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-   Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/)
-   -   How Many Of You Have A Disability? (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/194939-how-many-you-have-disability.html)

librarian 02-23-07 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maelstrom
My "disability" is a physically misformed hand. My left hand is about 30% smaller than my right. My first finger and pinky are missing the 2st knuckle (imagine 3 thumbs) and the 2 middle fingers are "cut off" where the first knuckle would be. .

My wife has about the same thing. Never really could use a 10 speed. I built her up a bike with flat bars. Put a grip shift and a MTB thumb shifter on the right side along with a dual cable break lever from a tandem that controls front and back brakes at the same time. Still dosen't bike a lot but when she does, she can use the bike to it's full potential.

Maelstrom 02-23-07 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by librarian
My wife has about the same thing. Never really could use a 10 speed. I built her up a bike with flat bars. Put a grip shift and a MTB thumb shifter on the right side along with a dual cable break lever from a tandem that controls front and back brakes at the same time. Still dosen't bike a lot but when she does, she can use the bike to it's full potential.

I had considered doing this, but for dh you need to be able to control both. I simply inverted the brakes (left lever for rear brake) as you need a lot less stopping power in the rear. I think the biggest issue is when I ride with one finger on the brake, I only have my pinky holding my hand on the bar haha

cuda2k 02-23-07 11:14 AM

At one of the local charity rides I saw a rider on a flat bar roadie that was an amputee, one arm at the elbow. He had more bike control on one of the sketchier downhills than I did. Earned my respect for just being on a bike, but seeing how well he was able to control it was an inspirtation.

I've been fairly lucky thus far in life. Had a healthy childhood over all, and nothing that I would consider a disability. I did have a bout with skin cancer, and extensive reconstructive surgery on my jaw to correct my bite. I just cross my fingers I continue to be so lucky.

feba 02-23-07 09:48 PM

Well, I was formally diagnosed and drugged up for ADHD and Bipolar when I was in elementary, although it was really, in my opinion, 99% bull**** excuse to sell ritalin. From what i've read, if I had to diagnose myself with anything, it would be asperger's or autism or something along those lines, but I doubt it- i'm basically 'normal', if slightly odd. I wouldn't even really call myself eccentric.

If I had to list my 'disabilities' it would be my very poor sense of, well, scent- I can barely smell anything unless it's right under my nose, or freshly cooked food. This has it's benefits though, as anyone who's travelled through iowa's highways will agree ^^ My short-term memory is also sketchy at times, although that's greatly improved since I stopped taking the above mentioned drugs, and isn't really noticible anymore(compare to 5 years ago, when I would sometimes walk right out the front door in the morning, and not only forget to lock it, but forget to even close it, right after I had been reminded!) My memory of anything that wasn't fairly major more than about two or three years ago is practically nonexistant, although I remember things I'd learned then, so it doesn't really matter. The only thing
i'd REALLY call a disability however would be my weight- obesity is depressingly restricting. Having a hard time moving your own weight or fitting into your own clothes is awful.

Robert C 09-09-07 06:56 PM

Yah, I know, dredging up an 'ole thread and all (but it has already been resuscitated a few times already). I have mild CP (mild enough that it was not diagnosed until I was already in the Army, where I was promptly booted out with non-veteran status due to pre-existing condition). Yes, I go look, and walk, a little funny. I am a bit grumpy about it because it is just enough to mess up my life and not enough to get any points for.

The real problem is my knee. It just plain hurts to walk at times (I am now over 40); so, riding is great. I keep wondering if I can get a letter from my doctor that would identify the bicycle as a mobility device. Has anyone ever tried?

Bionic Pammy 09-09-07 07:51 PM

Since 1991, I've had 8 spinal surgeries which include 2 laminectomies, 3 lumbar fusions, torn fascia repair , Marlex mesh implantation, adhesiolysis, and multiple minor procedures. I was told by my Dr's in the early 90's that i would never be able to ride a bike, work or walk normally again. I didn't accept that and worked my butt off to be able to ride again. I now have an implanted intrathecal (morphine) pump and it helps quite a bit with the spinal pain. (That's where the "Bionic" part of my handle comes from).
In 2000, I tore the ligaments holding my sacroiliac joint together and now have major hyper-mobility issues there. Two weeks ago I re-sprained my right SI joint and have been in some of the worst pain I've ever experienced since then. Until the cortisone injection I had kicks in, I'm on a pain cocktail of Percocet, Dilauded, and Valium. Yuck!
Robert - one of my spinal surgeons fused me in a slight flexion (forward) position so I could possibly ride again. He's the one who labeled me the "Endorphin Junkie". Thanks to him and my extreme bullheadedness, I'm back to riding hard with the guys.

