Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-06-17, 02:32 PM   #1
Ninagb
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Limited Knee Flexion

I've loss some knee flexion after a knee replacement. I'm unable to pedal normally with that leg. I point my toe and am able to get around but it's quite uncomfortable. I've also raised my seat a bit more than it should be. I'm looking for any ideas I might try or adaptions to my bike that might help me pedal without pointing my foot/toe to get around.
Ninagb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-17, 03:16 PM   #2
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,987
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 624 Post(s)
A few ideas: shorter cranks, Ride2 crank shorteners, a mid-foot riding position...

Maybe, have the knee checked out. There could be something wrong with it that needs to be looked into.
McBTC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-17, 03:18 PM   #3
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,987
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 624 Post(s)
How much bend do you have?
McBTC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-17, 03:59 PM   #4
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.
Posts: 17,733
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 581 Post(s)
Short crank arms are the standard fix for limited knee ROM. How long are your current cranks?

Road cranks are often available as short as 165mm, with some companies (i.e. Spécialtiés TA) offer arms as short as 155mm. If you need them even shorter, BMX crank arms are available down to 110mm, but might need some tweaking to work on a road bike.

If you're working with a physical therapist post-surgery, they can help determine how short you need to go.
JohnDThompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-17, 05:43 AM   #5
Ninagb
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Bikes:
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninagb View Post
I've loss some knee flexion after a knee replacement. I'm unable to pedal normally with that leg. I point my toe and am able to get around but it's quite uncomfortable. I've also raised my seat a bit more than it should be. I'm looking for any ideas I might try or adaptions to my bike that might help me pedal without pointing my foot/toe to get around.
Thanks for the ideas. I'm having a shorter crank put on today. Can't wait to see how much difference it makes.
Ninagb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-17, 10:37 AM   #6
McBTC
Senior Member
 
McBTC's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1,987
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 624 Post(s)
What length are you going with and how many degrees of bend do you have to work with?
McBTC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-17, 06:09 PM   #7
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 33,740
Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2645 Post(s)
IMO - your best bet is to work with a physical therapist to reestablish more knee movement. The usual issue isn't lack of range of motion per se, but range of motion with load. That can often be remedied by using lower gears, possibly combined with a shorter crank on one side.

But the long term goal should be to get the range back, and that should trump being able to ride the bike more easily in the short term.

When I first started in the bicycle bi almost 50 years ago, I used to work with a surgeon who repaired knees for top athletes. This was before the scope, so it was heavy surgery with a long recovery process. He believed in using bicycling as part of the recovery process, and I'd set up bikes with limited low gearing so they couldn't work harder than intended, and fit guys who came into the store on crutches or in a wheel chair, so they could ride a bike out. But the key was controlled movement at low low load, and as they improved, he'd send them back for me to adjust the gearing to allow a bit more load.

BTW - depending on the details, you might get by by raising the saddle higher than normal, so the knee's flex cycle, is shifted to the straighter end of the range. This will work, but you'll be reaching, and might get excessive rocking at the hip, so it may not be well suited for longer distances. It may be worth a shot, though.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:40 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION