Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 49
  1. #1
    Center of the Universe ngateguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    Bianchi San Remo, Norvara Intrepid MTB , Softride Solo 700, Specialized Allez
    Posts
    4,360
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What is a good mirror to buy

    I need to buy a mirror for ridding. bought one from my LBS but I don't like it. It is a helmet mirror and I don't seem to be using it right or something. I set it before I ride but all it seems to p/u when I rode is my back pack. I think since I was trying to save a buck it just maybe that it is cheap. I own more than one bike so I would prefer a helmet or glasses mount style. Which do you all find better? Can the glasses mount be interchanged?I own more than one set of specs. And finally is there a peticular brand that is better?
    :confused:
    Matthew 6

  2. #2
    Oh God, He's back! 1oldRoadie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    My Bikes
    Paramount
    Posts
    1,022
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I ride road and on the roads. And I use one of those larges oval shaped mirrors that fit in the end of the handlebar. I like it a lot better than the helmet type. It doesn't viberate as much and I can actually see what is behind me.
    I can't ride and Frown!

  3. #3
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    6,958
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    With my helmet mirror, I set it so it sees outwards at about a 10-degree angle, and when I want to see directly to the rear I just turn my head the 10 degrees. What I like about the helmet mirror is its flatness (gives accurate distances) and its aimability. Vibration isn't too bad on mine... on a coarse road surface it may be hard to cound the riders in a group at several hundred feet, but I can see the group and cars. I use a 3rd Eye model. They have a glasses mount model too.

    You might try the 10-degree trick before giving up on your existing one... good luck

  4. #4
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Winnipeg
    My Bikes
    Bikes: Giant hybrid, Trek 4500, Cannondale R800 Some commuting 20mi/day, mostly fitness riding - 20-50 mile rides
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use the third eye glasses mirror, and while it takes a bit of getting used to, it works great. I have mine adjusted so I have to turn my head slightly to see behind me, you just have to experiment to see what is best for you.

    I know what you mean about the back pack. I think it depends on how big or high the backpack is and your riding position, if it appears in the mirror.

    The mirror is interchangeable between glasses quite easily, however it doesn't fit quite as well on glasses with very thin temples.
    "...perhaps the world needs a little more Canada" - Jean Chretian, 2003.

  5. #5
    bici accumulatori pinerider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    My Bikes
    1982 Steve Bauer road bike, 1985 Custom Campy road bike, 1985 Nishiki International Touring Bike, 1992 Norco Bigfoot MTB, 1975 Raleigh Twenty folder, 1992 Vitus 979 road bike, 1996 Bianchi Premio road bike, 2002 Thin Blue LIne CO2 mountain bike,
    Posts
    853
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a 3rd eye Pro Model (Pro means it cost more - I paid $25 Cdn) helmet mirror and I love it. I can see behind me quickly from any riding position and never experienced vibration problems (maybe I don't go fast enough).
    I had a bar end mirror before, but found that by the time I've looked down, focused on the mirror and figured out what was behind me, I was no longer travelling in the direction I wanted to go. - this gets dangerous!!.
    I have noticed a problem seeing behind with a full backpack though. You just have to tilt your head a little differently when the backpack is full.
    Depending on how I store my helmet, sometimes I have to readjust the mirror (only takes a second) when I get back on the bike
    ...!

  6. #6
    Just Follow Your Feet! AlphaGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    My Bikes
    Volae Expedition, ActionBent Tidal Wave II, Nishiki Olympic, Giant Cypress
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have had the bar end mirror in the past, but for the last year or so, I have used the Third Eye glasses mount mirror. It works very welll. I like that I can easily view behind me on curves or whatever, with a quick pan view. Also, you don't have to have this appendage on your handlebar...You do however resemble Inspector Gadget. But hey, what do I care I'm AlphaGeek!
    Recumbents rock!

  7. #7
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Between Lecanto and Hernando Florida, 6 miles due west of the Withlacoochee Trail
    My Bikes
    I've had several since 1999 but have settled on my beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and 2011 Felt Z4. :-)
    Posts
    13,257
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a helmet mirror on both helmets and a handlebar mirror on my commuter. Never had a problem with the helmet mirrors.

    When riding the commuter I find I use the helmet mirror most of the time (use the handlebar mirror less than 20% of the time).

    I think the helmet mirrors are made by Rhode Gear.

    A backpack blocks your rear view so you may have to get a handlebar mounted mirror or get used to tilting your head way up to see behind you.
    Or you could get panniers.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2011 Felt Z4

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  8. #8
    A Heart Needs a Home Rich Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,387
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you always wear eye protection (and you should!) an eyeglass mirror can be more stable and easier to use than a helmet mirror. I use the "Take-a-look," which I highly recommend. It's all metal and acrylic, easy to mount and adapt and orient to your particular glasses and head.