CdCf 09-09-07 10:20 PM

Mild scoliosis and kyphosis. My left leg is shorter than my right, by about 1/2 to 2/3 of an inch.

My self-diagnosed ADD (ADHD-I) doesn't count in my opinion, since ADD doesn't affect cycling in any way. But others have listed it, so...

pj7 09-09-07 10:32 PM

I have Tourette Syndrome. I have it *somewhat* under control and can sometimes hold it in long enough to get thru a new meeting with people and them never have a clue.
I also suffer from Cluster Headaches (suicide headaches) that started about 5 years ago. This can be so disabling that I have to stay in my hom on an oxygen tank and popping steroids for days at a time.
One of my doctors at the headache institute in Ann Arbor has a theory that the two are linked because there is some evidence that both are caused by something with the hypothalamus.

One of the benefits of having Tourette's is that it causes me to think in different ways than most people and to concentrate on mundane things. In fact, I know how many bubbles were at the top of my soda bottle a few minutes ago, and was using that number to play math games in my head. And I can't help but do it, I have to do it.




Oh, and I'm married.

mirage1 09-09-07 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bionic Pammy (Post 5238880)
Since 1991, I've had 8 spinal surgeries which include 2 laminectomies, 3 lumbar fusions, torn fascia repair , Marlex mesh implantation, adhesiolysis, and multiple minor procedures. I was told by my Dr's in the early 90's that i would never be able to ride a bike, work or walk normally again. I didn't accept that and worked my butt off to be able to ride again. I now have an implanted intrathecal (morphine) pump and it helps quite a bit with the spinal pain. (That's where the "Bionic" part of my handle comes from).
In 2000, I tore the ligaments holding my sacroiliac joint together and now have major hyper-mobility issues there. Two weeks ago I re-sprained my right SI joint and have been in some of the worst pain I've ever experienced since then. Until the cortisone injection I had kicks in, I'm on a pain cocktail of Percocet, Dilauded, and Valium. Yuck!
Robert - one of my spinal surgeons fused me in a slight flexion (forward) position so I could possibly ride again. He's the one who labeled me the "Endorphin Junkie". Thanks to him and my extreme bullheadedness, I'm back to riding hard with the guys.

Pammy, you have my most sincere admiration. I have back troubles (too many years picking up heavy things when I thought I was invincible) and it can be so debilitating--but it's a drop in the bucket compared to what you've overcome.

The phrase "tore the ligaments holding my sacroiliac joints together" about made me come out of my seat. Yeouch!!

Robert C 09-09-07 11:10 PM

Has anyone with different length legs (mine is about 2cm) ever tried different length crank arms? I find that no matter what I do, after a few weeks of riding, my seat will always be canted to one side.

CdCf 09-09-07 11:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert C (Post 5240047)
Has anyone with different length legs (mine is about 2cm) ever tried different length crank arms? I find that no matter what I do, after a few weeks of riding, my seat will always be canted to one side.

My leg length difference doesn't seem to affect my riding at all. Never had a problem with it.

gbcb 09-10-07 04:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert C (Post 5240047)
Has anyone with different length legs (mine is about 2cm) ever tried different length crank arms? I find that no matter what I do, after a few weeks of riding, my seat will always be canted to one side.

I don't have different leg lengths, but because of my particular amputation, my right "knee" joint isn't at the same height as my actual knee, and I have a reduced range of motion.

When I was a kid, I used a shorter crank on one side to make up for the fact I can't bend my right leg more than about 90 degrees. I've since found that if my seat is at the proper height and if I move my right foot's clipless cleats back (or just put my foot farther forward on the pedal), I don't need to change the crank length. This is especially great on climbs out of the saddle... the short crank really kills your power!

powerhouse 05-18-11 02:02 PM

In my original post at the start of this thread, I stated "Disabilities can seriously affect who people are and what they do in life. Even in this day and age society is long on what people with disabilities are unable to do and short on means and alternatives to compensate."

