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-   Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/)
-   -   How Many Of You Have A Disability? (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/194939-how-many-you-have-disability.html)

Sixty Fiver 09-27-11 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2manybikes (Post 13284402)
Not too many things better than getting a ride in, taking the dog along, and getting to see the dog enjoy the company of other dogs. Even better if the other dog owners are friendly. I fnd they all are friendly.
Got any photos?

Like bicycles, our pets seem to connect us to one another... my Shih Tzu only had one best dog friend in her life and that was our Minature Pinscher that passed away last fall but she is warming to other dogs and will at least tolerate them. She does not have a mean bone in her body, loves everyone, and for a time she volunteered as a therapy dog for children with disabilities.

Humans are her packmates... :)

She just came back from her morning ride and is bouncing all over the house now wondering where her girls (my daughters) went. My housemate is bouncing around too... cycling does work wonders.

I am heading off to physio but when I come back will upload some pictures...

choteau 09-28-11 09:19 PM

At the age of 21 a L3-L4-L5 emergency decompressive laminectomy, resulting in nerve damage causing loss of use of left foot, weak left hamstring and hip flexors, rotators etc requiring AFO, just for fun +sciatica. The right side footdrop partially compensated by using toe flexors to lift foot "almost to neutral", weak foot extensors and rotators. Roll in the Cauda Equina Syndrome affecting the S1-S2-etc and you get some bowel and bladder etc issues. Fast forward 21 years and the knees and hips are paying the toll also, with bursitus and arthritis caused by over compensating for gimpy legs. Then a C5-C6 disc rupture, first surgery got most of the disc fragments, nine months later (after nerve damage to right tricep, outer forearm, index and thumb) second surgery "found" a bone spur and disc fragments missed the first time. Another 12 years bring us up to date, I ride my old 3 speed between 18 and 30 miles 3-4 times a week. Easier to ride 30 than walk 2. Except for a swagger when I walk (limp) I look "normal". Tim

Sixty Fiver 09-28-11 09:44 PM

choteau - I understand the riding 30 is easier than walking 2 and a lot of people don't get it because "you look normal".

A friend of mine asked how I learned how to do that cool walk (swagger) so I kicked him in the shin.

:D

We had put back a few beers before hand and this is something else I miss... I have almost no tolerance for alcohol any more as it turns me into a total ****.

goagain 09-29-11 07:46 PM

Thanks, all!

Chris516 09-30-11 04:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rona (Post 13262243)
I'm late to introducing myself here, but I'm on the Clyde/Athena forum a bit.

In a nut shell.... I have multiple gunshot wounds. My right butt cheek is pretty much gone and I have lower limb paralysis. I wear an AFO to walk. Like many others, I bike better than I can walk. If wear pants, most people just see a little bit of limping and I pass as "normal" (what ever that is).

When it first happened, I was an athletic active duty member. Now I'm overweight and trying to get back to a better level of fitness. I've recently gone car free about a year ago when I moved in with my new hubby. The worst part is over: learning to bike again, biking my first mile, biking my first 5 miles. Now for me it's biking over 30 miles and watching my eating. I love to eat.

Like some others here, because I pass as "normal" people don't understand that I'm disabled. I can bike but I can't carry or lift well, I struggle with stairs. I don't feel the bottom of my right foot well and often trip. Walking is improving, but not near normal level. Sitting can be uncomfortable with only half a butt. Standing causes swelling in my paralyzed limb. Cold can damage my leg and if my leg gets really cold, once that cold blood hits the rest of my body I can drop temperature very quickly and get chilled.

Biking for me has been a life saver. It gives me a sport I can do and its just plain old awesome.

I was perusing previous answers in this forum, and this answer apart from the particulars, pretty much summed up my life from the day I was born. Like:

1. I bike better than I walk
2. From first glance, I pass as 'normal'(whatever 'normal' is)
3. Due to my brain surgeries causing muscle damage, I walk sort of lethargically. This causes me to trip, so I don't walk very much to get somewhere. Which is why, I almost always ride my bike to get somewhere.

green427 09-30-11 04:49 PM

Ok, I hesitated to sign up here since my disability was heavily debated on other subforums, and many people have some very strong views.

I am legally deaf, and I mean 100% deaf in both ears when I am not wearing my cochlear implants. Have been that way since I was little. I've been riding bicycles since I was little, and logged thousands of miles up until I was 16 years old.

I ride with a group of deaf men & women when I have the chance. Bicycling was one way I could escape the wrath of hearing bullies I've encountered in my youth, and today I still ride. Most of us leave our hearing aids off while riding, and in spite of many people thinking we are insane for doing so, we all survived for the last 40+ years.

Sixty Fiver 09-30-11 05:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13301809)
Ok, I hesitated to sign up here since my disability was heavily debated on other subforums, and many people have some very strong views.

I would refuse to debate with such ignorant people who can probably hear what is going on around them and take for granted how this aids them in navigating and avoiding problems on the road.

choteau 09-30-11 07:52 PM

For many years I used Alcohol as a pain reliever. Imagine that:rolleyes:! But I also suffer from the instant *** just add alcohol.

green427 09-30-11 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver (Post 13302074)
I would refuse to debate with such ignorant people who can probably hear what is going on around them and take for granted how this aids them in navigating and avoiding problems on the road.

Thanks...many people don't realize that when someone loses one of their senses, they adapt by using the other senses.

I still have people that are shocked that I can drive a car, ride a motorcycle, and communicate without hearing a damned thing.

Neil_B 10-01-11 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13301809)
Ok, I hesitated to sign up here since my disability was heavily debated on other subforums, and many people have some very strong views.

Surprise surprise. During a 5k last year a volunteer tried to get me to stop running because of my gait, and when I recounted the story on another subforum I was told I was the person in the wrong.

Just ignore the ahats, including the ones on Bike Forums.

Chris516 10-01-11 02:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 13304311)
Surprise surprise. During a 5k last year a volunteer tried to get me to stop running because of my gait, and when I recounted the story on another subforum I was told I was the person in the wrong.

Just ignore the ahats, including the ones on Bike Forums.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 13304311)
Surprise surprise. During a 5k last year a volunteer tried to get me to stop running because of my gait, and when I recounted the story on another subforum I was told I was the person in the wrong.

Just ignore the ahats, including the ones on Bike Forums.

I have come across the same thing. I have had several discussions that I started on BF, closed for that reason. Because I just kept getting trashed. I was even accused of 'trolling'.

Neil_B 10-01-11 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris516 (Post 13305023)
I have come across the same thing. I have had several discussions that I started on BF, closed for that reason. Because I just kept getting trashed. I was even accused of 'trolling'.

"Trolling" on Bike Forums means "disagreeing with the sheeple." I've been told I need training wheels, I need an electric bicycle to tour, and that it's a surprise "people like me" can ride a bike. I'm sorry you and green427 have had such problems. But I'm no longer surprised.

I try to ignore them. Why would I want to look like everyone else? Or ride like everyone else?

I'm sometimes told I have a big chip on my shoulder. I have to remind people that IS my shoulder!

Chris516 10-01-11 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 13305072)
"Trolling" on Bike Forums means "disagreeing with the sheeple." I've been told I need training wheels, I need an electric bicycle to tour, and that it's a surprise "people like me" can ride a bike. I'm sorry you and green427 have had such problems. But I'm no longer surprised.

I try to ignore them. Why would I want to look like everyone else? Or ride like everyone else?

I'm sometimes told I have a big chip on my shoulder. I have to remind people that IS my shoulder!

I must be wanting too hard, to have a human adult interaction with those that accuse me of 'trolling', instead of childish garbage. What a sad state of humanity.