    But any head-mount mirror takes practice to use.

    People often don't understand that with these mirrors you still have to turn your head, just as in a car you have to turn your head to see the outside rear-view mirror.

    You set the mirror while you're in riding position, so that you look sort of left and up (if you're in a keep-right country, anyway). With the mirror properly set, you'll find there's a point where the angle of your glance intersects with the angle of the mirror to give you a view of the street behind you. Once set, it will take a couple of rides for the glance to become natural and automatic, but it will.

    If you're just seeing your shoulder, you're probably not glancing far enough left. For most people it requires a definite head-turn.

    I find the Take-a-look to be an indispensible aid to merging left across city traffic, particularly when approaching a left turn on a multi-lane street. And the glance has become so natural that I find myself constantly trying to do it when just walking down the street.

    RichC

  9. #9
    Sumanitu taka owaci LittleBigMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    8,945
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My helmet mounted mirror was very good, indeed. Eventually, it couldn't stay straight in the wind. It would not maintain its position.

    I may go back to the mirror, as it worked well at first. But I've depended on looking back for quite a while, now.
    No worries

  10. #10
    Donating member Richard D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Faversham, Kent, UK
    Posts
    1,852
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a Blackburn helmet mirror which works well for me.

    Richard
    Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)

  11. #11
    Center of the Universe ngateguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Everett, WA
    My Bikes
    Bianchi San Remo, Norvara Intrepid MTB , Softride Solo 700, Specialized Allez
    Posts
    4,360
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thats what I like about this site, very helpful fellow pedalers with good advice. Thanks for all the help I think I am going to switch to an eyewear mount mirror it seems to make more sense for me. And yes Rich Clark I agree always wear eye protection. A hint if you do not already know, I buy inexpensive safety glasses some are actually semi stylish, that way when I leave them some place or lose them I am not out a bunch of money and they hold up to my abuse better than anything else I have found.
    Matthew 6

  12. #12
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
    My Bikes
    Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike
    Posts
    13,144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I feel much more secure with my mirror. Would not ride without it.. I suggest a rectangular mirror that attaches to your sunglasses. That way when you move your head about you see a greater percentage of what is behind you.. The mirror I use brand name is "Take A Look," you see far more than the little circular mirror..

  13. #13
    cycle-powered nathank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Munich Germany (formerly Portland OR, Texas)
    My Bikes
    '02 Specialized FSR, '03 RM Slayer, '99 Raleigh R700, '97 Norco hartail, '89 Stumpjumper
    Posts
    1,848
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ok, questions for all you helmet and glasses mirror users:

    i used a handle-bar mounted mirror for touring and found it pretty good, but my biggest complaint was it always got knocked around when i was parking the bike -- i basically could only lean it on the right side -- so i eventually took it off after my tour for commuting and such.

    now, i've never tried a helmet or glasses mirror, but it seems to me like it would be really easy to destroy it -- i take my glasses off and stuff them into my backpack or panniers when i get somewhere and then they go onto a desktop or into a drawer at home -- and my helmet gets leashed to my backpack and thrown around or in a pile of clothes and panniers at home... anyway, do you guys break or loose mirrors often? can they take this kind of for me "normal" beating?

    on the helmet mirrors - are they easy to take on and off? b/c i use the same helmet for off-road mountain biking and one tree branch would kill it i think...
    why drive when you can ride?
    now a fully certified German MTB Guide! (DAV)

  14. #14
    bici accumulatori pinerider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    My Bikes
    1982 Steve Bauer road bike, 1985 Custom Campy road bike, 1985 Nishiki International Touring Bike, 1992 Norco Bigfoot MTB, 1975 Raleigh Twenty folder, 1992 Vitus 979 road bike, 1996 Bianchi Premio road bike, 2002 Thin Blue LIne CO2 mountain bike,
    Posts
    853
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My helmet mirror is tucked up under the visor, so it doesn't get knocked around much. I store the helmet upside down, so the mirror doesn't really get in the way.
    The mirror can be partially disassembled, but not totaly removed. There is a large mounting pad with sticky stuff that stays on the helmet. You can always fold it out of the way if you're not going to use the mirror.
    I keep the mirror on for mountain biking, haven't noticed any problems. I think a branch heading for the mirror would likely poke you in the eye anyway.
    ...!

