW Fl.
Bikes: 1982 Custom Touring Paramount, 1983 Road Paramount, 2013 Giant Propel Advanced SL3, 2002 Magna 7sp hybrid, 1976 Bassett Racing 45sp Cruiser
Posts: 3,207
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
Okay, but the Mayo Clinic has no final authority in this discussion. They're another opinion. That's my point; this is not a black/white issue and requires a subtle tradeoff between a very slight (at best) reduction in morbidity vs. significant side effects. The Mayo Clinic is not that one that should be making this tradeoff; individuals should and they should have all the data.



I'm glad you're alive but you don't know this and if a doctor has told you this (in these definitive terms) then he is flat-out lying to you, probably to justify an intervention. There is no way to definitively know whether any given case of prostate cancer, even those that doctor's think are "aggressive" would actually cause a premature death. I quote the source above:

"There is adequate evidence that the benefit of PSA screening and early treatment ranges from 0 to 1 prostate cancer deaths avoided per 1000 men screened."

This is what the data says. Might you be the 1 in 1000? Perhaps, there is just no way to know.

- Mark

My PSA went from 11 to 14. My PSA was FAR LOWER than many men have. My Gleason Score was 5+5. Can't get ANY HIGHER GLEASON score. The PSA does not prove that one has cancer but it does indicate that an issue may exist. How one proceeds with the information that becomes available is a personal choice. Some men bury their head in the sand and some take active measures. Some like bents, some like diamond frames. What ever floats your boat. Only time will tell if my cancer was caught before it metastasized as it could be the mets that can kill me.
OldTryGuy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-17, 11:58 AM   #25
markjenn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 987
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldTryGuy View Post
Some men bury their head in the sand and some take active measures.
Reviewing all the available data and deciding that PSA testing is not something you want to do is not "burying their head in the sand." It's actively managing one's personal risk vs. reward tradeoff and making your own decisions rather than relying on doctors and a health-care system that may have a completely different agenda than yours.

- Mark
markjenn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:06 PM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION