Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-19-07, 09:46 PM   #1
damnable
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Aus
Bikes:
Posts: 639
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Dealing with honkers

So, I read here quite often and try to take safety advice so I am hoping you can help me out with this.

I mostly ride around the local neighbourhood it's nothing too exertive and I don't push myself that hard. However, I have had a few honks at me lately. Because it's mostly suburban and I know the area there is in most cases a safe place to overtake not far ahead (within a matter of seconds), if I know there isn't, I'll pull into a side street or something similar. Because these safe overtaking zones are so common, and there is little traffic, there is never more than one of two cars behind me.

Now, how to react to these honkers? I have to admit, that my first knee jerk reaction is to simply yell out 'F... you' which I have done a couple of times, other times I have just held it in...just and stayed silent. Now I admit, abusing them isn't that best way to make them patient and considerate but is there anything else I can do, or is it generally best just to keep quiet and keep pace to avoid the risk of road rage?

Any suggestions?

Note - Yes, I have read through this forum so can you please keep acerbic comments to a minimum as I am genuinly asking for advice. Constructive critisism however will be thankfully taken.
damnable is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-07, 09:56 PM   #2
billwatson58
Planet Saver
 
billwatson58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Near western burb of Chicago
Bikes: Cannondale CAAD-10, Novara Randonee, Raleigh Super Grand Prix, Schwinn Mirada Sport winter beater
Posts: 289
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Wave at them - make them think that you believe they are honking at you to say hello and not to say get out of my way. Take as much space in the lane that you feel you need to be safe, or enough room to move right if need be. If it's clear ahead, wave them around you. If the mood strikes you, blow them kisses.
billwatson58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-07, 10:15 PM   #3
AdamJaz
Internet Junkie
 
AdamJaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Bikes: Trek Madone 2007 5.2SL
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
billwatson58,

I love that...
AdamJaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 05:06 AM   #4
Dahon.Steve
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New Jersey
Bikes:
Posts: 6,992
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by damnable View Post
Now, how to react to these honkers? I have to admit, that my first knee jerk reaction is to simply yell out 'F... you' which I have done a couple of times, other times I have just held it in...just and stayed silent.

Here's what to do.

The cyclist doesn't know the chaos he's creating behind him. Effective cycling states to maintain position no matter what for it's up the motorist to make a safe pass. However this often leads to honks and road rage. Here's my solution.

You need to buy a Take A Look Mirror. With this mirror, you'll be able to see the traffic behind you for about 1 1/2 blocks easily and this will give you maybe 10 or 15 seconds to determine how to handle the upcoming situation. Once the cars reach me, I'll hug the curb or sometimes pull to a side. If there's parked cars on the side, I'll rush to a spot where there aren't any vehicles and ride slowly in that location until the traffic passes me. In a few times, I'll get on the sidewalk for a brief moment until the cars pass.

I can often see where there are going to be problems and find solutions ahead of time that will enable traffic to flow ahead of me. But I can only do this with a mirror.

The only way I can determine how much traffic has accumulated behind is to buy this mirror. I found using the tehnique above eliminates the majority of those dreaded honks and it enables me to ride for miles, taking the lane with impunity since I can clearly see what's behind me at all times.

Once you buy this mirror, you'll exactly the problems you're creating for the motorist. Other on the forum will say who cares what the motorist thinks, it's his problem to make a safe pass. However, if you want to avoid those dreaded honks, you'll use my technique.
Dahon.Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 06:22 AM   #5
Schwinnrider
Mirror slap survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sunny Florida
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Surly Pacer, Access MTB, Ibex Corrida, one day a Simple City
Posts: 1,297
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
Here's what to do.

The cyclist doesn't know the chaos he's creating behind him. Effective cycling states to maintain position no matter what for it's up the motorist to make a safe pass. However this often leads to honks and road rage. Here's my solution.

You need to buy a Take A Look Mirror. With this mirror, you'll be able to see the traffic behind you for about 1 1/2 blocks easily and this will give you maybe 10 or 15 seconds to determine how to handle the upcoming situation. Once the cars reach me, I'll hug the curb or sometimes pull to a side. If there's parked cars on the side, I'll rush to a spot where there aren't any vehicles and ride slowly in that location until the traffic passes me. In a few times, I'll get on the sidewalk for a brief moment until the cars pass.

