Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-15-13, 10:08 PM   #76
Peter_C
I am the Snail~!
 
Peter_C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Near Akron, Ohio
Bikes: 2010 TerraTrike Rover 8
Posts: 1,584
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was going to suggest a 'recumbent trike', but they do tend to be heavier to load...
Peter_C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-13, 02:11 PM   #77
BuddyBike
Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I thought you all might be interested in learning about Recumbent Cycle-Con 2013. I have just been hired as a show coordinator. They are bringing me in to create an adaptive cycling section for the expo. It will be a great place for you to talk in person about the issues you've brought up on this page and you'll be able to try the equipment as the bike vendors will all be outside next to the trial track. There will also be a dedicated track for adaptive bikes for those who want to take it slower. So make your plans to attend now! I'll be looking for adaptive and alternative cycling exhibitors and panelists for our 2nd Adaptive Cycling Roundtable. I would like to add some other adaptive cycling presentations as well and I'm open to suggestions in that area. I need help spreading the word. This will be an excellent venue for families to come out to try various alternative bicycles. I'm also seeking a variety of other exhibitors to add interest to the event. Anything related to bikes and adaptive cycling, therapeutic programs and activities, artwork, clothing, bike accessories, green and healthy products and more! Please let me know if you would like to see an exhibitor packet or if you have any suggestions for presenters and exhibitors. I'll post more information as it becomes available! I'll have a new e-mail and toll free phone number soon but for now, contact me at shelley@buddybike.com 786.489.2453 http://recumbentcyclecon.blogspot.com/
BuddyBike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-13, 09:16 AM   #78
ralph12
Kamek
 
ralph12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, I'm Ralph. I used to post here years ago.

I got hit by a car some years back. After the initial impacts plus some ill-advised surgical procedures that caused a lot of permanent sequelae, I'm here with a lot of broken nerves, damaged tissues, and many weak spots in my left leg. I have constant knee pain and can't feel most of my foot, so keeping my foot on a regular platform pedal has become pretty difficult (it falls off). I'll probably make the switch to clipless soon.

I haven't cycled in a long time, mostly due to this injury, but I plan on getting back into it.
ralph12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-13, 03:29 AM   #79
ACyclingRooster
Junior Member
 
ACyclingRooster's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Scarisbrick,Lancashire,England.
Bikes: 50 cm Bianchi Via Nirone 7 Alu Carbon + a Fully restored 52cm Italian build Benotto Modelo 850.
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralph12 View Post
Hi, I'm Ralph. I used to post here years ago.

I got hit by a car some years back. After the initial impacts plus some ill-advised surgical procedures that caused a lot of permanent sequelae, I'm here with a lot of broken nerves, damaged tissues, and many weak spots in my left leg. I have constant knee pain and can't feel most of my foot, so keeping my foot on a regular platform pedal has become pretty difficult (it falls off). I'll probably make the switch to clipless soon.

I haven't cycled in a long time, mostly due to this injury, but I plan on getting back into it.

Hi Ralph. I know exactly where you are coming from,I myself have been in very similar situations in the past.
Might I suggest to you that you do not go clip-less but seek-out and use the older style pedals and toe-clips with straps. These can be used with a smooth plain sole or can have a grooved shoe-plate fastened on so as to engage with the pedal.
I ride Marcel Berthet Lyotard Platform Pedals with Christophe Toe-clips and Leather Straps these are coupled with Traditional Vittoria Leather Cycling Shoes with Aluminium sole plates.
The older style of securing your feet will if necessary permit easy withdrawal of your feet and especially if your have impaired feel in one or more of your feet.
The clip-less can be difficult to engage and even more difficult to release from unless very fine tuning of the mechanisms is carried out

.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 280920121143.jpg (101.5 KB, 13 views)
ACyclingRooster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-13, 10:09 AM   #80
dadse
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: northeast ohio & central florida
Bikes:
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
hello, I'm bob - age 67. I've been a touring cyclist for more than forty-five years - but stopped when (pretty much all at once) my vision deteriorated (diabetic retinopathy), I had a heart attack, I entered end-stage kidney disease (now in dialysis), and suffered nerve/muscle damage from cancer surgery. despite these life factors I am still walking (well, anyway I'm ambulatory) and talking - and wish to resume cycling. I don't envision any more 'centuries', and I imagine the joys of weeks-long cycle-touring are lost to me (at least, outside the US) but I've hit on the idea of a folding (e.g., step-through) 'commuter bike and plan to start up again with short, low-geared, 'spins' around the block (maybe up to circle-the-community rides) we'll see how it goes. I've read posts on these forums concerning 'building up' (esp. for older riders). I am leery of 'mashing' with heart issues. but 'spinning' seems doable for me. I never went very fast - I'd climb in a granny gear and move only fast enough to remain upright to the top; a century would take me all day (with sightseeing and leisurely meal stops). I don't know how much to expect of myself now, but I'm looking forward to the ride.
dadse is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-08-13, 11:40 AM   #81
ralph12
Kamek
 
ralph12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ACyclingRooster View Post
Hi Ralph. I know exactly where you are coming from,I myself have been in very similar situations in the past.
Might I suggest to you that you do not go clip-less but seek-out and use the older style pedals and toe-clips with straps. These can be used with a smooth plain sole or can have a grooved shoe-plate fastened on so as to engage with the pedal.
I ride Marcel Berthet Lyotard Platform Pedals with Christophe Toe-clips and Leather Straps these are coupled with Traditional Vittoria Leather Cycling Shoes with Aluminium sole plates.
The older style of securing your feet will if necessary permit easy withdrawal of your feet and especially if your have impaired feel in one or more of your feet.
The clip-less can be difficult to engage and even more difficult to release from unless very fine tuning of the mechanisms is carried out

.
Most people aren't cyclists, and most people don't have peripheral neuropathy; hence it's really hard to find decent advice for someone with both. So, thank you very much for the recommendation.

I used to use toe clips and straps when I was about 18 and had just gotten into cycling a year or so earlier, and I liked them. I found they go pretty nicely with a pair of Converse All-Stars. I'll give them a go again.
ralph12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-06-13, 06:31 AM   #82
squalle
Shop Owner
 
squalle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Haddonfield, NJ
Bikes: BMX, Road, Moutain, Fixie, Custom
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi I am Pasquale and I own a small shop in New Jersey. I am still getting acclimated with the forums so please forgive me if I am not good at posting photos. I recently put a post up on a classic bicycle I brought into the shop but I know nothing about it. I am looking for some direction on what it can be.

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...3#post15469513

In the link above is what I posted but I didn't get any views. Can anyone help me?

Happy Riding everyone
squalle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-13, 01:08 PM   #83
Shiloh253
Senior Member
 
Shiloh253's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Laramie, WY
Bikes: 2015 Motobecane Mirage S
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hey everyone! I'm John, 19 years old from northwest WA state (I put the "state" bit because people think I'm a sleazy politician otherwise, haha). I've been legally blind in my right eye since birth, about 20/400 or 500. The left eye is okay, about 20/50 or 20/40 on a good day, and I've had four surgeries on the right eye: First to fix a detached retina, second to remove scar tissue from the first op, a third to take out the silicone gel they used to hold everything in place inside the eye, and the fourth was to fix a cataract that occurred as a result of the other three surgeries. Funny how that works out.

I've got permission from both my doc and the DMV to get a license, but being a college student the money isn't exactly there to get a car anyway, so I figured why bother? I've got an old Trek 3900 that I bought some time ago and just pulled off the rack for the first time a few months ago. Got a local shop to tune it up a little, get the gears set right and such. I'm mostly a commuter, but I'm starting to get into some trail riding as well.

