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  1. #1
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    Drunk Driver Kills Bicyclist on Manhattan Bike Path

    Drunken Driver Kills Rider on Bicycle Path, Police Say

    By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and KATE HAMMER, The New York Times
    Published: December 3, 2006
    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/03/ny...=1&oref=slogin

    A drunken driver mistakenly turned onto a Hudson River bike path in Manhattan and drove nearly a mile before killing a 22-year-old bicyclist Friday night, the police said yesterday.

    The driver, Eugenio Cidron of East Fourth Street, left a party at the Chelsea Piers sports complex and drove his silver BMW down the bike path, hitting the cyclist, Eric Ng, around 9:40 p.m., according to the police.

    Mr. Ng was hit near the intersection of West Street and Clarkson Street. The force of the impact mangled his bicycle and sent one of his sneakers into the air. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

    Mr. Cidron, 27, was arrested and charged with vehicular manslaughter, reckless endangerment and driving while intoxicated, the authorities said. When reached by phone, Mr. Cidron declined to comment.

    Mr. Ng was active in Time’s Up, a New York-based environmental group that promotes cycling as an alternative to driving. He was at least the second cyclist struck by a vehicle and killed this year on the path, a popular route for the city’s riders, and one that pedestrians and motor vehicles from several city departments also use.

    In June, Dr. Carl H. Nacht, a 56-year-old physician, died after being struck by a police tow truck as he rode on his bicycle along the path near West 38th Street.

    The path is intersected at many points by roadways that connect the West Side Highway to sites including the sports complex, a city waste transfer station and a police impound lot.

    Mr. Cidron traveled south along a cobblestone access road after leaving a Chelsea Piers parking facility and apparently meant to turn onto the West Side Highway, park workers said yesterday morning.

    But he cut his turn short and ended up on the bicycle path instead.

    To do so, he had to drive over or around a narrow, three-foot plastic pylon mounted south of where the bike path intersects the Chelsea Piers access road. The park workers repaired the pylon yesterday.

    It was the only physical barrier visible yesterday anywhere along the section of the path where Mr. Cidron had driven.

    Though Mr. Cidron’s wrong turn appeared to be accidental, some cyclists who frequent the path — one of the quickest routes for cyclists to travel in Manhattan — say they have been dismayed at what they described as a recent increase in vehicles traveling along it.

    “I have seen passenger cars, limousines, taxis and contractor’s vehicles including those of the Police, Sanitation and Parks Department,” said Philipp Rassmann, 38, a member of Time’s Up. He complained that the pylons placed along the path are often removed by workers and left on the side of the path.

    Mr. Rassmann also said that the area around Chelsea Piers was especially dangerous because of an array of crisscrossing car, bus and taxi lanes with few signs.

    Paul Steely White, the executive director of Transportation Alternatives, which advocates measures to make cycling safer, said that the bike path was one of the safest in the city, which sometimes “lulls people into a false sense of security.”

    Mr. Ng was an avid biker and often participated in group bike rides known as Critical Mass, his friends said. Until recently, he rode an old bike handed down from his father, but in August he purchased a brand-new bike, painted it silver and blue, and named it Adeline.

    Reached at home in East Brunswick, N.J., Mr. Ng’s father, Tony Ng, said he was “a great son” who had worked hard in school and found joy in his budding career as a teacher. He had recently graduated from the Department of Education’s teaching fellow program and had been substitute teaching at Automotive High School in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, while waiting for permanent placement, his friends said.

    “He loved the kids. He had a rapport with them,” Tony Ng said.

    The police said that Mr. Ng’s new bike had been equipped with reflectors, but that they could not tell if it had bike lights. Both are required by city law.

    Mr. Ng’s father said he had installed the reflectors on his son’s new bike personally, and had urged him to wear a helmet — optional for riders 14 and over — when riding. The police said that Mr. Ng was not wearing a helmet when he was hit.

    Mr. Ng graduated this year from New York University, where he majored in math, friends said. He lived with friends in Greenpoint.

    “He was just a real joyous, smart, sweet, good person,” said Ryan Nuckle, 25, a friend and fellow cyclist. “He was always smiling, and I was always happy to see him.”

    Cara Buckley contributed reporting.

  2. #2
    Senior Member tomcryar's Avatar
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    A couple or three concrete/steel poles at the entrance/exit could have prevented this. It leaves plenty of room for cyclists or pedestrians, but nothing else.

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    They don't wan't to do that exactly because it would make it harder for people to drive on the MUP.

    The rangers, police, contractors and maintenance personnel all drive on the MUP.

    It would be terribly inconvenient for them.

    So, watch your backs.


    Quote Originally Posted by tomcryar
    A couple or three concrete/steel poles at the entrance/exit could have prevented this. It leaves plenty of room for cyclists or pedestrians, but nothing else.

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    Senior Member tomcryar's Avatar
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    Tough for them, better for safety.

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    Señor Wences jwbnyc's Avatar
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    When it comes down to convenience or bicyclists' lives here - convenience wins.

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    why do we have a "vehicular manslaughter"?
    so that the jury in the case will go "he was in a car, it's not like he meant it"?

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    genec genec's Avatar
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    A fairly new MUP here in the San Diego area has been "mared" during it's short life by about 6 new "entries" created by motorists.

    I am not sure how or why this happens, but the path has been violated in several places where motorists have left the roadway, crashed in through the chainlink fence, and then shortly later have crashed out through the chainlink fence.

    The MUP is quite wide... perhaps some 14 feet, making for a nice two way path for cyclists. It is about 8 miles long and parallels a new freeway. The MUP has freeway like ramps for cyclists to use to connect with the main surface streets that run perpendicular to the MUP itself.

    The motorist "breakthrus" are quite obvious as they rip the chainlink from it's mountings and bend it in the direction in which they have gone through. In a couple of cases this caused a somewhat dangerous condition as the chainlink was then a "flap" out into the path of cyclists on the MUP. One morning I was quite surprised to see a section newly torn out near a light controlled intersection... it was pretty obvious that someone failed to make the turn and went onto the MUP vice the nearby freeway ramp... made me wonder just how out of control some motorists must be at times to do this sort of damage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrosseyedCrickt
    why do we have a "vehicular manslaughter"?
    so that the jury in the case will go "he was in a car, it's not like he meant it"?
    I know it doesn't seem like enough but considering that it is, IIRC, the first time in the last two years that charges have been filed in the death of a cyclist in NYC, it's something & a start, at least.

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    "The police said that Mr. Ng’s new bike had been equipped with reflectors, but that they could not tell if it had bike lights. Both are required by city law.

    "Mr. Ng’s father said he had installed the reflectors on his son’s new bike personally, and had urged him to wear a helmet — optional for riders 14 and over — when riding. The police said that Mr. Ng was not wearing a helmet when he was hit."

    So even though he was killed by a drunk driver on a bike path which is separated from the roadway by a stone wall and a lot of shrubbery, he still could have done more to prevent this from happening?

  10. #10
    N_C
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    Quote Originally Posted by trekets
    To do so, he had to drive over or around a narrow, three-foot plastic pylon mounted south of where the bike path intersects the Chelsea Piers access road. The park workers repaired the pylon yesterday.

    It was the only physical barrier visible yesterday anywhere along the section of the path where Mr. Cidron had driven.

    “I have seen passenger cars, limousines, taxis and contractor’s vehicles including those of the Police, Sanitation and Parks Department,” said Philipp Rassmann, 38, a member of Time’s Up. He complained that the pylons placed along the path are often removed by workers and left on the side of the path.

    Mr. Rassmann also said that the area around Chelsea Piers was especially dangerous because of an array of crisscrossing car, bus and taxi lanes with few signs.
    If the plastic pylon is what I am thinking it is it is very flexable & able to bend if hit by a vehicle with out damaging the vehicle. There are removable steel types that if hit by a car causes major damage to the vehicle. There are also the immovable type which are steel posts filled with concrete.

    It sounds like more signage is needed.

  11. #11
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by N_C
    If the plastic pylon is what I am thinking it is it is very flexable & able to bend if hit by a vehicle with out damaging the vehicle. There are removable steel types that if hit by a car causes major damage to the vehicle. There are also the immovable type which are steel posts filled with concrete.

    It sounds like more signage is needed.
    Forget the signage, put in steel pipes, or Bollards. Signs have to be read and understood... obviously the driver in this case doesn't even understand the concept of "do not drink and drive."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by genec
    A fairly new MUP here in the San Diego area has been "mared" during it's short life by about 6 new "entries" created by motorists.

    I am not sure how or why this happens, but the path has been violated in several places where motorists have left the roadway, crashed in through the chainlink fence, and then shortly later have crashed out through the chainlink fence.

    The MUP is quite wide... perhaps some 14 feet, making for a nice two way path for cyclists. It is about 8 miles long and parallels a new freeway. The MUP has freeway like ramps for cyclists to use to connect with the main surface streets that run perpendicular to the MUP itself.

    The motorist "breakthrus" are quite obvious as they rip the chainlink from it's mountings and bend it in the direction in which they have gone through. In a couple of cases this caused a somewhat dangerous condition as the chainlink was then a "flap" out into the path of cyclists on the MUP. One morning I was quite surprised to see a section newly torn out near a light controlled intersection... it was pretty obvious that someone failed to make the turn and went onto the MUP vice the nearby freeway ramp... made me wonder just how out of control some motorists must be at times to do this sort of damage.
    I face this same risk for part of my morning commute.

    I ride across the Dumbarton Bridge from Fremont CA to Menlo Park. The road that leads to the path on the bridge is the old retired highway 84. It is seperated from the new highway by about 6 feet and a chain link fence.

    The road is not well traveled by cars or trucks, so I ride just to the right of the center line. I cannot count how many times the fence has been breached by cars running off the highway. Last winter, there were three crashes in one week.

    Jeff, still fat

  13. #13
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fat biker
    I face this same risk for part of my morning commute.

    I ride across the Dumbarton Bridge from Fremont CA to Menlo Park. The road that leads to the path on the bridge is the old retired highway 84. It is seperated from the new highway by about 6 feet and a chain link fence.

    The road is not well traveled by cars or trucks, so I ride just to the right of the center line. I cannot count how many times the fence has been breached by cars running off the highway. Last winter, there were three crashes in one week.

    Jeff, still fat
    Yeah, I can't help but wonder what these motorists are doing that causes them to leave the roadway, cross about 12 feet of shoulder, jump a curb, cross about 15 feet of landscaped embankment, then go through a chainlink fence.

    And this is not near any hair pin curves or any such thing... I just don't get it.

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