Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,384
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    The NYC Report on Cycling Injuries and Fatalities

    There may be a few threads that touch on this already, but for the truly lazy here's a link to the report just released on bike fatalities and injuries in NYC fron 1996 - 2005. Highlights include:

    • 92% of fatalities involved motor vehicles
    • 89% of crashes happened at intersections
    • Only one fatal crash occurred in a bike lane
    • Riders were not wearing helmets in 97% of fatalities
    • 74% of fatal crashes involved a head injury
    • 49% of injuries were strictly head injuries
    • Cyclists were only 6% of all transportation deaths
    • most fatalities (38%) occured between 3pm - 8pm
    • Who's responsible?
    42% = cyclist only at fault
    20% = vehicle only at fault
    36% = both bike & vehicle
    • What is the cyclist doing wrong?
    38% = disregarding traffic laws
    20% = not paying attention
    • And last but not least, 11 pedestrians killed by cyclists during the entire period. C'mon people, you're not trying hard enough!


    Of course, NYC is a unique urban environment, and factors in play in NYC are unlikely to apply in, for example, suburban or rural environments. But it definitely seems like for those of us who play in traffic, the rational course of action is to wear a helmet, obey traffic laws, pay attention, be extra careful when riding behind large vehicles, and stick to bike lanes where possible.

    Have fun with the report....

  2. #2
    Banned. Helmet Head's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    13,075
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What percentage of road miles have bike lanes in NYC? The lack of bike lane fatalities could be simply because there are so few bike lanes, not because cyclists are any safer in the bike lanes.

  3. #3
    genec genec's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    san diego
    My Bikes
    custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2
    Posts
    23,052
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmet Head
    What percentage of road miles have bike lanes in NYC? The lack of bike lane fatalities could be simply because there are so few bike lanes, not because cyclists are any safer in the bike lanes.
    They may not be safer... but it sure appears as though BL are not as deadly as some "experts" believe

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    7,283
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmet Head
    What percentage of road miles have bike lanes in NYC? The lack of bike lane fatalities could be simply because there are so few bike lanes, not because cyclists are any safer in the bike lanes.
    You mean bike/car accidents happen where bicyclists are found? Just like SBHikes and I have been saying?

  5. #5
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,384
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmet Head
    What percentage of road miles have bike lanes in NYC? The lack of bike lane fatalities could be simply because there are so few bike lanes, not because cyclists are any safer in the bike lanes.
    I didn't see a specific stat on that -- but I do believe it's a small percentage. A very very rough guess, based on the NYC bike map, is 5% or less.

    The report isolates a few "hot spots" for bike fatalities. I believe that only one of them has on-street bike lanes (Bergen Ave in Brooklyn).

    Also FYI, at least 4 of the major MUP's run around the perimiters of the boroughs, and as a result have minimal interaction with vehicular traffic. For the period covered by the report, I only see 3 fatalities on those routes, although I believe there was one (maybe two?) well-publicized deaths on the West Side Greenway. (Guy riding at night, no lights, no helmet, struck by a sanitation vehicle).

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1
    Posts
    8,851
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For those accidents that happened at intersections, since the bike lane ends at the intersection like all pavement stripes do, are those accidents not considered "bike lane accidents" even though they occurred on a bike laned road? Something tells me that those intersection accidents are treated as a seperate entity and the bike lane is disregarded as a factor.

  7. #7
    Sumanitu taka owaci LittleBigMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    8,945
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to muddy the waters, but I clicked in the underlined link and got only a pdf cover page. So after a little Googling, I found this interesting document:

    http://www.nysgtsc.state.ny.us/media/ShareTheRoad.pdf

    "A bicycle or in-line skating path is separate from a roadway, and a bicyclist or in-line skater may use either. In some cases, a roadway may be safer than a nearby bicycle or in-line skating path, as well as more convenient."

    "Bicyclists and in-line skaters may travel two abreast on a shoulder, lane or path intended for bicycling and skating use only if there is sufficient space. However, they must be single file when passing parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians and other bicyclists or in-line skaters."

    "Never assume bicyclists will position themselves on the road as far to the right as possible. Experienced bicyclists often ride in the center of the traffic lane as much as three to four feet from the curb or row of parked cars. This allows them room, and time, to avoid road hazards. It also helps them to be noticed more easily by other bicyclists, pedestrians, in-line skaters and non-motorized scooter operators, and motorists."