Can't wait to get to know some of you folks!
Shiloh253 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-13, 09:44 AM   #84
jods
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Hi Everyone
I'm Jody Cundy, from Great Britain. Below Knee Amputee RHS. 5 time Paralympic Gold medalist in swimming and cycling, current World Champion and World record holder in the 1km TT (1:05.029) and Flying 200m (10.803)
I also ride on a pretty cool looking custom cycling prosthesis, made by Ossur.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 12_08_15_Leg_Unveiling_003.jpg (38.4 KB, 26 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_1553.jpg (94.6 KB, 29 views)
jods is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-13, 06:38 AM   #85
punkncat
LBKA
 
punkncat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: OTP South
Bikes: Spec Roubaix SL4, DawesSST
Posts: 2,580
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jods View Post
Hi Everyone
I'm Jody Cundy, from Great Britain. Below Knee Amputee RHS. 5 time Paralympic Gold medalist in swimming and cycling, current World Champion and World record holder in the 1km TT (1:05.029) and Flying 200m (10.803)
I also ride on a pretty cool looking custom cycling prosthesis, made by Ossur.
I have always been curious about these "custom" devices I see athletes like yourself using. Was this something you paid for yourself, or did you score some manner of "sponsorship" and gifted the device?
To further the question, how do you go about finding a specialist within the prosthetic field outside of Olympic training?

My current prothesist, actually the entire company will work with me to modify or adjust my device to be more cycling friendly but asking about having a specific device made resulted in another "walking" leg to be modified. I was passed along some information to some Olympic coaches and trainers who work with athletes like yourself as a specialty, but obviously if you aren't involved in the Olympics they don't have time or pass advice.

Sorry for the long post, I would love to take it to PM with you if you are so inclined after you get your post count up.
Thx
punkncat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-13, 04:05 PM   #86
jods
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I'm actually one of the Team Ossur athletes, so it's a sponsorship deal. They look after my day to day legs and my racing leg.
I was lucky as I put in a request on their website for help and they replied with a yes! I think the fact that I was already world champion, and getting ready to go to Beijing helped!
My prothesist has a major interest in sport, and understanding what the athlete wants, so we work well together to get the fit and alignment we need. To be fair the custom leg is the same socket I use on my day leg, but we replaced the foot and attachments with a simple carbon blade, with no foot etc as I didn't need them, especially when racing. But the alignment is based off my walking leg with a cycling shoe on.
The most important thing for me is fit, no pistoning, rubbing or pressure points, and that it will stay on during a forceful start. And the alignment, so that I can get maximal power transferred to the pedals of the bike. once you've got that not a lot else in it! And if anyone tells you that you need a fancy all singing all dancing leg to ride a bike they're talking rubbish. I won my first world title on a bog standard, ill fitting leg that had seen better days and was modified with a dremel tool to stop rubbing while riding. In fact i still use it on the road to train with to this day
jods is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-13, 04:02 AM   #87
Carlamast
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm Jeff, I recently was injured while commuting to work, and had to have my left leg reconstructed. I'm now in physical rehab, but it will be around a year before I will be able to easily ride a 2-wheeled bike again. I'm very interested in adaptive bikes, as I'm a tinkerer and inventor at heart. I will definitely be learning everything I can about the subject. Welcome!







[TABLE="width: 547"]
[TR]
[TD="class: xl72, width: 547"]Motocross Gear For Kids[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
Carlamast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-13, 10:28 AM   #88
echale3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Roanoke, VA
Bikes: Gary Fisher Mamba (circa 1995 or so), 2012 KHS CX300
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Some of y'all in here are dealing with a lot more than I am, my hat's off to you! My philosophy is that every day on this side of the dirt is a good one and complaining gets you nowhere fast...

I don't consider myself as being in any way disabled or handicapped, or whatever you would care to call it but I do have double-major scoliotic curves (42 degrees lumbar, 55 thoracic) that have been stabilized with old-school Harrington rods, complete with spinal fusion (a total of 14 vertebra fused, T1 through L2), using bone taken from my iliac crest. The surgery was done 32 years ago, and I now have arthritic lipping in the lumbar veterbrae that can still move.

