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  1. #1
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    Have a problem need help!

    I suffered the lose of my left lower leg in a shark attack down in Costa Rica some months ago. My problem is I can't seem to complete a crank revolution with out my left heel hitting the crank arm. Would a set of shoes and cleats help to lock in the foot so there is no lateral movement of the heel? If so, any recommendations on shoes(reasonable $$) and how exactly do the cleats work. I want to do some local trail riding in the Pine Barrens of NJ. But because of this situation, I've been only riding on the street. Thanks, Bob

  2. #2
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCaffyn View Post
    I suffered the lose of my left lower leg in a shark attack down in Costa Rica some months ago. My problem is I can't seem to complete a crank revolution with out my left heel hitting the crank arm. Would a set of shoes and cleats help to lock in the foot so there is no lateral movement of the heel? If so, any recommendations on shoes(reasonable $$) and how exactly do the cleats work. I want to do some local trail riding in the Pine Barrens of NJ. But because of this situation, I've been only riding on the street. Thanks, Bob
    Look at this thread to see an example of what you should be looking for:

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...kson-yesterday

    Punkncat should be able to give you advice.....

    You should be able to get shoes and SPD cleats for under a hundred bucks. The cleats connect you to the pedal at the ball of the foot. You disengage them by twisting your foot out at the heel. Keep in mind that part of the learning curve for them usually includes a low speed fall or three when you forget to 'click out' at stop signs, red lights, etc.

    Why is the prosthetic foot hitting the crank arm?

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the insperation. Mine looks much like his. It seems to be a problem of geometry, straight, the leg works fine. Bend the knee and for some reason I end up toe out or heel in. Whatever, as the foot comes up it goes OK, but its on the downstroke that it hits. Is it the pressure I exert on the foot? I dunno. But thought shoes/cleats might be the answer. Think I'm gonna try the Specialized shop up the road and my Trek shop in town and see what they can do. Thanks for the help. Bob

  4. #4
    Neil_B
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCaffyn View Post
    Thanks for the insperation. Mine looks much like his. It seems to be a problem of geometry, straight, the leg works fine. Bend the knee and for some reason I end up toe out or heel in. Whatever, as the foot comes up it goes OK, but its on the downstroke that it hits. Is it the pressure I exert on the foot? I dunno. But thought shoes/cleats might be the answer. Think I'm gonna try the Specialized shop up the road and my Trek shop in town and see what they can do. Thanks for the help. Bob
    You might see if the shop can do a bike fitting for you. Perhaps you need an extender on a pedal? Hard to say without photos.

    BTW, when you get set up, perhaps we can meet for a road ride later this year. I'll have new knees by then and I'll need to test them out.

  5. #5
    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    If you only have one leg for now, you can turn your toe in to avoid the crank.

    First, talk to your prosthesist so he can show you how to properly torque the bolt, and also to make sure that one or another side of your pylon is able to be turned. I took a black sharpie and put two marks at a joint I could easily line up to. One was my normal walking adjustment, and the other was what would miss the crank. I carry the allen wrench I need in my seat bag.

    I found an adjustable length pylon in some extra parts the prosthesist had at his office. It will raise and lower by turning it round, so you can easily set toe in, as well as to make that side longer than the other leg (since you have no ankle flexion). I have found that running my "good" leg at about 35* knee flexion, and the amputated side adjusted long to get me about 40*. My knee is also messed up and pops when I extend it past a certain point.

    I use spd's. eggbeaters to be precise. They are always open to the top and are very easy to clip in and out of. I personally use the 7* float side of the cleat for that foot. The other advantage is the ability to walk on the shoe without actually being on the cleat and thus up on your toe. Without an ankle you cannot correct for that and it makes walking very awkward and unsafe.

    Best of luck to you. If you have any questions don't hesitate to ask.
    Last edited by punkncat; 03-03-12 at 03:05 PM.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member 009jim's Avatar
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    I can't understand this. The OP seems to have said his left leg was taken by a shark, but now his left heel hits the crank? Does he have a left leg or not?

  7. #7
    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    He is meaning that his left 'prosthetic' heel is hitting the crank. Common problem to those who cannot move an ankle they don't have. Re-read his, and then my post just above. It should give you a better picture of the issue.
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  8. #8
    24-Speed Machine Chris516's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCaffyn View Post
    Thanks for the insperation. Mine looks much like his. It seems to be a problem of geometry, straight, the leg works fine. Bend the knee and for some reason I end up toe out or heel in. Whatever, as the foot comes up it goes OK, but its on the downstroke that it hits. Is it the pressure I exert on the foot? I dunno. But thought shoes/cleats might be the answer. Think I'm gonna try the Specialized shop up the road and my Trek shop in town and see what they can do. Thanks for the help. Bob
    I hope you find the answer. To me, it sounds like something is loose in your prosthetic leg.

  9. #9
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    I am AKA and had the same problem. I purchased a pedal extender for 35$. Made all difference in the world! It extends about 1 1/2 in. I know I could adjust the foot angle on prosthetist and achieve same results but found that this was not very convenient because I have a cover over the adjustment screws and lower pylon of my leg. I also use a crank shortner on that side. This helps limit the bend at the knee thus no pinch.

  10. #10
    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    Hey tarwets, I was curious...you mention less flexion in the knee eliminating pinch. Where are you experiencing this as an AKA?
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  11. #11
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    Less bend or flextion of my knee has a direct relation ship to the movement of my prosthesis socket at the hip. I was getting pinched at anterior and posterior points on my hip. Smaller rotation at the crank, smaller movement at knee, less movement pinch of my hip.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tarwets View Post
    I am AKA and had the same problem. I purchased a pedal extender for 35$. Made all difference in the world! It extends about 1 1/2 in.
    I use the same solution. I have a very nonstandard alignment, and inside side of my B/K socket hits bike frame when pedaling. Pedal extenders are the ticket for me. Note that eggbeater pedals do not work with these.

  13. #13
    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    You are early into your sockets as well. As time goes on and you continue to atrophy in the residual area, then your sockets will get smaller and avoiding the bike frame becomes easier. My first bike has a mark on the frame from my early prosthesis' hitting there, but I no longer have that issue. Everyone's residual is different, so go with what works best. It is awesome that you are out riding.
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