Neil_B 10-01-11 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris516 (Post 13305767)
I must be wanting too hard, to have a human adult interaction with those that accuse me of 'trolling', instead of childish garbage. What a sad state of humanity.

"Do you think," said Candide, "that mankind always massacred one another as they do now? Were they always guilty of lies, fraud, treachery, ingratitude, inconstancy, envy, ambition, and cruelty? Were they always thieves, fools, cowards, gluttons, drunkards, misers, calumniators, debauchees, fanatics, and hypocrites?"



"Do you believe," said Martin, "that hawks have always been accustomed to eat pigeons when they came in their way?"



"Doubtless," said Candide.



"Well then," replied Martin, "if hawks have always had the same nature, why should you pretend that mankind change theirs?"

FunkyStickman 10-01-11 08:52 PM

Hopefully, this is the last place you will find trolling going on. Thanks for posting up in here, and keep sharing the good experiences!

Peter_C 10-03-11 12:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by powerhouse (Post 2519384)
Disabilities can seriously affect who people are and what they do in life. Even in this day and age, society is long on what s/he is 'unable' to do and short on means and alternatives of compensating for it.

I never *felt* disabled until this last year or so. My 'list' of issues seems to both be growing, and seems to be more invasive every day.

I started having left knee issues at age 13, with my first (of eight) knee surgery in 1979, and my TKR 11-2009. While I limped, and at times dragged my leg, other than riding, it never really stopped me from doing most things I wanted to do. Bowling, roller-skating, ice-skating, and most sports were out by age 16.

Heart issues, OA, shoulder surgery 07-2010, right hip replaced 06-2011, genetic blood disorder that causes PEs, so, due to blood thinners for life, I can no longer take the Anti-inflammatories that I need, so am back in Pain MGNT. The list goes on - but I look normal (for a fat guy) when clothes cover all the surgical scars.

The newest 'feature' is my progressive swallowing disease that is causing weight loss (that's a plus) - hopefully we will have a solution by the time I lose all my weight (am now at 330lbs, down from the 370s, and losing roughly 8-14lbs a month).

I sold my DF and am now on a recumbent trike (tadpole) and am loving it~! Just did a 40 mile ride yesterday, had a blast, but had to sit in my chair all day today, but it's worth it~!

PS - to pick one 'disability' - it would be 'chronic pain' - and that's a tough one not only for the people around me, but for many doctors as well, as "pain" is not something that can be *seen*, and easily proven/understood. But 'pain' does change who a person is after a few or 20 years.

bicyclridr4life 10-03-11 09:28 AM

I have M.H.E. I have seen reports that the "average" person with M.H.E. has 3 to 5 bone spurs. I am above average in at least one aspect of "life" - I have over 384 bone spurs. My knees and hips have been shot since childhood (one Orthopedicsurgon told me he has replaced knees and hips that were better than mine). I am 4th generation in my family to have M.H.E, and was raised to think I can do anything a normal person can (provided it is physically possible for me to move that way). By all rights I should have been in a wheelchair decades ago. I think riding my bikes has kept that chair away. Bicyclerider4life.

Neil_B 10-03-11 10:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by powerhouse (Post 2519384)
Disabilities can seriously affect who people are and what they do in life. Even in this day and age, society is long on what s/he is 'unable' to do and short on means and alternatives of compensating for it.

Which is why the people here are so creative and have the can-do attitude.

Chris516 10-04-11 12:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_C (Post 13310625)
I never *felt* disabled until this last year or so. My 'list' of issues seems to both be growing, and seems to be more invasive every day.

I started having left knee issues at age 13, with my first (of eight) knee surgery in 1979, and my TKR 11-2009. While I limped, and at times dragged my leg, other than riding, it never really stopped me from doing most things I wanted to do. Bowling, roller-skating, ice-skating, and most sports were out by age 16.