  15. #15
    Donating member Richard D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Faversham, Kent, UK
    Posts
    1,852
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Originally posted by nathank
    on the helmet mirrors - are they easy to take on and off? b/c i use the same helmet for off-road mountain biking and one tree branch would kill it i think...
    The Blackburn clips into a base that is afixed to the helmet. It will come out relatively easily if knocked but it doesn't break and clips in easily enough. I've never lost the mirror riding, but I've knocked it out of the base when shoving my helmet in a cupboard or pannier. Another minor problem is I find the position of the mirror needs adjusting before each ride, but then it only takes a few seconds...
    Currently riding an MTB with a split personality - commuting, touring, riding for the sake of riding, on or off road :)

  16. #16
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Fallbrook,Calif./Palau del Vidre, France
    My Bikes
    Klein QP, Fuji touring, Surly Cross Check, BCH City bike
    Posts
    13,144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Anyone have luck with mirror that attaches to inside of glasses? Do they work..?

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't wear glasses so can't comment, I ride using the Bike-Eye rear view mirror, once you get used to it it's ideal on the mountain bike or racing bike either sitting up or down on the bars, It doesn't work if your riding with panniers or anything that blocks the viewing angle on the side the mirrors mounted, It,s an alternative if you can't get on with other mirrors. For more info search for bike-eye on google.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    268
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like the one from Bike Peddler. It's mainly glasses mount, but comes with a little plastic tab to convert it to helmet mount. I wear it on the glasses in summer, just switched it to helmet because I'm wearing goggles over my glasses for winter. Works great on glasses, OK on helmet (might be better but it's fighting with my goggles).

  19. #19
    Still Newbie way124's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Guelph, ON
    My Bikes
    A 1992 Norco road bike
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have this and it works well. Pretty easy to adjust, so I don't mind doing it everyday. Pretty good visibility. Doesn't shake excessively. All in all useful, as I rarely do shoulder checks now.

    http://www.mirrycle.com/default.htm

  20. #20
    Listen to me powers2b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Lexus Texas
    Posts
    2,791
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personal experience:
    Handle bar mirrors:
    vibrate and are not effective on curvy roads.
    Helmet mirrors:
    have a tendancy to shake (although minor) and shift as the helmet does on bumpy roads.
    Eyglass mirrors:
    light and located at the point of use and do not seem to shake or shift (assuming your glasses are snug)
    The elongated oval variety seem to offer a larger view but I am comfortable with small round ones as well.
    Enjoy

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Alabama USA
    My Bikes
    TREK 1000c
    Posts
    535
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I tried three types of mirrors (two for handlebars, one for helmet). First was end of bar mounted. I found that certain hand positions would cause my arm to block the line of sight to the mirror. Second mirror mounted on the brake bump. Had to adjust the mirror to it's limits to get close to seeing what needed to be seen. It would readjust itself due to road vibrations. Both these mirrors vibrated and made blurry views.
    I finally ended with a helmet mount. I too had to figure out the knack of seeing behind me. I had to raise my head slightly above normal and turn my head to the side about 10 degrees. Once you catch on, you'll find you can really look all over the place behind you just by turning your head a little. And your body dampens the road vibrations so the view is surprisingly clear.
    The only minus I've found is this mirror type forms a small blind spot in your forward peripheral vision. Just remember to check the blind spot regularly for cars, kids, etc.
    tippy (newbie)

  22. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    Trek 1000, wheeler manhattan
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found a helmet with a built in mirror. It looks directly behind me. All I need to do is glance up and I can see whatever is behind me. They advertise it as 363 degree view technology. If I want to look at something that is more to the left or right and behind me I just turn my head a little either way. I think this is great and I never have a problem with it breaking or getting knocked out of true because it is on top of my head not on a side. I cannot think of riding without it.
    I'm just another vehicle on the road.

    "I used to be concieted...but now I'm perfect."

  23. #23
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,557
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another vote for the Take a look mirror. I took me over a week to really get used to it. Did you go back to the bike shop and have them show you how to adjust it? This mirror will mount on the helmet or the glasses. I found my glasses were less vibration.

    The problem with handlebar mirrors is that you have to have your head in the same place for the mirror to work. Also when you get used to a glasses or helmet mirror you can look all around behind you. I think you just have an adjustment problem. My LBS sells a lot of the Take a look mirror, there are many of them around.

  24. #24
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    My Bikes
    2 many
    Posts
    13,557
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by John Ridley
    I like the one from Bike Peddler. It's mainly glasses mount, but comes with a little plastic tab to convert it to helmet mount. I wear it on the glasses in summer, just switched it to helmet because I'm wearing goggles over my glasses for winter. Works great on glasses, OK on helmet (might be better but it's fighting with my goggles).
    I drilled holes in the plastic piece and riveted it to the strap on my goggles for winter. It works well.
    I always mount it on my glasses in the summer.

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A good mirror is one that you personally get on with, and the environment you are using it in. I ride using the Bike-Eye rear view mirror it suits my needs, it fits into the head and down tube, a great awareness aid on group rides and racing. to get more of an idea of how it works have a look on the web site Bike-Eye.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •