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-   Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/)
-   -   How Many Of You Have A Disability? (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/194939-how-many-you-have-disability.html)

greyghost_6 05-19-11 02:46 AM

I too have a leg that is shorter but due to a severe femur break when I was 6. Not much to quantify for a longer crank arm length or anything, but its there. On a comical note my "3rd" "leg" is also not quite as long as I wish it were either but this is due to genetics, but I have not put much thought into correcting it, but have gotten no real complaints. (Im going to regret this in the morning)

mnemia 05-22-11 09:47 AM

I have Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, or CMT. It's a hereditary peripheral neuropathy that causes your nerves to degenerate starting, typically, in your toes and sometimes fingers and slowly progressing upwards (affects about 1 in 3500 people, but the kind I have is much rarer). The main symptom of this is loss of sensation in the feet, loss of balance from inability to feel when your feet touch the ground, and muscle weakness/atrophy that progresses upwards in the legs. The muscle weakness/loss, in turn, causes structural deformities in the feet and legs. Basically, I have an extremely high arch (like, way higher than ANY normal person), toes that often curl under, and an inability to gain much muscle tone in my calves no matter how much I work them out.

In order to cope with this, I normally wear AFOs (ankle-foot-orthotics) when I'm wearing regular shoes. These are basically semi-rigid carbon fiber leg braces that go up my shins and wrap around my calves, and connect to a rigid foot plate under my feet. Over the foot pad is a custom-designed orthotic foot pad that supports my very high arch. These braces prevent my foot from just sort of "flopping", which they would otherwise have a tendency to do due to the muscle weakness, and allow me to walk mostly normally.

I got back into cycling in part in order to exercise my legs and gain as much muscle tone as possible while I still can (as having stronger upper leg muscles helps to compensate for the weak calves). I can actually bike much more easily than I can walk, because I don't require the same kind of balance that I have problems with (at least when I'm clipped in). Balancing on a bike is more based on inner ear and vision, while balancing while walking requires that you can feel your feet, too. The only real problems I have are that due to my extreme lack of balance I have more problems with dismounting and mounting safely (I'm not able to stand on one leg while unsupported for even a few seconds, which means that it's quite hard for me to get my leg over the bike unless I have something to hold onto with my arm while doing it). Also, because my calves are so weak, I can't stand up on my pedals for very long (and I couldn't do it at all for over a year after I got back into biking). That's not much of a problem though, because I can spin my way up any hill on a paved road while in the saddle (my upper leg muscles are stronger than most people's, because I have to solely rely on them for most of my walking and biking). And, of course, I had to get some custom orthotics made for my bike shoes. One of the more amusing parts of my condition is the extreme contrast in the size of my upper and lower legs.

Anyway, I'm convinced that if I can bike for transportation, 99% of the population would be physically able to if they put some effort into it.

skijor 05-22-11 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redneckwes (Post 12662050)
This thread is full of hero's, roll on folks!

+1000
I feel fortunate to be in reasonably good health.

powerhouse 05-24-11 03:53 AM

This is a really great thread.

Sixty Fiver 09-18-11 11:30 PM

Little update...

The body is still messed up but have finally seen a little light as after winning an appeal against the WCB, they have finally accepted fiduciary responsibility for their failure to act accordingly and should be receiving retroactive benefits for the past 4 years as well as a benefit guarantee and coverage for pretty much anything I may need in the way of physio, medications, and supports for things I cannot do.

And a month ago I married the love of my life.

Neil_B 09-19-11 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 13245767)
Little update...

The body is still messed up but have finally seen a little light as after winning an appeal against the WCB, they have finally accepted fiduciary responsibility for their failure to act accordingly and should be receiving retroactive benefits for the past 4 years as well as a benefit guarantee and coverage for pretty much anything I may need in the way of physio, medications, and supports for things I cannot do.

And a month ago I married the love of my life.

Bravo! and Congratulations!

boneshake 09-19-11 09:34 AM

The only disability I have that affects cycling is my kids'. She has Down syndrome. That affects her balance, strength, and most importantly, her motivation. So as of now, the only bike riding she does is when I'm dragging her on a trail-a-bike. So that's how it affects my cycling. Damn she's getting heavy too.

Tom Stormcrowe 09-19-11 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boneshake (Post 13247208)
The only disability I have that affects cycling is my kids'. She has Down syndrome. That affects her balance, strength, and most importantly, her motivation. So as of now, the only bike riding she does is when I'm dragging her on a trail-a-bike. So that's how it affects my cycling. Damn she's getting heavy too.


You might want to consider "Buddy Bike", bone. You might even be able to get the purchase covered by your insurance as a therapeutic device if your daughter qualifies. I am not kidding, here.
http://buddybike.com/FundingOptions.html

boneshake 09-19-11 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13247614)
You might want to consider "Buddy Bike", bone. You might even be able to get the purchase covered by your insurance as a therapeutic device if your daughter qualifies. I am not kidding, here.
http://buddybike.com/FundingOptions.html

I thought I had seen everything, but nope. This is very cool! Thanks for cluing me in. That's what this forum is for.

Maybe I could build something a bit like this on my own too.

Sixty Fiver 09-19-11 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 13246190)
Bravo! and Congratulations!

Thanks... there is still a ways to go on things and some immigration paperwork that needs to get filed so I can ride with my best friend every day.

GraysonPeddie 09-19-11 12:27 PM

I am blind in my left eye and I have pretty good vision in my right eye, but not enough to see traffic lights. The yellow filter glasses does not seem to be of help to me as there are still glare between me and the traffic lights when the sky is clear.

I can hear pretty good, but I'm not used to the sound quality of cell phones unless I use a headset. Well, if only I can compensate that with HD Voice (G722), but if only if we have good support for mobile VoIP but not practical due to high latency when used with LG Optimus V and SipDroid compared to wired broadband at home. Well, I don't think it matters to me when riding my tricycle, as I'd rather just reject a call and call them back as soon as I get off the road. Plus, it's against the law to use my headset. :(

Sixty Fiver 09-19-11 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by boneshake (Post 13247208)
The only disability I have that affects cycling is my kids'. She has Down syndrome. That affects her balance, strength, and most importantly, her motivation. So as of now, the only bike riding she does is when I'm dragging her on a trail-a-bike. So that's how it affects my cycling. Damn she's getting heavy too.

Might be time to look at a nice tandem... our shop has built quite a number of these for children with disabilities and have incorporated features so that they can really enjoy the ride.

Our convertible tandem has an adjustable rear stoker position that allows for the smallest of children to ride without pedal extensions and also allows normal sized adults to ride as stokers.

Have replaced the traditional stoker stems with safety cages or arm braces for individuals who have limited upper body strength and coordination... just built a tandem like this.

Sgt Mac 09-20-11 12:00 AM

Compresive neuropathies right femoral nerve, left femural neuropathy, bilateralpars defects at L5-S1with grade 1 anterolististhes, thoracolumbar spine associated with satus post grade III open femur fracture, degenerative discs C3-C6, cervical spine associated with status post grade III open femur fracture, fracture (crushed) right ankle with internal fixation screws, internal derangement right shoulder associated with post grade III open femur fracture, post open reduction and internal fixation (7screws & a plate) of distal ulna, patella chodromalacia right knee, tinitus, PTSD, & to top it all off, they lied to me prior to surgery, they said they would do a bone graft which would leave my right leg 1/4" shorter. I woke up, no bone graft & my r leg bone marrow was drilled out for the second time, because they screwwed up the 1st time and had a non union of the broken femur ends. I knew there was a non union within days of the sugery, they replied you have so many severed nerves that you just have no control over your muscles & you should have listened to us the first time and had the leg amputated, you would be out of the hospital by now (6 months in hospital, 2 weeks comatose) 3 monthe later they discovered there was a non union of the shatered ends of my femur. So they rerodded me & locked in place with distal screws through the side of my leg and now it's nearly 2" short & about 30+ degrees outwardly pronated. This is my left leg (I) & this is my right (/) except a little more that that or this I/. I was always the most physically fit marine in every unit I was in I was a fitness fanatic I studied kinesiology & nutrition. I received a medical/Honorable discharge from the USMC and I was messed up psychologically as much as physically, there was nothing I could do or so I thought. cycling has saved my health & my life, I used to be on the HS swim team & had the highest swim qualification in the USMC WSQ but I was "lapped" out I had no desire to to do laps ever again. I used to surf too, everything I did there was a level of excitement to it swimming laps is BOOOOORING torture. Then I saw these guys in spandex hogging the roads in my hood for a few yrs. The I got an epiphany, hey I could do that, just forget about the spandex. Well 2 moths of ridding & I feel so much better & I'm wearing spandex. :D

Neil_B 09-20-11 06:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13251046)
The I got an epiphany, hey I could do that, just forget about the spandex. Well 2 moths of ridding & I feel so much better & I'm wearing spandex. :D

Photo or it didn't happen. :-)

T38wheeler 09-20-11 10:11 AM

You are amazing.
Quote:

Originally Posted by powerhouse (Post 2519384)
Disabilities can seriously affect who people are and what they do in life. Even in this day and age, society is long on what s/he is 'unable' to do and short on means and alternatives of compensating for it.