I mentioned my disabilities of legal blindness brought on by Toxoplasmosis (before birth), Epilepsy (1983), Glaucoma (2007) and what I do to compensate for them. I neglected to mention that disabilities can affect people in unexpected and unfortunate ways. For example, eyedrops in themselves didn't hold back the effects of Glaucoma. I have had to go through several procedures of eye surgery. While recovering each time, life sucked as I had to live like a couch potato and not do anything that could cause pressure to the eye (bicycling included). Today I live normally with a degree of bluriness in the left eye. To compensate, the lenses to my Ocutech (eyeglasses) have been updated and I'm back to bicycling again.

I know I revived an old thread, but for those of you who are new, I'll ask the questions again;

Do you have a disability?
What do you do or have done to compensate for it.

I welcome your discussion.

MillCreek 05-18-11 02:28 PM

I have a significant bilateral hearing loss. I sometimes wonder if I will ever hear the car that runs me over.

____asdfghjkl 05-18-11 04:33 PM

I'm only deaf in my left ear. that's about it i guess.

I've always heard it's rude to say "handicap"
ok, I'm going to hide in a corner now.

c0urt 05-18-11 05:31 PM

Raises hand, another epileptic.

Severe epilepsy, but it isn't photosensitive. I have to watch my weight I have to stay about a certain level, and when you have seizures you lose a lot of weight. Also shake and move constantly in my sleep. Wake up in pain most of the time. I almost all of the time hear noise.
Twitcty kind of Tourette's few other things.
Scar on brain in auditory and writing sector. I have time placing words with thoughts. No good for a English nerd. I miss words while writing and talking and talking alot, or say and write them twice, micro seizures. Even more so under stress.
And if someone scares me or loud noises I am prone to seizures.
or If I burn to many calories at once it is possible for me to have a seizure.
or get too stressed out or something makes me to unhappy.....the list goes on.
so comfort food really means comfort food.

a lot of you saw the pic from where I ripped my ear off and had it put back on because of a seizure on my bike.

JonnyHK 05-18-11 05:56 PM

Jeez, ain't I the boring one.

One leg is slightly longer than the other. Borderline problem - apparently the Doc would consider it a problem at more than 12mm, but I'm just about on that. Always wondered why I swam in circles as a kid.

Gives me some muscle problems in the lower spine, hips and thighs. Basic stuff I can look after with stretching and some physio. 27 years of rowing hasn't helped much either...

Indyv8a 05-18-11 06:04 PM

I have fought a running battle with clinical depression. It probably first really effected me after my father died. I was 13. I managed to cope with that, mostly, with light doses of Prozac until about 6 years ago. At that point, I nearly lost two fingers to a table saw, and I have been on a roller coaster since.

It takes a lot of energy to just overcome the minor stresses and inconveniences of daily life. I have been on cocktails of anti-depressants, to the point where they were making me vomit several times a week. I ended up taking myself off the meds, but that led to another bout of depression. I think for me, recently, the worst part of depression has been the overwhelming anger. Little, stupid things leave me ready to yell and scream.

Cycling has been a great help, when I can overcome lethargy brought on by the depression. I am just returning to the bike from a year-long hiatus. My goal, as you can see in my sig is to ride my first century, and make a contribution to cancer research. I am finding having a positive goal to reach for has helped me get moving and taken my focus away from stressors related to work and family.

Would I consider myself truly disabled? Well, not in a traditional sense. Has it added a level of difficulty to my life? Yes, it has.

tizeye 05-18-11 07:16 PM

I am a disabled veteran due to several issues.

Wordbiker 05-18-11 07:19 PM

I have a disability to pass up pie when it's offered.

no1mad 05-18-11 07:30 PM

Like the OP, I have glaucoma. I've been glasses since like the 3rd grade. When contacts become the rage when I was still a teen, my Doc at the time didn't like the results from the little air gun test and sent me to a specialist, who in turn said there was only one guy in the whole friggin' state that was qualified to help. Two laser surgeries and one procedure on the right eye when I turned 18 to create a permanent drain- the visual acuity suffered big time from that procedure and I refused to let him touch the left eye.