    "Be aware that when the road is too narrow for cars and bikes to ride safely side-by-side, bicyclists and in-line skaters should ride in or near the center of the lane to discourage motorists from trying to pass them."


    I never knew in-line skaters had the same rights as vehicle operators. Fine with me! But I'd bet most motorists would lose a lot of money betting on this one. Then, this is New York State, not Georgia...
    Last edited by LittleBigMan; 09-14-06 at 01:08 PM.
    No worries

  8. #8
    Senior Member Hambone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
    My Bikes
    GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
    I didn't see a specific stat on that -- but I do believe it's a small percentage. A very very rough guess, based on the NYC bike map, is 5% or less.

    The report isolates a few "hot spots" for bike fatalities. I believe that only one of them has on-street bike lanes (Bergen Ave in Brooklyn).

    Also FYI, at least 4 of the major MUP's run around the perimiters of the boroughs, and as a result have minimal interaction with vehicular traffic. For the period covered by the report, I only see 3 fatalities on those routes, although I believe there was one (maybe two?) well-publicized deaths on the West Side Greenway. (Guy riding at night, no lights, no helmet, struck by a sanitation vehicle).
    Is the accident you site the one a few months ago? The one with the doctor who was riding home from dinner with his wife? I never read he had no light. He was struck by an NYPD tow truck (not Sanitation.) It is a well lit area and short of a spinning volunteer fireman light on top of his head, I bet lighting would not have done much to change things.

    That death highlights how critically one must read these reports.

    The NYPD declared that the tow truck driver was not at fault. Based on the traffic patterns and the rules of the road, there is no way that accident happened without the NYPD driver having been at fault! Either 100% at fault or shared culpability.
    Inside me is a thin man dying to get out.
    (He is kept comfortable by some pie, a half case of Bud, two cheese-dogs and a big screen Sony.)

  9. #9
    Senior Member Hambone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
    My Bikes
    GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Helmet Head
    What percentage of road miles have bike lanes in NYC? The lack of bike lane fatalities could be simply because there are so few bike lanes, not because cyclists are any safer in the bike lanes.
    Isn't the more important question how many rider miles are in bike lanes versus on the general road?

    I'm new to the A&S forum but have seent his question a few times.

    We don't have huge percentage of bike lanes but NYC has BL routes to much of the city. My commute is 14 miles each way (from Brooklyn to Harlem) and I could do 99% of it on BLs. ("Could" because I prefer hillier Riverside Drive to the Greenway Path.)
    Inside me is a thin man dying to get out.
    (He is kept comfortable by some pie, a half case of Bud, two cheese-dogs and a big screen Sony.)

  10. #10
    52-week commuter DCCommuter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    Redline Conquest, Cannonday, Specialized, RANS
    Posts
    1,929
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone
    That death highlights how critically one must read these reports.

    The NYPD declared that the tow truck driver was not at fault. Based on the traffic patterns and the rules of the road, there is no way that accident happened without the NYPD driver having been at fault! Either 100% at fault or shared culpability.
    That's exactly what I thought when I read the stats claiming that cyclists were at fault in a majority of accidents. Keep this in mind: for the most part, when a cyclist is killed by a car, there are two witnesses. One of them, the cyclist, is dead. The other, the motorist, probably didn't see the cyclist or he wouldn't have hit him. The motorist also has an interest in describing the accident in terms that limits his liability -- I've seen lots of accidents reported where the driver says something along the lines of I was driving along and the cyclist swerved in front of my. Right. And the cops only get the driver's story if he sticks around -- according to an earlier study, in roughly 30% of fatal accidents in NYC the driver is never identified.

    So I would be leary of any report that purports to analyze the circumstances of accidents. I don't buy the bike lane usage numbers in this report either for the same reason.
    The United States of America is the only democratic nation in the world to deny citizens living in the nation's capital representation in the national legislature. District residents have no vote in either the U.S. Senate or U.S. House of Representatives. www.dcvote.org

  11. #11
    Car-Free Flatlander Stacy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Below 14th Street
    My Bikes
    Sirrus
    Posts
    1,976
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting discussion about this on NYC Public Radio Brian Lehrer's radio show entitled Wheeling and Dealing
    with Noah Budnick, of Transportation Alternatives and Iris Weinshall , New York City Department of Transportation Commissioner - on the city's effort to make biking in New York safe


    http://www.wnyc.org/shows/bl/episodes/2006/09/14
    Last edited by Stacy; 09-14-06 at 01:17 PM.

