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  1. #1
    Senior Member trmcgeehan's Avatar
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    Where will my bike be safe?

    I drive a shuttle bus, which is parked at a busy Shell station on a major road in my town. I want to ride my bike to work at 6 a.m., and secure it somewhere with a heavy cable lock. It will be there all day, until 5 p.m. The Shell station has a stand alone pay phone, which would enable me to lock the bike to the base in back of the phone. It would not be in the way of any phone users. It would be visible from the gas station and from the busy road 50 yards away. Or, I could lock it to a secure metal railing in the back of an adjoining Office Depot. This is not visible from the road, and does not have much traffic except semi trucks coming in and out. Question is: Is my bike safer locked where it is visible or where it is in a remote location? I plan to take off the front light and computer. Bike is a 1980 Univega in good shape (new tires, etc.) Whatdoyathink?
    "I am a true laborer. I earn that I eat, get that I wear, owe no man hate, envy no man's happiness, glad of other men's good, content with my harm." As You Like It, Act 3, Scene 2. Shakespeare.
    "Deep down, I'm pretty superficial." Ava Gardner.

  2. #2
    Totally Bent Bianchiriderlon's Avatar
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    It is always best to lock bikes in plain view. Thieves love secluded bikes because they can take their time defeating the lock(s). I would make sure that the Shell station is OK with your plan. They might not want the liability of a bike parked on their property day after day.

    Charles in London (ON)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Road and Fix, Tutto Campagnolo, certo!
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    Lock it securely, and then strap it to the roof of your bus.

    On a more serious note: can you take the wheels with you? It'll be less attractive to thieves if it cannot be immediately ridden.
    ...just say shimaNO

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Speak to the people in the Shell station to make sure that they wont have it removed. Get several locks - chains and U's and leave them locked there when your bike is away. Good idea to take wheel and/or seat with you.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Swami'sPrincess's Avatar
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    In San Diego most of the buses have a bike rack on front- you should see if you can get one on your bus so that you can lock your bike on it and there will be no doubt it'll be safe. You employer should be happy that you are riding your bike to work! What a great example you are setting for your co workers and the public you drive around. Good job!

  6. #6
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    In the past, I have left bikes chained to sign posts, guard rails, etc. for the entire workday in west Los Angeles. As long as the lock was robust and the bike LOOKED like a real beater, I never had a problem. I have always kept at least one beater in my bike stable; right now, it's the UO-8.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  7. #7
    Banned.
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    It's an old bike, and I understand it's your only bike, but you need to buy a second lock, get a U-Bolt lock from Kryptonite AND use your cable lock; there is no need to buy a expensive chain lock because by the time you add the cost of a U-Bolt lock you've exceeded the value of your bike in locks! These two different types (cable and U-Bolt) of locks require the thief to have to have two different kind of tools to get it. The cable is easily defeated but the U-bolt is not, either way two different kind of tools means more time spent trying to steal your bike and more stuff the thief has to carry. Make sure whatever you attach it to is very robust, meaning it can't be taken out of the ground, bent, sawed through or lift the bike over it. Follow the directions on how to properly use a U-lock, most people fail to do that and the bike is stolen. Don't worry about the insurance coverage the U-Bolt lock company has because collecting on it would be nearly impossible! Read the directions for how to handle a claim and you'll see.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    remove front wheel and lock the bike to a street sign thru the frame and both wheels, if someone wants it that bad, they will be taking it anyway

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