Been dealing with it for roughly 25 years now, mostly unmanaged. Flash forward to the end of 2008. Company had me making nightly runs down the turnpike, and my wife was concerned. Got checked out. The Dr. turned white when he found out what I was doing to make a living. Declared me legally blind, informed me that by law I shouldn't be driving with my vision. Though still with that company, I ended up taking a demotion, lost $2/hr pay, and had my hours reduced. I think my boss at the time was trying to make me quit by cutting my hours back like that...

Unlike the OP, the Dr. wholeheartedly agreed with my interest in cycling, as we were both concerned with the possibility of the onset of Type 2 diabetes (my mom was diagnosed with it about 10 years ago). He just stipulated that I couldn't ride anything like the Tour de France guys, i.e.- drops. And my wife was standing there when he said that, so everytime I start lusting after a drop bar bike, she just gives me that look- ya know?

redneckwes 05-18-11 07:45 PM

This thread is full of hero's, roll on folks!

gitarzan 05-18-11 09:49 PM

Diabetes is trying to have it way with me, and I have a good size dose of ADD. I learned to manage the ADD a long time ago, before I knew I had it. Also red-green color blind as hell. I tend to almost totally fail color blindness tests. I'll miss 19 out of 24 cards in a CB test.

Lastly, Secondary Adrenal Insuffiency, resulting from pituitary tumor treatment. It's well managed with pills and shots but I still have to worry about how I will feel everyday. Can I ride 50 miles? Or crap out at 5 miles. I may feel great for weeks but then bonk fast or have a hypo-tension episode. Could be a hella lot worse. I was the reason I sold the motorcycles and got back on bicycles. So that's good!

Tom Stormcrowe 05-18-11 11:40 PM

Diabetic, SA-Node irregularity that causes me to have periodic bouts of Atrial Fibrillation, Lupus (Causes arthritis, kidney disease among other things, and UV light causes me to break out in a blotchy red rash that will start bleeding). Also, a pituitary disorder called Empty Sella Syndrome and some hypothyroidism due to thyroid nodules.

All in all, though, I just live day to day and treat each as if it were my last. No regrets, no worries, and live fully.

Sixty Fiver 05-19-11 12:20 AM

I have a diagnosis of CMS (Chronic Myofascial Pain Syndrome) and a side of permanent nerve damage in my lower back which affects the nerves in my left leg and is the cause of the CMS... my bio-mechanics are all messed up... have limited feeling below the knee and can't feel 2/3 of my left foot so have balance issues, have trouble walking, standing time is limited, cannot sit upright for any length of time and am not supposed to lift anything more than 20 pounds because of compression and axial loading issues.

This causes chronic fatigue as I do not sleep well and my memory is not as sharp as it used to be... have experienced some severe depression when things were at their worst and for a time never thought I would ever be able to ride a bicycle.

It has caused immense financial stress (used to have a 60k/year job and usually worked a second job) as before I started receiving and disability benefits I had to tap into my savings and am unable to work full time or for a full day as there is no consistency to my health.

Some days are bad and some days would be unbearable if I did not know that I would get some reprieve from the pain.

Also have a lot of stress because my condition was caused or worsened by mis-applied treatment and have been battling with the compensation board for three years and despite overwhelming medical evidence they are entrenched in their position and refuse to acknowledge that I had anything more than a minor back strain injury.

I have a great partner who is happy this injury did not affect the fun bits and if things had gone another way I might be in a wheelchair so count myself as being pretty lucky... have some great friends... and the world's greatest kids.

Last year I rode nearly 10,000 km and although I am struggling more this year am still knocking down at least 20 km a day and have completed a few 100 km rides... cycling has been the best therapy as it reduces pain and spasms and has allowed me to stay in pretty good physical shape.

It is what it is and know that many people are in worse shape than I am... I run my own small bicycle repair and wheel building shop and sell vintage parts and have been apprenticing with a master frame builder so that I can perfect my brazing skills. I work when I can and my partner understands I have health limitations, as does he.

Building frames has been a lifelong dream for me... will not let my body keep me from doing this.

Have had to adapt my working technique as I was once a pretty powerful little guy and worked as a machinist but now have to use levers and aids to do what used to be pretty light work and need to built a bike lift to get things up off the floor.

Someday, I want to open a proper shop and have some partners who want to do this who know I can't do as much as I used to but when I do what I do, there are few people who are better at it.


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