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  1. #1
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    Interesting safety advice in new bike manual

    Just got a Windsor track bike and it came with a generic bicycle manual that didn't even attribute it to a writer or publisher.

    In the bicycle safety section it said "ride as close to the right side curb as possible, but be careful not to hit your pedal on the curb". At least it didn't say ride against the flow of traffic.

    Perpetuation of out-moded ideas.
    Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

    1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
    1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
    1988 Ducati 750 F1

  2. #2
    Dominatrikes sbhikes's Avatar
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    Are you supposed to ride a track bike on the road?
    ~Diane
    Recumbents: Lightning Thunderbolt, '06 Catrike Pocket. Upright: Trek Mountain Bike.
    8.5 mile commute. I like bike lanes.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbhikes
    Are you supposed to ride a track bike on the road?
    Its a generic manual for all bicycles.
    Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

    1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
    1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
    1988 Ducati 750 F1

  4. #4
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by San Rensho
    Its a generic manual for all bicycles.
    Yup perpetuation of out moded ideas... coupled with parents that pass on info such as ride against traffic... and stay out of the streets.

    Is it any wonder that there are so many "confused cyclists" out there?

    Why can't schools teach traffic cycling, as well as driver's ed?

  5. #5
    Al noisebeam's Avatar
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    How 'bout some 3' curb feelers on those pedals.

  6. #6
    Tom (ex)Builder twahl's Avatar
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    I like the curb feeler idea, but I think they'd be better placed on the front fork. Although, on the pedals, they'd be great defense against chasing yappy-dogs.

    Whack! Whack! Whack!
    Tom

    "It hurts so good..."

  7. #7
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noisebeam
    How 'bout some 3' curb feelers on those pedals.
    Training wheels would work better.

  8. #8
    Non-Custom Member zeytoun's Avatar
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    Why can't schools teach traffic cycling, as well as driver's ed?
    I was actually pretty fortunate, in that when I was in elementary school (San Diego in the late 1980's) they gave several lectures on proper bicycle safety. Included in the program was the rule not to ride on sidewalks. We even had a couple local policeman that assisted in reinforcing this for a couple weeks by waiting outside the school and "ticketing" kids who rode their bikes on the sidewalk and having them either ride in the street, or walk it on the sidewalk (as I recall, the tickets were non-binding warnings just to give the kids something tangible). The result being that I grew up with the notion that bikes were not for sidewalks.

    Perpetuation of out-moded ideas.
    Here's another one. Does this irk anyone else?
    I was reading the instructions on a new blinkie, and found a section that said: "Bicycling is an inherently dangerous activity. Always wear a helmet."

    Now, I have no problem with them promoting helmet-usage per se, but I take umbrage at the line calling it inherently dangerous. You don't see this warning when you buy car accessories. In fact, most other warnings (on things like power tools, electrical devices) are cautioning you about specific behaviors. Frankly, if I believed cycling were more dangerous to my life and well-being then driving, I wouldn't be cycling, helmeted or not.
    I am a mutated sig Virus. Please put me in your sig so that I can continue to replicate and mutate, blah!.

  9. #9
    Yabba-Dabba-Doo! AlmostTrick's Avatar
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    I've seen bikes with stickers on them that said "DO NOT RIDE AT NIGHT".

    I think it's just the manufactures way to try to cover their butt if someone gets hurt.
    Have Bike, Will Travel

  10. #10
    Banned. Helmet Head's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by San Rensho
    Just got a Windsor track bike and it came with a generic bicycle manual that didn't even attribute it to a writer or publisher.

    In the bicycle safety section it said "ride as close to the right side curb as possible, but be careful not to hit your pedal on the curb". At least it didn't say ride against the flow of traffic.

    Perpetuation of out-moded ideas.
    The full-blown implied version of this outmoded idea is still widely prevalent:
    If you ride further left than "as close to the right side curb as possible", and you get hit, it's your own fault.
    If you do ride "as close to the right side curb as possible", and you get hit, it's too bad, but at least it's not your fault.
    I continue to believe that the widespread prevalence of this idea is the single biggest factor that prevents people from taking up bicycling as sport, recreation, or form of transportation. I mean, if you believe it's your responsibility to ride right next to the curb, and that you're essentially doing something wrong if that's not where you're riding... who wants to do that?

    It's ironic that the bike industry itself is one of the biggest perpetuators of this idea, perhaps dictated by wrongheaded legal liability concerns, and dovetails with their strong "BikesBelong" support for get-bikes-out-of-the-way facilities, which further perpetuates the prevalence of this idea.

  11. #11
    Senior Member hotbike's Avatar
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    In the bicycle safety section it said "ride as close to the right side curb as possible, but be careful not to hit your pedal on the curb".

    Sounds like perfectly good advice to me, considering that many people who buy new bikes are novices.
    The manufacturer has to cover themselves. Actually, on second thought, that piece of advice encourages one to ride further to the left.

    I have seen some cyclists riding that close to the curb, but very slowly without breaking a sweat. The cyclists I'm refering to appear to be Hispanic. So I wonder if cycling is taught differently in different countries. Not all cyclists are trying to go a speedily as posible. In America bicycling is generally thought of as being faster than running; But on the other side of the coin , some cyclists choose to ride a bicycle because it's easier than walking.

    Is bicycling faster than running? Or easier than walking? Two sides of the same coin!

    One time I tried to grind my right pedal against a curb (to test my "Emergency Brakes") and the one-piece crank snapped at the threaded hole where the pedal screws in . It was a Royce-Union bicycle. I replaced the one-piece crank with a Schwinn one-piece crank. So when I read between the lines, the manufacturer (Windsor) is covering themselves in the event of a defective casting.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotbike
    Sounds like perfectly good advice to me, considering that many people who buy new bikes are novices.
    The manufacturer has to cover themselves. Actually, on second thought, that piece of advice encourages one to ride further to the left.
    Why not say "Refer to your state's laws regarding bicycling on the roadways before venturing out on your bicycle?" The current cycling advice does about as much good as the white front reflector for a cyclist riding at night (not completely useless but far from a best practice).

  13. #13
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    My Breezer came with a copy of Bicycling Street Smarts by John Allen. Very helpful to me as I am just starting to commute.
    Rob
    Commuting from South Jersey to Center City Philly
    Breezer Villager
    1980 Fuji Royale SS conversion

  14. #14
    Fritz M richardmasoner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeytoun
    Now, I have no problem with them promoting helmet-usage per se, but I take umbrage at the line calling it inherently dangerous.
    Yeah, that bit of CYA is something I lobby against, too. Without much effect, but oh well.

    Don Quixote

  15. #15
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by richardmasoner
    Yeah, that bit of CYA is something I lobby against, too. Without much effect, but oh well.

    Don Quixote
    In a litigious society, it is hard not to want to CYA.

  16. #16
    your nightmare gal chipcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by golftdi
    My Breezer came with a copy of Bicycling Street Smarts by John Allen. Very helpful to me as I am just starting to commute.
    Gotta give Breezer credit for going the extra mile. IMO, the manuals that come with most bicycles are just one step above worthless.
    "Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey

  17. #17
    Banned. Helmet Head's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipcom
    Gotta give Breezer credit for going the extra mile. IMO, the manuals that come with most bicycles are just one step above worthless.
    Actually, they are less than worthless. The stupid advice constitutes a negative value (one is better off not encountering it at all).

  18. #18
    Senior Member randya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlmostTrick
    I've seen bikes with stickers on them that said "DO NOT RIDE AT NIGHT".
    One of those stickers was on the last 20" bike I built up for ZooBombing. I left it there and put my ZooBomb sticker right under it. That particular bike hardly ever gets ridden anywhere in daylight, or sober.


  19. #19
    Senior Member John C. Ratliff's Avatar
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    In light of what's been posted here, I thought everyone would like to see what Trek put into their bicycle manual for my wife's bike, which was a hybrid. This comes from their 45 page manual, titled Road Bicycle Owner's Manual, TREK USA.

    page 11-12, Chapter One, RIDE SAFELY

    Wear a helmet.


    Trek urges all bicycle riders to wear helmets. An unprotected head is highly susceptible to injury, even from the slightest contact. There are many new helmets on the market with are both lightweight and comfortable. Trek recommends buying a helmet that is comfortable, fits properly, and meets ANSI and Snell safety testing standards (Fig. 21).

    Know your local bicycle riding laws

    Most state and local areas have specific laws for cyclists. Local cycling clubs or your state's Department of Transportation should be able to supply this information to you. A few of the more important rules of riding are:

    --Use the proper hand signals.
    --Ride on the correct side of the road (never go against traffic).
    --Ride single file when riding with other cyclists.
    --Ride defensively (expect the unexpected). Remember: You are hard to see, and although cycling is becoming more and more common, many drivers simply are not trained to recognize the rights and special considerations ofa bicycle rider.

    Avoid off-road riding.

    Your Trek bitycle is not designed for off-road riding. This bicycle is designed solely for riding on paved roads or bicycle paths. Do not attempt to ride this bicycle on dirt or rock paths.

    Use your brakes carefully

    Always keep a safe stopping distance between you and other vehicles or objects. When braking, apply both brakes at the same time. However, avoid using too much pressure on your front brake as it may cause your rear wheel to lift off the ground or your front wheel to slip out from under you. Adjust stopping distances and braking forces to suit riding conditions.

    Ride defensively.

    Always be on the lookout for hazardous situations. Remember that you are not as visible as a car to other bicyclists, motorists, or pedestrians. Be prepared to stop or take evasive action at all times.

    Watch the road

    Road conditions and designs have improved over the years, but you should always be aware of potential problems. Watch for potholes, drain grates, soft or low shoulders, and other deviations. When crossing railroad tracks, do so carefully at a 90 degree angle (Fig. 22--which shows the bicycle crossing RR tracks at 90 degrees, and a 45 degree arrow with a circle and oblique line saying "Don't"). If you are not sure of condition, walk your bike.

    Watch the parked cars you are preparing to pass.

    If a car you are passing suddenly enters your lane or someone opens a door unexpectedly, you could be involved in a serious accident. We advise you to mount a horn or bell on your bicycle for added security in defensive riding.

    Be careful when riding at night

    Your Trek is equipped with a full set of reflectors; keep them clean and in position, As useful as these reflectors are, remember that they do not help you see, nordo they help you be seen unless light is directed on them. Most local riding laws require a headlight and a tail light if you or going to ride at night. Obey those laws. We also recommend that you wear light and bright colored clothing, especially at night, to make yourself more visible. The important thing isto see and be seen. A number of products will help you achieve this. If you do any amount of night riding, visit your Trek dealer to see what's available.

    Be careful when riding in wet conditions

    No brakes, whatever their design, work as effectively in wet weather as they do in dry. Wet weather precautions therefore must be taken. BRakes, even when properly aligned, lubricated, an maintained, require greater lever pressure and longer stopping distances in wet weather. Anticipate the extra time it will take to stop. Also, remember that wet weather causes reduced visibility (bothfor you and for motorists) and reduced traction. Use slower cornering when traction is reduced. Wet leaves and manhole covers are other wet weather hazards.
    Trek also went through bicycle fit, maintenance, pedaling systems, and a lot of other things in detail in this manual.

    John
    John Ratliff

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