I am a cyclist with three disabilities: I'm legally bind (20/400 acuity), epileptic, and have glaucoma. None of these are badges of honor. However, I've been able to compensate for them fairly well. To address my legal blindness, I wear a special pair of eyeglasses with a small telescope so that I'm able to see traffic, road signs, etc. while riding. This feature earned me the nickname of "Telescope". Medical science has been fortunate enough so that I can keep epileptic seizures at bay (most of the time). As for the glaucoma, I'm able to cope by taking special eyedrops. Due to my eyesight disabilities, Doctors had once recommended that I not take up bicycling. After doing so anyway and successfully completing many long distance bicycling adventures, they now support me in it. I earned my current nickname of Powerhouse from having the ability to ride very fast when I want to and, on long rides, from having the energy to go the distance while leaving other cyclists behind. This is quite something despite having to deal with the disabilities I live with.

I could go on about how my disabilities have affected me in other areas of life (jobs that I am unable to do, activities that aren't possible, etc.) but will keep it to bicycling since that is what this chatroom site is for. You may choose the extent of how much you wish to discuss.

So: How many of you have a disability? What alternatives do you use or how do you compensate?


2manybikes 09-20-11 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by T38wheeler (Post 13252475)
You are amazing.

Yes he is !!! I'm impressed.

Onyxaxe 09-20-11 01:00 PM

Hi. I've been diagnosed with a blanket anxiety disorder and depression. I've been dealing with it since I was 5 and it motivated me to bike instead of drive since I figured I'd be less of a threat to everyone on the road. All of my limbs function correctly 75% of the time. If I get too stressed or whatever my legs straight up give out and everything else follows including the muscles in my face, I have passed out from it a couple times. An episode can last anywhere from 2 mins to 8hrs. It's manageable in a controlled lifestyle of good eating, exercise and good family/friend relationships. I can honestly say I feel blessed since it comes and goes.

Sixty Fiver 09-20-11 01:12 PM

I think that something that is very important about any physical activity is that it is helpful in treating the depression that is often associate with chronic injury / pain / disability.

bikeman715 09-21-11 05:26 PM

I have CP ,and it affect both legs and right hand , good thing I'm a lefty . I ride a bike ( a two wheeler ) . I ride 10 miles a day and I also run my own bicycle repair shop . I know how people feel and act around me .

Singlespeed92 09-21-11 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dolomiti (Post 3907193)
Pardon this thread is so old, but there are no others like it... I found it on a search...

Does anyone here cycle, that is disabled? I mean being unable to support yourself with employment.
People see me cycling often and sometimes think I must not be disabled, because how could a disabled person ride a bicycle :rolleyes:
I have two neurological conditions, and cycling is a BIG help on my quality of life - thanks to conditioning (being inactive is a very bad idea in my case), transportation, and mental satisfaction. I don't have very good endurance or power but good enough to get around and enjoy it sometimes.


Old post,but I just found this thead...THANK YOU! This is eXACTLY the issue tha I deal with the most when I'm feeling up to riding. People don't undertand that "disability" doesn't always mean "disfigurement"...even (especially?) "family". =/

Singlespeed92 09-21-11 09:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 13253476)
I think that something that is very important about any physical activity is that it is helpful in treating the depression that is often associate with chronic injury / pain / disability.


And a BIG THANK YOU to you too :)

jbgmom 09-22-11 08:03 AM

Sons with autism
 
My six year old twins have autism and cognitive delays. They can't pedal yet, but like to be pushed along on a bike with training wheels. A great workout for me, but not too practical! Especially since there are two of them and one of me.

I hope someday they will understand pedaling, steering and safety issues enough to ride an adapted bike. My plan right now is to get them a Wike special needs trailer and tow them around.

I have looked into the Buddy Bike, but we aren't quite ready for that.
This is a great forum!
Alice

jbgmom 09-22-11 08:06 AM

I just posted about my twins with autism.

I also meant to say that I've looked at tandems, but until the twins stop wanting to lie down or try to get off after about five minutes on the bike, I don't think a tandem is for us. Maybe a bicycle rickshaw!

boneshake 09-22-11 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 13245767)
Little update...

The body is still messed up but have finally seen a little light as after winning an appeal against the WCB, they have finally accepted fiduciary responsibility for their failure to act accordingly and should be receiving retroactive benefits for the past 4 years as well as a benefit guarantee and coverage for pretty much anything I may need in the way of physio, medications, and supports for things I cannot do.

And a month ago I married the love of my life.

Awesome. Congrats.

boneshake 09-22-11 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbgmom (Post 13262064)
I just posted about my twins with autism.

I also meant to say that I've looked at tandems, but until the twins stop wanting to lie down or try to get off after about five minutes on the bike, I don't think a tandem is for us. Maybe a bicycle rickshaw!

This may help. It's for a trail-a-bike for kids with balance issues, but it may make a kid with autism stay seated and feel more comfortable. This could make a trailabike an option for you (well, maybe two trailabikes).

http://www.amazon.com/Trail-A-Bike-1.../dp/B000SMS7IC


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