The top 4" or so of one of the rods sheared off during a wreck (it's been known to happen due to a flaw in the design of the rods), and now I have limited range of motion in my neck, plus my arms tend to go to sleep if they stay in the same position for too long.

I do yoga to enhance what range of motion I have left and to control chronic back/leg pain, I lift weights, do pilates for more core work over and above what I get from the yoga and weight training, and I teach a high-intensity cycle class locally.

I've ridden an old mountain bike for years (on the road, I hike with my wife and dogs in the woods). I'm looking at getting a road bike for commuting and taking my mountain bike back to our place on my wife's family's farm, which is about 5 minutes from the New River Trail, so so she and I can ride the trail (she won't ride her bike in the city).

The endurance-fit bikes and cyclocross bikes seem to fit me me pretty well, position-wise--I can't do the race position for very long as the extra few degrees forward lean becomes painful rather quickly. I'm looking for something with a road frame, skinny tires, and a fairly relaxed ride position--something where the handlebars would be on a level with or maybe just slightly below the seat height, but not as upright as a mountain bike. Does anybody have any input as to a road bike that'd be something to consider?
echale3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-13, 07:44 AM   #89
yodatic
Senior Member
 
yodatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: N/W Florida--Pace
Bikes: N+1=20013 Green mongoose Beast, '74 Raleigh International, '58 Raleigh Dawn Tourist, Univega Alpine Sport, Univega Ladies MTB- Wife's, Townie 7D -Wife's, and a pile-o-spare British 'junque'
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
<<<<< computer semi-literate

[QUOTE][/QUOTE] Hello, Tom here. I don't know if I belong in here or not, but I am inspired and encouraged by the positive attitudes and optimism . I had to wake my Wife of 29 years Oct. 5 2013 , drooling and unable to form words, right hand flopping around, weird, huh ? We thought it was just a stroke, the hospital checked for that and decided I had leigons ? in my brain They had no neurologist on staff on weekends so I got to take the first ambulance ride of my life from Milton to Sacred Heart Hospital at 56 years old They did some more CT Scans, some MRI,s , and a brain biopsy ad now I know I have a "GiloblastomaMultiform Stage IV" ( I think they use roman numerals when they think it,s something cool ) They said I could call it an inoperable brain tumor if it's easier to remember. The upshot of all that is that although , other than the brain thing, I can't drink alcohol, and my wife has us on a much healthier diet, more natural foods, no refined sugars, white rice , etc. My energy level and concentration are way up! I know I have been given a gift, a Heavenly wake up call if you will! ( but I'm still not sure if I'm disabled )

Last edited by yodatic; 12-02-13 at 09:44 PM.
yodatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-14, 07:15 AM   #90
riadahmed3624
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi i am riad and i am a student. My hobby is bike riding.
riadahmed3624 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-14, 12:11 PM   #91
gaisom
Newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Grant here. I am legally blind (10% of left eye ramaining) according to the social security folks, and a Disabled veteran to boot!

I ride a Sun USX HD20 Recumbent trike with electric assist. Living in WA state I do lots of riding in raingear and have had to waterproof everything electrical BTW, if you are riding a heavy machine downhill in the rain using rim brakes better get ready to drag your feet!

Both of my knees are bone to bone with multiple surgeries and strangely enough I can ride the recumbent with virtually NO knee pain!

Last edited by gaisom; 04-22-14 at 12:43 PM. Reason: Forgot to put something in
gaisom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-14, 01:05 PM   #92
scolist
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Poughkeepsie, New York
Bikes:
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi! I'm Scott and I'm a L BKA as the result of a work accident. I'm in the market for a hybrid type bike as I don't see me doing any hardcore riding. I look forward to reading this entire Adaptive Cycling forum to learn about everyone's different scenarios.

Scott
scolist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-14, 01:34 PM   #93
rberriz
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Fairfax, VA
Bikes: 2015 S-Works Tarmac Disc
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Background
I was shot back in college, 2008, and took heavy damage to my brachial plexus, as well as severing my coratid and subclavian artery. This left my whole left arm without movement until surgery 2 years later. I had several procedures at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota where they reconfigured the musculature of the left arm. My biceps control finger flexion, triceps control thumb opposition. A miracle I survived, I know, but I pretty much sat sedentary for the next several years. I got up to my heaviest point on around Jan 1st 2014 and have since lost about 50 lbs and signed up for a century (the seagull century). I started riding my bike (cheap road bike from amazon) everyday to and from work and riding every evening as well. I am currently planning on buying a new bike (2015 Specialized S-Works Tarmac Disc) as a reward for the weight loss.
rberriz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-15, 10:51 AM   #94
BluGnat
Junior Member
 
BluGnat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Denver-ish, Colorado
Bikes: MTB, Hybrid, Bianchi Infinito (Celeste, of course)
Posts: 16
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not disabled, but keeping an eye on this section for a couple friends; one lives with Charcot-Marie-Tooth and loves riding adaptive cycles (but doesn't own one due to cost prohibitions) and her horses (and ATV used for chores). Another friend has MS, and while he's recently purchased a GT road bike and plans to ride with us in the '16 Bike MS (Colorado) ride, I'd love to keep an eye out for possible tips/ideas for him, as well.

Just reading the intros has been very uplifting and heartwarming. You all are amazing people! Thought it would be wise to post a little intro, due to my planned lurking/research. Thank you!
BluGnat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-21-15, 01:07 PM   #95
BikingMountains
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Boston
Bikes: Vintage and new Bianchis
Posts: 21
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi! I'm from Boston and bought a Freedom Ryder handcycle when I had a serious knee injury. My knee is better now, but I love the bike and still ride it!
BikingMountains is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-15, 04:30 PM   #96
NerdLord
Member
 
NerdLord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Northern California
Bikes: 2008-Fuji Absolute 4.0
Posts: 29
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi,
name's jerry, I have two problems areas actually, 1. neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet from a close encounter with a drunk driver and 2. mangled knee (tibial plateu fracture) that left my Rt foot about 4-5 inches angled outboard from the 'normal' position.

I ride a 2010 FUJI absolute 4.0 I picked up (in 2010) just months before the accident and it's been in storage until now. I hope to not only do more riding but prep and try my hand at touring with it.

Mods made include a spacer on one side and larger footbed Mountainbike pedals. new racks (rear and fork) and new LED lighting.

Last edited by NerdLord; 10-06-15 at 04:33 PM.
NerdLord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-15, 03:38 PM   #97
McStumpy
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, I'm Alan

I was born without a left hand and wear an electric prosthetic for life and cycling.

I ride a Triban 540 flat bar. Mods - Decathlon fitted a bmx style barrel splitter so the right brake lever pulls both brakes. The front shifter is on a crowded right hand side of the bar, on the top side, so all controls in reach of right hand.

I'm interested in converting bike to drop bar so will be searching the forum for ideas.
McStumpy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-15, 07:07 PM   #98
TerryinPa
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Bikes:
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello all. My name is Terry and I live in Pa. I am a member of the physically challenged. I lost my right arm at the shoulder and have significant impairments in my remaining left arm, wrist, hand and fingers due to an electrical accident back in '89. I also had my left knee replaced about 8 years ago as well as have recurring problems with bulging discs in my lower back. It is for these reasons that I'm glad I found this forum. I previously rode a 3 speed bike with coaster brakes but now I moved to a hillier locale and am in the process of getting a 7 speed with modifications. I am fortunate to have a bike shop 45 min. away with a great staff who are helping with mods to get me to be able to use a 7 speed bike by modifying the shifter, handlebars and brake lever and controls.
TerryinPa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-15, 11:12 PM   #99
Indyspeeddmon
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Indiana
Bikes: Specialized Allez
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello everyone, just wanted to drop in and say thank you. While I personally don't have a need for any adaptations I have found some wonderful suggestions in this forum that have helped my wife. After a motorcycle accident, with head trauma, my wife suffered a stroke while in a induced coma. After many years of little activity she has decided to try and get exercise however she can. While she does walk some complications from the stroke make it painful for her to do this for longer than a mile or so, although she has pushed it and walked a couple of 5ks. I recently purchased her a trike and she has fallen in love with it. It is a sense of freedom for her and it makes me smile to see her enjoying being out again. She is way too young (35) to be cooped up. Again, thank you and I look forward to reading and learning more.
Indyspeeddmon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-15, 07:33 PM   #100
FootBikes
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: SF Bay
Bikes: Various footbikes, hybrid and electric.
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi. I'm Doug.

