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Adaptive Cycling: Handcycles, Amputee Adaptation, Visual Impairment, and Other Needs Have a need for adaptive equipment to ride to compensate for a disability or loss of limb or function? This area is for discussion among those of us in the cycling world that are coming back from traumatic circumstances and tell the world, "No, you are not going to beat me down!"

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Old 10-03-13, 04:40 PM   #1
punkncat
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Resource for buying your own socks and liners?

Does anyone know of a reputable online source for socks and or locking liners?

I would like an online shop or supply I could source single, three, and five/six ply socks and who may carry a specific liner based on the "part number". I have found some pretty similar items searching diabetic needs but nothing specific to prosthesis aside from the supplies to actually pour and make your own liners. That was designed for the prop and special effect industry but was the same stuff even down to the pin umbrellas. Seeing as how I am not trained in such arts, I would rather buy it outright.
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Old 10-03-13, 07:20 PM   #2
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www.amputeesupply.com has some items. I have not used them, but they have answered a couple of questions for me.
Their selection is a bit limited.
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Old 10-04-13, 06:43 AM   #3
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Thanks for the link, but I agree...they are limited, and pricey. I was hoping to find a source where I can find these items for less than they are available at my doctor's office.
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Old 04-26-14, 12:59 PM   #4
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Try eBay.
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Old 03-29-15, 11:26 PM   #5
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Hi everyone,

[COLOR=#000000]I haven't been on a bike in years and I'm hoping somebody can help. I'm a BK Amp, and when I get on a bike, my prosthetic leg angles outward about 45deg at the toe.


_____________
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Old 03-30-15, 07:47 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Metora06 View Post
Hi everyone,

I haven't been on a bike in years and I'm hoping somebody can help. I'm a BK Amp, and when I get on a bike, my prosthetic leg angles outward about 45deg at the toe.
There are a couple of ways to address this. Most commonly what I do is use an older, looser fitting leg, and turn the foot "toed in" to avoid hitting the heel on the crank arm. Another method is to use pedal extenders to push past where your heel would strike with pedal placement. One other that some have used is creating a pylon only foot for use on the bike. There is some reading concerning this in various posts here....and welcome.
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Old 04-06-15, 08:17 AM   #7
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I had the same problem and here's what I did.

Added a pedal extender and pedals with toe cages. I also had my foot angled in just a little bit, but enough to make a difference without affecting my gait. I would suggest that if you go that route that you get smooth pedals and not the ones with protrusions sticking up. And don't make the toe straps too tight. If you need to get your foot off that pedal in a hurry, you want the least amount of resistance holding your foot in place. After several falls I learned to get my foot out of the toe clip way before i'm coming to a stop.

I know there must be other/better ways, but what I have works well for me.
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