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-   Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/)
-   -   How Many Of You Have A Disability? (http://www.bikeforums.net/adaptive-cycling-handcycles-amputee-adaptation-visual-impairment-other-needs/194939-how-many-you-have-disability.html)

green427 10-09-11 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crackerjab (Post 13340632)
All despite the pain, I was pedaling again. Feeling the wind on my face. My ears. My legs. My soul. And what's left of my hands. That happy hand that has helped me brake, shift, and control those 2 wheels for years. That's gone for the moment but it's not gonna stop me. It makes me want to ride more. It makes me want to ride harder. And it makes me realize how much it means to me and my sanity. ...................... The expectations are bright for a full recovery, sans some digits. I don't know if I have the ability to inspire but I hope that everyone doesn't take those 2 wheels for granted. You never know when life will throw a curveball. I've been fortunate enough to continue to bat.*

Well said, and keep up with the positive attitude. Sorry about the accident, though.
:thumb::thumb:

Most people would sit and mope for a long time, but you are one of the rare ones that don't do that.

HAMMER MAN 10-09-11 06:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13301809)
Ok, I hesitated to sign up here since my disability was heavily debated on other subforums, and many people have some very strong views.

I am legally deaf, and I mean 100% deaf in both ears when I am not wearing my cochlear implants. Have been that way since I was little. I've been riding bicycles since I was little, and logged thousands of miles up until I was 16 years old.

I ride with a group of deaf men & women when I have the chance. Bicycling was one way I could escape the wrath of hearing bullies I've encountered in my youth, and today I still ride. Most of us leave our hearing aids off while riding, and in spite of many people thinking we are insane for doing so, we all survived for the last 40+ years.

I understand where you are coming from..though I wasn't born deaf, my hearing loss was from serving in the USMC I am now basically pretty much deaf. I have a profound severe hearing loss in both ears and even though i do wear hearng aids in most cases it doesn't help. when it comes to rding i don't worry a lot about what can or could happen by not being able to hear. i just enjoy my rides, the solitude, and tranquility. Some days are jsut tempo rides, easy spinning other days I hammer.. i also received a leg injury @ the same time and i have foot drop and do not have a knee reflex, pretty much of a bad limp and slap the foot..lol.. I don't know if you ever get use to the snickers and people laughing when you misunderstand,however i just take it in stride
unfortuantely hearing loss, deafness is a silent disability so to speak. so many don't understand it, nor do they take the time to want to converse or carry out a conversation.. i use to be pretty much extroverted as it has worsen to the point it is now i have become more intorverted. life is good though and i try not to let others ignorance bother me. I look @ everyday as a blessing and just keep going forward

Rona 10-10-11 02:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crackerjab (Post 13340632)
I've been out of a wheelchair for a month and against the advice of every friend, family member, aquaintance, etcetera hopped on 3 weeks ago just to see if I could do it.

I think you are in inspiration for how quickly you got back on a bike. It took me 15 years to get back to biking after my injuries. Going back so quickly will help you heal in so many ways! GOOD JOB!

2manybikes 10-10-11 08:13 AM

Just sayin.

Yesterday I got passed by a guy on a nice road bike with no legs below the knee. Two artificial lower legs and feet. His legs and feet were half carbon fiber. He went 18mph for a while. It looked like he had bike shoes and was clipped in. I was impressed.

green427 10-10-11 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HAMMER MAN (Post 13341188)
I have a profound severe hearing loss in both ears and even though i do wear hearng aids in most cases it doesn't help. when it comes to rding i don't worry a lot about what can or could happen by not being able to hear. i just enjoy my rides, the solitude, and tranquility. Some days are jsut tempo rides, easy spinning other days I hammer.. i also received a leg injury @ the same time and i have foot drop and do not have a knee reflex, pretty much of a bad limp and slap the foot..lol..

That pretty much sums up my feelings while riding. It is not an issue until I ride with normal hearing people, some of them feel awkward and are not sure how to communicate with me. During those group rides, I just stay in the background while everyone is chatting away.

Quote:

I don't know if you ever get use to the snickers and people laughing when you misunderstand,however i just take it in stride
unfortuantely hearing loss, deafness is a silent disability so to speak. so many don't understand it, nor do they take the time to want to converse or carry out a conversation.. i use to be pretty much extroverted as it has worsen to the point it is now i have become more intorverted. life is good though and i try not to let others ignorance bother me.
I've put up with the snickers/laughing/mocking for the last 42 years. It is easy to dismiss strangers behaving like that, but it is infuriating when employers, co-workers, and family members do it. I had the implants put in in order to improve my hearing....all because I am doing everything I can to hear as much as I can.