I'm coming back to BF after being away because I've found a way to "cycle" again when I thought I was finished for good. But I have a problem.

This will probably be a long introduction, but it seems like the best way to introduce myself and my situation.

A series of medical problems -- couple of heart attacks, prostate issues, knee and hip problems (and couple others, but those are the main ones) just made it too hard to cycle for quite a while. Electric assistance would help with the stamina issues from the heart problems, but the saddle exacerbates the prostate problems. A recumbent would resolve the problem of making the prostate issue worse, but I've never felt comfortable riding a bent in traffic and, anyway, high-quality electric recumbents are big-time expensive.

With the recent craze over scooters of various kinds (kick and electric) and the weird (IMHO) infatuation with "Hoverboards" (that don't really hover at all), I was motivated to cruise the Web looking for things I might try that are more like real bikes. I ended up discovering "kickbikes" or "footbikes" which have apparently been popular in Europe for some time (one history I read says that the original was made in Finland in the early 90s). Footbikes have begun to make their way to North America and a few manufacturers have begun adding electric assistance. Looked like a great idea, so I bought a mid-priced one (they run from cheap and worth it to pretty darn expensive).

My first ride on the new electric footbike was great. It was easy to ride, moved plenty fast enough for my old self, standing gave me a bit of exercise and a great position to see and be seen. And, when I felt up to it, I could easily step off and walk with it for a little more exercise (and even use it a bit like a cane, for support).

The second ride was a different story. As I rode slowly, over a very shallow, low, gentle embankment at the edge of a plate covering some road work, a tube projecting below the frame of the footbike dug into the smooth asphalt, brought the device to a sudden stop, lifting the rear wheel a bit and tossing me off to the side (I was able to sort of step off and didn't fall all the way, since I was traveling so slowly). One of my knees collapsed (fortunately not the open that already doesn't work) and is still rather sore weeks later, but it wasn't a catastrophe.

When I got home and got the bike up on the bench and measured, I discovered that, because of several projections (tube ends, part of a centerstand) below the frame, the ground clearance is only about 2.5 inches. To me, on a 26" wheel footbike that can do 20 mph under electric power, this is just crazy. The manufacturer, the bike shop guy and the experienced users on the kick scooter forums all seem to think it's perfectly normal and that "lower is better" for these devices. I'm sure that's true when you're in a race on a perfectly smooth surface and powering the bike solely by kicking, or when you're toodling along through the park on your small-wheel scooter with plenty of time to watch for the slightest bump or irregularity, but it makes no sense at all, to me, for powered footbikes that are not going to be kick-powered much of the time (they're too heavy, anyway) and that need to operate on our ordinary rough roads and trails and sometimes surrounded by traffic.

So, now I'm trying to buy one of the few footbikes that seems to be designed for powered operation, one with a lot more ground clearance. I was arguing with the seller and manufacturer of the first one, but they just think that I'm the one who doesn't understand.

Sorry for the long, boring report, but that's my introductory story and I'd love to here from any other riders with disabilities who have any experience with these bike-like creatures.

~Doug
FootBikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:49 PM.