Heart issues, OA, shoulder surgery 07-2010, right hip replaced 06-2011, genetic blood disorder that causes PEs, so, due to blood thinners for life, I can no longer take the Anti-inflammatories that I need, so am back in Pain MGNT. The list goes on - but I look normal (for a fat guy) when clothes cover all the surgical scars.

The newest 'feature' is my progressive swallowing disease that is causing weight loss (that's a plus) - hopefully we will have a solution by the time I lose all my weight (am now at 330lbs, down from the 370s, and losing roughly 8-14lbs a month).

I sold my DF and am now on a recumbent trike (tadpole) and am loving it~! Just did a 40 mile ride yesterday, had a blast, but had to sit in my chair all day today, but it's worth it~!

PS - to pick one 'disability' - it would be 'chronic pain' - and that's a tough one not only for the people around me, but for many doctors as well, as "pain" is not something that can be *seen*, and easily proven/understood. But 'pain' does change who a person is after a few or 20 years.

Peter_C, I been 'disabled' all my life, due to the snowball effect of a congenital brain aneurysm. The brain aneurysm(clipped at 9mos.-old now 44yrs.-old) caused hydrocephalus(shunted first at 9mos.-old, had five more surgeries by 9yrs.-old). The surgeries caused epilepsy. But the only absolutely noticeable thing about me was my big head. I say 'was' because, before my sixth aneurysm/shunt surgery in 1976, I always had a big head due to the buildup of CSF(Cerebro-Spinal Fluid). Since then, I haven't had any headaches related to it. I did have a headache that came n' went several times Super Bowl weekend. I originally thought my present(since 1976) shunt gave out, but it was due to exposure from trying to fix the furnace in the house. Yet, I don't have any major or minor disfigurement and I don't have a limp or anything like a limb amputation. So, I sort of know what you mean.

gitarzan 10-04-11 10:24 PM

I had a pituitary tumor debulked about 11 years ago. Three years later it had come back, so they used radiation on it. Several years later as my endocrinal system slowly shut down, I tolerated problems, had some of them treated (poorly I found out) until my adrenal glands stopped and I ended up with Secondary Adrenal Insuffiency (SAI). It's like Addison's disease, the big difference is how you get it. Addisons is primary shutdown of the adrenal glands and SAI is well, secondary. Kind of like the difference between turning off the lights in your house by turning off the switch, or in my case, not paying the electrical bill.

Anyway, it causes sudden onsets of low blood pressure, among other things. I take some pills that help a lot but still I have occasional moments of passing out. They come on with a little warning, but not much. I may have a half hour hour of feeling like crap before I start to drill down and hit the floor. It's slow enough to be a soft landing, however. Plus it's very typical to make bad decisions when it happens. For example I had a spell at work last Wednesday. I got up from my desk, made my way to the canteen without telling anyone, bought breakfast, took one bite, walked away and passed out in a hallway. I got a ride to the ER for that one.

A few years a ago I was training for the TDC. I had trained up to 55 miles once, rode 30 miles for fun every weekend, rode 10 hilly miles every few nights, and often rode to work for a 20 mile round trip. On the day of the ride I was feeling great then about 5 miles out I started feeling funny and after 7 I had to stop and wait for the van. That was humiliating. Funny thing was my endocrinologist was working at the TDC booth when I got back.

Anyway it's mostly an annoyance now, and spells are, if I take all my meds, few and far between. Last one before last Weds was in March. I went over two years before that. Because of them I sold my motorcycles. Before I was untreated I was having episodes about every two weeks and felt like hell in the meantime. Right now, most of the time, I feel great.

eja_ bottecchia 10-04-11 10:53 PM

WOW, I thought that riding with diabetes and asthma was a big deal. After reading some of the stories in this thead, I tip my to all of you who ride in spite of such great odds.

You guys are an inspiration!

Peter_C 10-05-11 10:47 PM

Chris516 - yup, I would think you do.

I would wager that most of us, while knowing there are always people worse off then ourselves, wish at one point or another that our *issues* were different.

Not meaning to come across tacky, or the like, I tend to think someone missing most of a leg wishes (at times) that they were more like me, and vice-versa. Never having lost a limb (or it's use completely) I can only guess what someone that has goes through - but at times, I sometimes think it is worse to have *some* use of a limb. My knees almost 'taunt' me. At various points in time, they will almost work well, and then the weather will change, or God will sneeze, and boom, the pain goes crazy high, and they refuse to work - whereas if I didn't have them (my thinking goes), in time I would get used to the way my life is - because at least the issue is somewhat stable, but as they are, every day is different.

This post is *not* meant as whiny, just trying to put a 'voice' to what bounces around in my head at times. As I get older, my ability to deal with constant pain is getting worse, and frankly I can not see dealing with it for another 30-odd years.

I wonder, if someone loses say, a leg above the knee, after 20-30 years, do they become if not pain-free, do they come close to it, or *stable*, or is "phantom pain" pretty much a for sure thing that never goes away? I assume 'phantom pain' is bout as bad as most other chronic pains?

I know for sure that chronic back pain must be horrible! With the leg (example) many times you can sorta mentally cut it off and remove it from the rest of you - in other words, turning my head doesn't make my knee or hip hurt more, but with spinal issues, most any movement creates pain...

Living with my mother in-law who has been legally-blind for some 20 odd years, has created a awareness of what a lack of vision can mean, and how much people (as a group) take it for granted.

hammandegger 10-08-11 01:59 AM

I don't know if these are official disabilities.

I have a slipped disc in my back that requires constant stretching and other exercises before I go on a ride, and directly after I get done with a ride.

I have cervical osteoarthritis which when it flares up it causes nerves to pinch in my neck radiating pain to down my arms. [I'm in the middle of that right now and can't ride any of my 5 bikes:mad:].

I hate taking medications and I get extremely depressed when I'm not able to ride my bicycles.

My girlfriend swears that I have mental problems, and I'll swear that she does too.

crackerjab 10-09-11 04:20 PM

I saw this sub forum and wanted to share. Anyway... I was in a catastrophic accident on July 12th, 2011. Amongst other injuries, the ones that affected my cycling were a broken tibia in my right leg (3 breaks, all compound) and I broke every bone from my forearm to my fingertips in my left arm, which required a partial amputation of my hand (pinky and ring finger up to the wrist so, half a hand) and a hefty amount of metal on all the breaks. I'm still going through a substantial amount of therapy and maybe have 10% use of my left hand. It hasn't stopped me and my love for 2 wheels. I've been out of a wheelchair for a month and against the advice of every friend, family member, aquaintance, etcetera hopped on 3 weeks ago just to see if I could do it. Just to make sure another passion isn't being taken away. Just to see if I could feel some degree of normalcy again. I got on and rode a block. I cried. I hurt. But I rode another block. And another. And another. I cried more but they were tears of relief. Tears of happiness. Tears of joy. All despite the pain, I was pedaling again. Feeling the wind on my face. My ears. My legs. My soul. And what's left of my hands. That happy hand that has helped me brake, shift, and control those 2 wheels for years. That's gone for the moment but it's not gonna stop me. It makes me want to ride more. It makes me want to ride harder. And it makes me realize how much it means to me and my sanity. *I've, in the past three weeks, rode about fifty miles. That used to be a normal weekday road bike ride and now it's taken 3 weeks. But I still rode them, despite the circumstances. And in all of this I've realized that I don't have a disability. I have a setback where I can't stop or ride as fast. For now. The expectations are bright for a full recovery, sans some digits. I don't know if I have the ability to inspire but I hope that everyone doesn't take those 2 wheels for granted. You never know when life will throw a curveball. I've been fortunate enough to continue to bat.*

Sixty Fiver 10-09-11 04:28 PM

crackerjab... there are no words here.

Except as always... you f'ing rock.


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