  12. #12
    52-week commuter DCCommuter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    Redline Conquest, Cannonday, Specialized, RANS
    Posts
    1,929
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here are some stats from the body of the report:
    53% of fatalities on arterial (4 lane or more lanes)
    40% on local streets
    7% on limited access highways (where cycling is prohibited)

    89% of fatalities at intersections
    11% midblock

    If you assume that the midblock fatalities include the limited access highways, which by definition have no intersections, the conclusion is that virtually all fatalities on city streets happen at intersections.
    The United States of America is the only democratic nation in the world to deny citizens living in the nation's capital representation in the national legislature. District residents have no vote in either the U.S. Senate or U.S. House of Representatives. www.dcvote.org

  13. #13
    52-week commuter DCCommuter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Washington, DC
    My Bikes
    Redline Conquest, Cannonday, Specialized, RANS
    Posts
    1,929
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone
    Isn't the more important question how many rider miles are in bike lanes versus on the general road?
    Here's what the report says:
    Quote Originally Posted by report
    Marked bicycle lanes are areas on roadways that are clearly delineated for use by bicyclists. Bicycle lanes are located on city streets, and in parks where the lanes are shared with pedestrians. Using the NYC DOT’s database of bicycle lanes, fatal crashes were examined for their proximity to marked bicycle lanes.
    Only one fatal crash with a motor vehicle occurred in a marked bicycle lane. This fatality occurred in Prospect Park, as a result of a motor vehicle colliding with a bicyclist. A total of 10 other fatal crashes occurred in or near a marked bicycle lane. Six fatal bicycle crashes with motor vehicles occurred in close proximity to, but not inside of, a marked bicycle lane. One fatality occurred on a city street near a bicycle lane, but did not involve a motor vehicle. The last three fatalities occurred inside a marked bicycle lane located within a park, but did not involve a motor vehicle.
    The United States of America is the only democratic nation in the world to deny citizens living in the nation's capital representation in the national legislature. District residents have no vote in either the U.S. Senate or U.S. House of Representatives. www.dcvote.org

  14. #14
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,384
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone
    Is the accident you site the one a few months ago? The one with the doctor who was riding home from dinner with his wife? I never read he had no light. He was struck by an NYPD tow truck (not Sanitation.) It is a well lit area and short of a spinning volunteer fireman light on top of his head, I bet lighting would not have done much to change things.
    Yep, that's the one. I've been there at night, it did not strike me as particularly "well-lit," certainly not well enough to replace lights. Cyclists at night without lights are damned near invisible.

    Unfortunately I can't find the article that mentioned lights and I may be wrong on that point. I see few people who ride with lights but without a helmet, though, so I think that's a reasonable induction.


    That death highlights how critically one must read these reports.
    ...? The report does not cover 2006, so I'm not really sure how that's relevant. Since that individual was not wearing a helmet, died from head injuries, was male, there were not dozens of deaths on that Greenway in 2006 etc., I do not see how that single incident produces a concise critique of a multi-year statistical analysis of the available crash data.


    Based on the traffic patterns and the rules of the road, there is no way that accident happened without the NYPD driver having been at fault! Either 100% at fault or shared culpability.
    ...? There are cyclist-only traffic lights on those intersections of the Greenway. If the cyclist runs a red light and gets hit, it's exclusively the cyclists' fault, as they are the one who violated the traffic laws. In the same fashion, if you're in a car, you run a red light and get hit by another car, you are 100% at fault. Being on a bike does not alter that allocation of responsibility.


    Quote Originally Posted by DCCommuter
    When a cyclist is killed by a car, there are two witnesses. One of them, the cyclist, is dead. The other, the motorist, probably didn't see the cyclist or he wouldn't have hit him.
    Dead people do not qualify as "witnesses." In the incident on the Greenway, there were two witnesses -- the driver and another cyclist.


    The motorist also has an interest in describing the accident in terms that limits his liability -- I've seen lots of accidents reported where the driver says something along the lines of I was driving along and the cyclist swerved in front of my. Right.
    Anyone who's in an accident of any sort is highly likely to describe the accident to their advantage. Riding a bicycle does not magically increase the integrity of one's statements or one's ability to process an event in a more objective fashion.

    I can't even tell you the number of times I've seen cyclists engaged in unsafe behavior: running lights and stop signs, wrong-way cycling, no helmet, no lights at night, etc. So in NYC, that 46% figure sounds like it's in the right ballpark to me....

  15. #15
    Senior Member Bruce Rosar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    My Bikes
    Road, Mtn, Tandem
    Posts
    760
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by LittleBigMan
    I never knew in-line skaters had the same rights as vehicle operators.
    BTW, vehicle operators in most (all?) states don't have rights just because they're vehicle operators. Everyone has an equal right to travel the public's ways (including the roads) just by virtue of being a member of the public.

    Traveling while operating a heavy vehicle (i.e., car, truck, etc.) is limited by the government because of the extraordinary danger that poses to other members of the public and their property. In contrast, human powered travel (whether on wheels or feet) rarely (never?) poses that much danger to others.
    Humantransport.org: Advocacy on behalf of humans traveling under their own power

  16. #16
    Car-Free Flatlander Stacy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Below 14th Street
    My Bikes
    Sirrus
    Posts
    1,976
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hambone
    Is the accident you site the one a few months ago? The one with the doctor who was riding home from dinner with his wife? I never read he had no light. He was struck by an NYPD tow truck (not Sanitation.) It is a well lit area and short of a spinning volunteer fireman light on top of his head, I bet lighting would not have done much to change things.

    That death highlights how critically one must read these reports.

    The NYPD declared that the tow truck driver was not at fault. Based on the traffic patterns and the rules of the road, there is no way that accident happened without the NYPD driver having been at fault! Either 100% at fault or shared culpability.
    More likely the report is referring to Keith Alexander Bonanno, 41, who lost control and hit his head on the guardrail, while riding on the Shore Parkway Greenway, in Brooklyn, in 2005.

    The Shore Parkway has recently been restored and repaved.
    http://www.transalt.org/press/media/2006/428.html

  17. #17
    Senior Member Hambone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
    My Bikes
    GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I printed and read the whole thing last night.

    I'll clear up a few things I said which were wrong or unclear.

    About several references to the doctor who was killed by the NYPD tow truck on the greenway. I was clearing up the inaccuracies of the post to which I was replying. I was not suggesting that that accident was covered in the report.

    And I was addressing the fact that the NYPD has yet to say their driver bore any responsibility for the death.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
    There are cyclist-only traffic lights on those intersections of the Greenway. If the cyclist runs a red light and gets hit, it's exclusively the cyclists' fault, as they are the one who violated the traffic laws.
    The tow truck was driving parallel to the path. I could be wrong but I believe the lights for the truck and the lights for the cyclist are the same.

    Furthermore, there are signs there saying that motor vehicles crossing the path are obligated to yield to bicycles and pedestrians. The driver did not yield.

    Even furthermore, in NYS enforcing one's right of way is not a defense for having caused an accident.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe
    Anyone who's in an accident of any sort is highly likely to describe the accident to their advantage. Riding a bicycle does not magically increase the integrity of one's statements or one's ability to process an event in a more objective fashion.

    I can't even tell you the number of times I've seen cyclists engaged in unsafe behavior: running lights and stop signs, wrong-way cycling, no helmet, no lights at night, etc. So in NYC, that 46% figure sounds like it's in the right ballpark to me....
    How do you address this: in fatal crashes the cyclist is solely at fault 42% (not 46% -- I'm not quibbling over the 4% just being accurate.)

    When the motorist doesn't kill the cyclist but only hurts them real bad and the cyclist is able to actually give their impression, the cyclist is solely at fault 13% of the time. (The report made the point several posters here made that when a motor vehicle operator strikes and kills a cyclist, there is one fewer witnesses for the cyclist.)

    Having read the whole thing I found it a much better report than I thought it would be.
    Inside me is a thin man dying to get out.
    (He is kept comfortable by some pie, a half case of Bud, two cheese-dogs and a big screen Sony.)

  18. #18
    Senior Member Hambone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bootiful Brooklyn, NY
    My Bikes
    GT Edge for the road/Specialized Hopper (well the frame and the bb, everything else is new) for the dirt
    Posts
    2,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In ten years not one cyclist was killed by a cab?

    I find that hard to believe?
    Inside me is a thin man dying to get out.
    (He is kept comfortable by some pie, a half case of Bud, two cheese-dogs and a big screen Sony.)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •