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Old 09-16-06, 06:49 AM   #1
ukmtk
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Research?

Is anyone aware of research that demonstrates the negative effects that vulnerable road users (i.e. pedestrians/cyclists) suffer whilst being in close proximity to fast moving traffic?

Any pointers to research (especially online) would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 09-16-06, 07:13 AM   #2
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I was recently struck by a piece of news that stated something along the lines that the fatality rate of a pedestrian struck by a moving car was 3 times greater at 35MPH than at 25.

Note - not certain of the exact speeds but if you search for "car pedestrian speed fatality rate" you might find the article.

I think that in any environment were people and cars mix the maximum permitted speed should be no more than 25 MPH. Anyone exceeding this speed should be treated with the same gravity as someone randomly firing a gun through a crowd.
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Old 09-16-06, 07:23 AM   #3
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Here's one link - I'm sure you will be able to find similair ones ...

Quote:
Pedestrians involved in crashes are more likely to be killed as vehicle speed increases. The fatality rate for a pedestrian hit by a car at 20 mph is 5 percent. The fatality rate rises to 80 percent when vehicle speed is increased to 40 mph.

Pedestrian Safety at Intersections
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Old 09-16-06, 07:55 AM   #4
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Thanks for the reply.

This website has some frightening statistics for the direct effects of speeding traffic http://www.rospa.co.uk/roadsafety/toptentips/index.htm.

I was actually interested in research that demonstrates "negative mental effects" such as increased fear or anxiety. My fault entirely as it was in my head but not what I actually typed!
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Old 09-16-06, 09:02 AM   #5
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Like what, stress, fear? that sort of thing? Edit: sorry, I missed that part of your thread--just woke up!
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Old 09-16-06, 09:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slow Train
I was recently struck by a piece of news that stated something along the lines that the fatality rate of a pedestrian struck by a moving car was 3 times greater at 35MPH than at 25.
It ain't that hard to figure out why: E=mv²
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Old 09-16-06, 09:19 AM   #7
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You might find a start here--there are several links within.

http://pubsindex.trb.org/document/vi...sp?lbid=413763
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Old 09-16-06, 01:28 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukmtk
Is anyone aware of research that demonstrates the negative effects that vulnerable road users (i.e. pedestrians/cyclists) suffer whilst being in close proximity to fast moving traffic?

Any pointers to research (especially online) would be greatly appreciated.
I do not know of any research or if any has ever been done.

Negative effects that vulnerable road users suffer while in close proximity with fast movhing traffic seems like a very broad subject. A negative effect could be anything from stress caused by the noise of traffic to being hit by a motor vehicle. Are there any specifics you are looking for or can you narrow it down a bit.
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Old 09-17-06, 04:16 AM   #9
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I am aware of the following article:

Kiyota, M., Vandebona, U., Sumi, T., and Kim, H. (2000a) Physiological measurement of risk perception of
pedestrians in passing traffic, Selected Proceedings of the 8th World Conference on Transport, Pergamon
Press, ISBN 0080435904, pp. 57-69.

This measured raised anxiety levels in pedestrians close to fast moving bicycles (increased heart rates). The research was regarding shared foot/cycle paths. I was wondering if anyone was aware of any similar research regarding pedestrians/cyclists in close proximity to fast moving vehicles.
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