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Thread: New riding leg

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    Post New riding leg

    DSCN0089.JPGBrent (3).jpg






    Fresh from the research and development department of Anderson Brace and Limb, Dyersburg TN, a new riding leg!!! 50% less weight, better center of gravity and no loss of energy as in flexible legs. I know this looks weird with no shoe but the results are wonderful. . They mounted the clip that normally attaches to the shoe directly to the bottom of the leg.

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    You gonna eat that? Doohickie's Avatar
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    Sporty.
    I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



    Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."

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    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    I have tried to do the same, but my insurance company deemed it "unnecessary" and won't pay for it. Unless I come out of pocket the $10-15K to have one built I am stuck using old walking legs. It works well enough, but has it's limitations as you well know.
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    Where on the foot did you have the cleat mounted? under the ball of foot, or closer to middle of foot? Is this the same walking alignment as your everyday leg?

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    Semper Fi, A way of life. qcpmsame's Avatar
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    I truly hope the leg works out for you, it looks like it is an advance in this field. Why can't the mfgrs and insurance work together to provide this appliance to those like Punkncat can have them to better their life. No politics wanted here in my reply just a hope, I would gladly work for/with a foundation the raise funds and awareness for these types of appliances, along the lines of the Wounded Warrior group I support now. If anyone knows of one please post in this forum or shoot me a P.M. so we will know.

    Bill
    "I Can Do All Things Through Christ Who Strengthens Me" Philippians 4:13

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    Pic with shoe was first riding leg. Pic with no shoe is new one.Cleat is mounted directly on the bottom of the pylon. We took and old socket and went through their old parts inventory and put it together. Cost was minimal. Riding with my walking leg zapped my strength on long rides and hills. The greatest benefit to my walking foot, it is a miniature cleg from ankle down, is that the foot loads itself with pressure. It then springs off when I am on the toe in the waking stride. No mechanics involved, just spring action so there is a return energy effect, similar to Oscar's running legs. Problem on a bike is that the foot is loaded on the downward stroke, which takes extra energy, but the spring action does not help in the return upward pull on the pedal. All loaded energy is lost at the bottom of the stroke. Trying to pull up with my surgical leg also caused crams in my calf muscle as the tendons and muscles are no longer connected to anything to keep the stretched out and taught. Hope this explains more.

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    One legged rider
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    Nice peg leg. What cleat and pedal system are you using? I fabricated one myself a few years ago and Speedplay Frogs were the only thing I could find that I wouldnt either pull out of or be totally stuck into unable to unclip.

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    Cleats

    Quote Originally Posted by benajah View Post
    Nice peg leg. What cleat and pedal system are you using? I fabricated one myself a few years ago and Speedplay Frogs were the only thing I could find that I wouldnt either pull out of or be totally stuck into unable to unclip.
    I use spd mountain bike cleats as they are much easier to walk on. I also use riding shoes that look like road biking shoes on top but have mountain bike soles on them, got them from Nashbar and are their brand. I adjusted my pedals so that they are very hard to clip out of, most of the time I grab the top of my prosthesis and twist with one hand. Just finished a 300 mile fundraising ride last week and it only unclipped once. Hope you are doing well, you have been a great encouragement to me over the past 2 years since my amputation.

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    Nice thread. I am 10 mos into cycling with a prosthetic. I tried the multi release spd pedals yesterday and I will do a longer ride today. I think it is going to work. Thanks for the help, benajah and others!
    Below knee amputee, left
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    One legged rider
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    Thanks man, I'm doing good.
    i used SPD multi release for years with a cycling shoe on a regular leg. With my peg leg I find that I have a hard time clipping in and that, without the flex leeway I get from having a foot, then a shoe, I could put enough pressure on the cleat laterally in a sprint to pull out.
    however, with Frog cleats, the cleats themselves aren't as robust as SPDs and I have broken the lightweight screws a few times once right at the starting line in a road race. That sucked. I'm actually considering giving SPDs another try just haven't got around to switching the pedals out yet.

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    One legged rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
    I truly hope the leg works out for you, it looks like it is an advance in this field. Why can't the mfgrs and insurance work together to provide this appliance to those like Punkncat can have them to better their life. No politics wanted here in my reply just a hope, I would gladly work for/with a foundation the raise funds and awareness for these types of appliances, along the lines of the Wounded Warrior group I support now. If anyone knows of one please post in this forum or shoot me a P.M. so we will know.

    Bill
    Just the way it is with the insurance. There are groups such as Challenged Athletes Foundation and Disabled Sports USA that do help people get adaptive equipment. The local Paralympic Sport Clubs help people get in touch with them. The support is out there but needs to be sought out.
    now, the leg that the OP had made is just a peg foot that attaches to the regular socket, and this particular device can be fabricated pretty easily and like he said, cheaply from spare parts laying around the shop. You see Paralympians with high speed carbon peg legs and things, but these only offer a real advantage to track racers, who rarely crash and for whom that aero advantage is biggest.
    in my opinion, for road riding, the durability offered by a metal leg with spare parts is actually an advantage, as all sorts of things can happen to damage a carbon blade peg leg.

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    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    Just as a suggestion....that peg is going to turn out to be a pita when you have to walk, as well as when trying to release from your pedal due to a lack of leverage. In my case, I opted for a higher category (stiffer due to weight bearing) foot with very little by way of tech...iirc it is a renegade foot, but could well be wrong. It doesn't flex much at all, and allows me to walk when off the bike and get enough rotation to release heel in.
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    Quote Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
    Just as a suggestion....that peg is going to turn out to be a pita when you have to walk, as well as when trying to release from your pedal due to a lack of leverage. In my case, I opted for a higher category (stiffer due to weight bearing) foot with very little by way of tech...iirc it is a renegade foot, but could well be wrong. It doesn't flex much at all, and allows me to walk when off the bike and get enough rotation to release heel in.
    This is a good suggestion. I go back and forth between my peg leg and my other cycling leg, which I got ahold of an extra foot that has no flex at all. I can't remember the model but its like the most basic foot on the market for very low activity people.
    i got lucky in a way in that I lost my leg in the war, so when I was at the army hospital Walter Reed there was no budget and they basically gave us all sorts of extra stuff.
    to be honest I can't tell any difference in how much power I can produce between the two legs. The advantage with the peg leg is less knee flexion, with a couple of downsides already mentioned.
    i really only wear my peg leg when I don't expect to get off the bike at all, which over the years I really have reduced my use of it more and more.
    im working on a design that is a bit more walking friendly though.
    Last edited by benajah; 10-30-12 at 10:29 AM.

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    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    The reduction in knee flexion is one advantage I would be happy to enjoy. I have found that with a lot of trial and error with seat positioning, and constant riding, a position that is pretty comfortable in that respect. So long as I don't go more than 3-4 days without riding my bad knee stays pretty "limber". The bad is that if I do skip more than that I go back to the cracking and popping and discomfort for a ride or two.
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    Quote Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
    Just as a suggestion....that peg is going to turn out to be a pita when you have to walk, as well as when trying to release from your pedal due to a lack of leverage. ....
    I have not tried to get a biking leg made, but have thought about it. Since I commute to work sometimes, and I do some tourist bike trips, I need a foot to walk on. I have an older Flex foot model around, if I ever choose to get a biking leg.

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    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    In my case it hasn't been so much "get" a riding leg as adapting one of my old walking legs for the purpose. I have found that having a higher rear trimline for my walking leg retains more comfort during the day as it allows for better compression around my knee. I have the doc. put two grooves into either side of the rear for tendon clearance, as well as making a small cavity for the tibia/fibia at the end due to the rotating motion that is not there for walking. So far it's worked out well enough. Until I can come up with $10+K to purchase my own, or an insurance company that is willing to help pay for something beyond "absolutely necessary" then I do what I have to.
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    Adapting an old leg socket does not work for me. I could reuse the foot from an old limb, but old sockets are too big.

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    One legged rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by punkncat View Post
    In my case it hasn't been so much "get" a riding leg as adapting one of my old walking legs for the purpose. I have found that having a higher rear trimline for my walking leg retains more comfort during the day as it allows for better compression around my knee. I have the doc. put two grooves into either side of the rear for tendon clearance, as well as making a small cavity for the tibia/fibia at the end due to the rotating motion that is not there for walking. So far it's worked out well enough. Until I can come up with $10+K to purchase my own, or an insurance company that is willing to help pay for something beyond "absolutely necessary" then I do what I have to.
    You know, I had my rear shelf on my last everyday wear leg cut real low for cycling, was a pin lock socket, nearly a full inch and a half below the bend in the knee. For the first six months of walking on it, it felt shaky, loose, partly due to the trimline, but no doubt partly due to me wearing suction sockets for the 3 prior years and not used to the different suspension. But after that my stump changed shape, adapted, filled in the loose areas, and for three years I wore that socket all day, every day, and it worked like a charm. And the rear trimline was really low. (to make up for the low trimline, it was really pushed into the back of my stump there though, lots of pressure). Im not sure I agree so much with the established medical idea that you need a high trimline, as long as you are an adaptable person and can deal with having it really tight at the trimline area thats clearing the tendons. Causes me skin problems that I have to deal with, but its a trade off.
    I just got a new socket with that clear plastic liner thats sort of flexible. the carbon is cut really low, like two and a half inches below my knee bend, but the flexible plastic insert is pretty high. I got the socket literally like 3 days ago so the jury is still out on how well the flexible plastic will work to correct having skin issues.
    Ive never had a dedicated riding leg built, just had my everyday wear sockets modified to be more cycling friendly...which was tricky because I do a lot of mountaineering and backpacking too...the two don't really go together prosthetics wise. I did build a dedicated peg leg foot, custom fabricated with a machinist, before the idea of building it out of normal off the shelf prosthetics items ever entered my mind.
    My peg leg cost about 200 bucks to build. The OPs foot (which I am copying BTW, thanks!, costs about 50 bucks)
    Last edited by benajah; 11-29-12 at 11:53 PM.

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    LBKA punkncat's Avatar
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    I can certainly understand the skin issues, I am laid up once again dealing with an ulcer behind the knee due to the compression on my skin. Your post lets me know I am not the only one who deals with this continuous issue.

    It strikes me as quite interesting the simple fact that all of us amputees deal with such a multitude of different issues and experiences with the actual device and foot and how we adapt and overcome those obstacles. It heartens me to see people doing what they want in spite of the amputation.
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