Deafness is not such a big deal until you need employment. The world looks at deaf people as dysfunctional, unable to do anything. We spend a lot of time proving to everyone that we can do the same things, and it is draining. Even the director of the local bicycling club expressed grave concern about me joining. You don't need to hear in order to ride a bicycle.

Chris516 10-13-11 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13346083)
Deafness is not such a big deal until you need employment.

While my hearing is fine in both ears, my congenital health problems ultimately resulted in my being fired from my first full time job. Because they said I was too slow when it came to my typing speed.

The guy in the company that hired me, ended up getting fired for embezzlement.

Go figure

Chris516 10-13-11 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_C (Post 13325607)
Chris516 - yup, I would think you do.

I would wager that most of us, while knowing there are always people worse off then ourselves, wish at one point or another that our *issues* were different.

Not meaning to come across tacky, or the like, I tend to think someone missing most of a leg wishes (at times) that they were more like me, and vice-versa. Never having lost a limb (or it's use completely) I can only guess what someone that has goes through - but at times, I sometimes think it is worse to have *some* use of a limb. My knees almost 'taunt' me. At various points in time, they will almost work well, and then the weather will change, or God will sneeze, and boom, the pain goes crazy high, and they refuse to work - whereas if I didn't have them (my thinking goes), in time I would get used to the way my life is - because at least the issue is somewhat stable, but as they are, every day is different.

This post is *not* meant as whiny, just trying to put a 'voice' to what bounces around in my head at times. As I get older, my ability to deal with constant pain is getting worse, and frankly I can not see dealing with it for another 30-odd years.

I don't think of your response as 'whiny' or tacky.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_C (Post 13325607)
I wonder, if someone loses say, a leg above the knee, after 20-30 years, do they become if not pain-free, do they come close to it, or *stable*, or is "phantom pain" pretty much a for sure thing that never goes away? I assume 'phantom pain' is bout as bad as most other chronic pains?

My collapsed arches have been bad all my life. It wasn't until a couple years ago, that I started wearing arch supports in my shoes, on a regular basis. The last time I had arch supports done for feet, they ended up cutting into the backs' of my feet. So I refused to wear those particular arch supports anymore.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_C (Post 13325607)
I know for sure that chronic back pain must be horrible! With the leg (example) many times you can sorta mentally cut it off and remove it from the rest of you - in other words, turning my head doesn't make my knee or hip hurt more, but with spinal issues, most any movement creates pain...

That has been my curiosity, in regards to my hydrocephalus, if it has for lack of a better word 'stopped', being an active problem. Almost like I am cured, sort of.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Peter_C (Post 13325607)
Living with my mother in-law who has been legally-blind for some 20 odd years, has created a awareness of what a lack of vision can mean, and how much people (as a group) take it for granted.

If I tried to get a drivers' license(which I choose not to do, since I have my bike), I would be considered legally blind by the DMV.

Neil_B 10-14-11 09:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13346083)
I've put up with the snickers/laughing/mocking for the last 42 years.

Same here, but for different reasons.

FunkyStickman 10-14-11 08:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crackerjab (Post 13340632)
I saw this sub forum and wanted to share. Anyway... I was in a catastrophic accident on July 12th, 2011. Amongst other injuries, the ones that affected my cycling were a broken tibia in my right leg (3 breaks, all compound) and I broke every bone from my forearm to my fingertips in my left arm, which required a partial amputation of my hand (pinky and ring finger up to the wrist so, half a hand) and a hefty amount of metal on all the breaks. I'm still going through a substantial amount of therapy and maybe have 10% use of my left hand. It hasn't stopped me and my love for 2 wheels. I've been out of a wheelchair for a month and against the advice of every friend, family member, aquaintance, etcetera hopped on 3 weeks ago just to see if I could do it. Just to make sure another passion isn't being taken away. Just to see if I could feel some degree of normalcy again. I got on and rode a block. I cried. I hurt. But I rode another block. And another. And another. I cried more but they were tears of relief. Tears of happiness. Tears of joy. All despite the pain, I was pedaling again. Feeling the wind on my face. My ears. My legs. My soul. And what's left of my hands. That happy hand that has helped me brake, shift, and control those 2 wheels for years. That's gone for the moment but it's not gonna stop me. It makes me want to ride more. It makes me want to ride harder. And it makes me realize how much it means to me and my sanity. *I've, in the past three weeks, rode about fifty miles. That used to be a normal weekday road bike ride and now it's taken 3 weeks. But I still rode them, despite the circumstances. And in all of this I've realized that I don't have a disability. I have a setback where I can't stop or ride as fast. For now. The expectations are bright for a full recovery, sans some digits. I don't know if I have the ability to inspire but I hope that everyone doesn't take those 2 wheels for granted. You never know when life will throw a curveball. I've been fortunate enough to continue to bat.*

Amazing. Your accident happened on the exact same day mine did... July 12th... and I was/am in much the same boat as you, except I only had my left leg reconstructed. I started riding on a trainer, and when I first got on, I couldn't even bend my knee enough to do a complete rotation of the pedals. I just sat there and moved my legs backwards and forwards a little every day until I could get it all the way around. Three months later, and I can now walk and climb stairs without crutches, I can ride the trainer for more than an hour, but I still haven't ridden the bike on the street. Part of my hesitation is that I promised my wife and kids I would wait until I was cleared for physical activity by the doctor, hopefully in early December. I don't know if I will ever get 100% of my leg strength back, but I'm getting better every day. I'm sure you will do the same! It's just a matter of time, healing, and keeping at it.

My wife looked at me today and said "There's no way you're going to make it to December without riding, is there?" She's a smart woman...

Sgt Mac 10-14-11 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FunkyStickman (Post 13366926)
Amazing. Your accident happened on the exact same day mine did... July 12th... and I was/am in much the same boat as you, except I only had my left leg reconstructed. I started riding on a trainer, and when I first got on, I couldn't even bend my knee enough to do a complete rotation of the pedals. I just sat there and moved my legs backwards and forwards a little every day until I could get it all the way around. Three months later, and I can now walk and climb stairs without crutches, I can ride the trainer for more than an hour, but I still haven't ridden the bike on the street. Part of my hesitation is that I promised my wife and kids I would wait until I was cleared for physical activity by the doctor, hopefully in early December. I don't know if I will ever get 100% of my leg strength back, but I'm getting better every day. I'm sure you will do the same! It's just a matter of time, healing, and keeping at it.

My wife looked at me today and said "There's no way you're going to make it to December without riding, is there?" She's a smart woman...

When I sustained my injuries I was in traction and had a halo screwed into my head, basically flat on my back for six months. My question is did you guys have to go on the table where they slowly raise your head until just before you pass out, & each day they raise you a little more until your almost in a standing position. I hated that almost as much as the surgeries, I never knew that your heart could atrophy so much in six months.

FunkyStickman 10-14-11 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13367015)
When I sustained my injuries I was in traction and had a halo screwed into my head, basically flat on my back for six months. My question is did you guys have to go on the table where they slowly raise your head until just before you pass out, & each day they raise you a little more until your almost in a standing position. I hated that almost as much as the surgeries, I never knew that your heart could atrophy so much in six months.

No, can't say I had it that bad, but it took about 2 weeks before I could stand up without passing out. I was able to push myself up on a walker, but as soon as I took a step, I would black out and the nurses had to catch me. They wouldn't let me leave the hospital until I could move under my own power. It was extremely frustrating. It can be very discouraging when in a few short weeks and months, you can lose years of hard work and fitness. I wouldn't have thought that I would be walking freely by now, but I can, with some effort.

I am constantly amazed by the human body's ability to heal.

Sgt Mac 10-14-11 09:43 PM

Kma

Chris516 10-15-11 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13367015)
When I sustained my injuries I was in traction and had a halo screwed into my head, basically flat on my back for six months. My question is did you guys have to go on the table where they slowly raise your head until just before you pass out, & each day they raise you a little more until your almost in a standing position. I hated that almost as much as the surgeries, I never knew that your heart could atrophy so much in six months.

All my surgeries were related to a congenital issue, not some type of unfortunate accident. So I don't think I have ever had a halo.

BionicChris 10-15-11 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FunkyStickman (Post 13367090)
It was extremely frustrating. It can be very discouraging when in a few short weeks and months, you can lose years of hard work and fitness.

I know this feeling, I used to bike 80km a week without fail, was 12 stone and all muscle, football 3x a week, tennis 2x a week... I am miles from that - every time that I start to get some kind of fitness back I have a problem.

Spend a couple of weeks not doing something and then bang, you're wrecked for months. I am still trying to recover from my hip replacement in June.

Sgt Mac 10-15-11 01:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris516 (Post 13368544)
All my surgeries were related to a congenital issue, not some type accident. So I don't think I have ever had a halo.

Let me tell ya, your'e not missing anything, it is a circular piece of either aluminum or stainless steal and they actually have screws all the way around it that are tightened enough into your skull to mobilize your head & neck, your field of vision is very limited . It gets extremely frustrating staring at the ceiling all freakin day and not being able to see wtf is going on around or to you. Sounds funny but if you never get a halo you are truly blessed. Sorry about your issues just keep up the fight, I do every day all day & night, I can't sleep from the pain or flashbacks, it's been so long now it's the new normal I just came to terms with it this year & I'm 50ish.

Chris516 10-15-11 02:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by green427 (Post 13346083)
I've put up with the snickers/laughing/mocking for the last 42 years. It is easy to dismiss strangers behaving like that, but it is infuriating when employers, co-workers, and family members do it. I had the implants put in in order to improve my hearing....all because I am doing everything I can to hear as much as I can.

I put up with the laughing n' snickering all through school. Now, Unless all those that ever teased me in school, got on a bike and have gone as far as I have, I am the one that can laugh n' snicker now. I remember one specifically that was picking on me with a bunch of other kids in 8th Grade gym class. This particular kid was bigger than me, but not older. That particular day, he was definitely a 'tub of lard'. Thirty years later, he may still be a 'tub of lard', while I can ride a bike with ease.

Chris516 10-15-11 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13368833)
Let me tell ya, your'e not missing anything, it is a circular piece of either aluminum or stainless steal and they actually have screws all the way around it that are tightened enough into your skull to mobilize your head & neck, your field of vision is very limited . It gets extremely frustrating staring at the ceiling all freakin day and not being able to see wtf is going on around or to you. Sounds funny but if you never get a halo you are truly blessed. Sorry about your issues just keep up the fight, I do every day all day & night, I can't sleep from the pain or flashbacks, it's been so long now it's the new normal I just came to terms with it this year & I'm 50ish.

I know what a halo looks like.:eek: I saw plenty of kids on the pediatric neurosurgical ward with halos'.:( I felt(and still do feel) guilty that I have a congenital neurological problem, yet I have never needed a halo.:(

Tom Stormcrowe 10-15-11 03:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris516 (Post 13368544)
All my surgeries were related to a congenital issue, not some type accident. So I don't think I have ever had a halo.

Trust me, if had ever had a halo, you'd remember it vividly. It's essentiallly a device to immobilize and apply traction to the neck to prevent spinal cord injury.

Sgt Mac 10-15-11 09:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13369149)
Trust me, if had ever had a halo, you'd remember it vividly. It's essentiallly a device to immobilize and apply traction to the neck to prevent spinal cord injury.

Yea I forgot about the hole they drilled into my tibia and put a bolt through it with about 80lbs hanging off the end of the bed on a pulley.

Tom Stormcrowe 10-16-11 08:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13370241)
Yea I forgot about the hole they drilled into my tibia and put a bolt through it with about 80lbs hanging off the end of the bed on a pulley.

Yeah, ain't that just a joy as well?

Neil_B 10-16-11 12:14 PM

Folks, where are the ride reports? Where are the stories of our adventures? I can sit and moan with the best of them, but, really, do we want this forum as "all cripples, all the time?" I gave up posting to the National Scoliosis Foundation boards partly because so many people wore pain and disfigurement and victimhood as a badge of honor. Let's not live up to the stereotype able-bodied people give us.

Sgt Mac 10-16-11 12:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neil_B (Post 13372059)
Folks, where are the ride reports? Where are the stories of our adventures? I can sit and moan with the best of them, but, really, do we want this forum as "all cripples, all the time?" I gave up posting to the National Scoliosis Foundation boards partly because so many people wore pain and disfigurement and victimhood as a badge of honor. Let's not live up to the stereotype able-bodied people give us.

OH yea

Neil_B 10-16-11 12:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sgt Mac (Post 13372101)
It's not like that at all brother, I just bought an awesome mtn bike check it out http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-of-my-Xtrance I'm going riding asap, mention of my injuries are in no way a pitty party, simply stating the facts. I do believe it helps people to read what others went through to either say wow mine wasn't that bad or just to know your not alone in your pain. that's why some of us have weekly meetings at the VA, it helps to talk to people that have been through what you have. Look at yourself, like I said after looking at your photos did me some good to know yours is unfortunately genetic so you never got to experience being a literal super man like I was, but I got cut down to size and quite violently. Your still an inspiration to me.

Yes, sharing the facts and ways to work around them are great. But I don't see anything more than that getting posted. Why should the allegedly "able-bodied" people have all the fun?

FunkyStickman 10-16-11 03:13 PM

Trust me, as soon as I can ride again, I will be posting up reports... :)

Chris516 10-16-11 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FunkyStickman (Post 13372588)
Trust me, as soon as I can ride again, I will be posting up reports... :)

While I can ride, I should be posting.


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