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  1. #1
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    Bike for university - existing TrekFX7.3 or buy (& set up) another 'used' bike ?

    His existing Trek FX 7.3 was bought new some years ago at a very good 'prior-model-year' price (has 'deore' derailleurs + quick-release wheels + generally in good condition as he has not ridden a lot) and more importantly is all set up for to safely operate using only his left hand.
    I was initially reluctant to take his Trek to university due to concerns about it getting stolen - and have explored how to set-up the single-handed operation on an extra bike (see separate thread where I got some great advice).
    We never activated an additional bike as my son did not see the real need for one at university due to his then location.

    It is only now that he has moved into new accommodation further from the university that my son is wanting access to a bike.
    He thinks he can store the bike in his house - Regardless of which bike we will obviously need a good lock to secure bike while leaving bike unattended.

    On reflection I wonder if I am being unduly protective of the Trek which in reality is no longer a new bike and whose monetary (as opposed to any sentimental) value is presumably significantly less than what I paid. Thus why am I even thinking about getting an extra (used) bike with the hassle of getting it set up to operate safely with one hand ?

    Any advice / comments appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I would just stick with the 7.3 and practice both safe and smart locking practices. Most bikes that get stolen are either locked with a cheap cable lock or left out over night. If a bike isn't staying in the same place for the better part of the day (or god forbid over night) then theft is less of a concern. A good strategy with a u-lock is the way to go. If he's going to park the bike at the same place everyday, he could even keep a second u-lock on the rack for additional security but without the need to carry two u-locks on the bike.

    Call the university police force and ask them about the numbers on theft, what they think the best strategy is, etc. They are going to know best what you are up against on campus. I would say that being able to keep the bike indoors while he's home is necessity, a bike on a porch or in a garage in a college town would be a likely target.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    . ... Call the university police force and ask them about the numbers on theft, what they think the best strategy is, etc. They are going to know best what you are up against on campus. .
    Thanks - great idea.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    ... practice both safe and smart locking practices.....
    Have now spoken with Campus police - theft is clearly an issue on campus, but they felt that most relate to poor locking practices / easily removable items. They pretty much replicated your comments to reduce likelihood of becoming a statistic .

    Thanks again headloss

    [/SIZE]PS I know I am old-fashioned, but I seem to recall that in my day not many people would steal a bike which has clearly been set up for an owner with a limb difference .[/SIZE]

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan007 View Post
    Have now spoken with Campus police - theft is clearly an issue on campus, but they felt that most relate to poor locking practices / easily removable items. They pretty much replicated your comments to reduce likelihood of becoming a statistic .

    Thanks again headloss

    PS I know I am old-fashioned, but I seem to recall that in my day not many people would steal a bike which has clearly been set up for an owner with a limb difference .
    You wouldn't think that people would steal individual parts either... (not just talking front wheels, although it's not uncommon for someone to steal a wheel from one bike and the frame+wheel from another off of the same bikerack).

    Lots of tips in the forums if you search around. Put a ball bearing in all of the allen-head bolts and then fill the gaps with superglue or wax (both proven methods). Consider using theft-proof torx and allen bolts, the type with a pin that prevent the use of a standard allen/hex head wrench. There are companies such as pitlock that make locking skewers. You can replace quick releases on the wheels and seatpost with such devices. You can also run a chain through the frame and up through the saddle rails... in which case, it's common to slip the chain through an oil inner-tube first to protect the frame.

    It's a p.i.t.a. but a reality of campus life, especially larger urban campuses.
    Last edited by headloss; 09-07-14 at 03:31 PM.

  6. #6
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    Bikes and parts are easy to sell around large college campuses, so you do have to be careful. When I was a student, I kept a Kryptonite New York U-lock (very thick) on the bike rack I locked at regularly. I locked this around the rear wheel and seatpost. I used a second lighter U-lock around the front wheel and frame. I also had a thick Kryptonite security cable to secure my saddle through the slot or rails. As far as location goes, I parked it in front of the medical center where there was a lot of foot traffic and in some areas, security cameras. Always best to lock near a more expensive looking bike with fewer or weaker locking devices. My wife's bike had her SRAM Apex rear derailleur ripped off when parking in a less frequented area, but other than, no problems over a couple years.

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