I can often see where there are going to be problems and find solutions ahead of time that will enable traffic to flow ahead of me. But I can only do this with a mirror.

The only way I can determine how much traffic has accumulated behind is to buy this mirror. I found using the tehnique above eliminates the majority of those dreaded honks and it enables me to ride for miles, taking the lane with impunity since I can clearly see what's behind me at all times.

Once you buy this mirror, you'll exactly the problems you're creating for the motorist. Other on the forum will say who cares what the motorist thinks, it's his problem to make a safe pass. However, if you want to avoid those dreaded honks, you'll use my technique.

I understand where you're coming from, but what you're saying is that you risk your own safety by encouraging motorists to pass you illegally and unsafely. As someone who was hit in the head by the mirror of a truck who "squeezed past me", I think you're asking for trouble.
Schwinnrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 06:49 AM   #6
Dahon.Steve
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: New Jersey
Bikes:
Posts: 6,992
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwinnrider View Post
I understand where you're coming from, but what you're saying is that you risk your own safety by encouraging motorists to pass you illegally and unsafely. As someone who was hit in the head by the mirror of a truck who "squeezed past me", I think you're asking for trouble.
It sounds more complicated then in real life I agree. However, if you control the situation, then allowing the car to lane split with you doesn't have to be unsafe. The motorist how hit you in the head was invisible for the most part because you did not know his position. If you were using a mirror, you might have avoided his mirror by moving over.

I found that you really can't control the agressive driving out there but prepare for situations by knowing where you stand in relation to the traffic behind that your slowing down.
Dahon.Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 06:51 AM   #7
piper_chuck
Senior Member
 
piper_chuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Columbia, SC
Bikes:
Posts: 562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
While mirrors and rushing to a spot where you can slow down, or stop, to let cars pass might help, in many cases it's not practical.

First, in an area with high odds for intersecting traffic (from roads, driveways, etc), the last thing I'd want to be doing is spending lots of time watching behind me so I could go out of my way to not inconvenience the almighty cager. In a place where someone is likely to pull out in front of me, I'm going to be watching ahead for those risks, not behind for someone who may have to slow down for a few seconds before it's safe to pass me.

The other issue I see with a mirror is that while it does let you know who is back there, it doesn't tell the drivers that you know they are back there. If you want to go out of your way (by slowing down, pulling on to the side walk, etc) to let the cars pass, that's your choice. Teaching the cagers that the cyclist will go out of their way to spare the cager a few precious seconds is likely to cause them to expect it from everyone. Those of us who want to maintain some semblance of a steady pace are going to maintain speed and course until there is a place where the cars can safely pass. If the area in question was a high traffic area, where the number of cars backed up could be high, this may not be the best approach, but the OP wasn't talking about high traffic areas.

I've found that the honkers fall into a few categories. One category includes the aggressive driver who feels he needs to assert his superiority by using his horn to express his displeasure at being inconvenienced and kids who want to be annoying usually lay on the horn. The other category is the "little old lady", who may not be little, old, or even a lady, but drives in the stereotypical manner, who out of ignorance who gives a short toot on the horn because she doesn't realize that nearly all cyclists can hear that there's a car behind them.

Unless you want to spend all your time worrying about what's behind you, risking missing something happening in front of you, and going out of your way to be out of the way when the car approaches you, there isn't much you can do to prevent the occasional toot on the horn. The simplest way to deal with them is to just ignore the horn and follow your plan of making room for them to pass when the road conditions allow it.

And in closing, here's an interesting thing that happened to me this week. I was back in my neighborhood at the end of a ride. There are only about 15 finished houses, on several acre lots, so the traffic volume is pretty low. I was in the middle of the road taking a quick pull from my water bottle before climbing the last winding hill. I heard a car approaching from behind and wouldn't you know it, they beeped before I could make room. After I moved over, the driver sped past in their SUV. Note the speed limit is 25 and the road goes slightly downhill and I was cruising at about 20 or so, so I wasn't exactly slowing them down any great amount. Anyway, it was raining Friday morning as I was leaving for work. As I started down the winding hill I saw a fire truck and highway patrol car at the side of the road part way down. Off the road, with the front end wrapped around a tree, was the SUV that had beeped me earlier in the week. I couldn't help but think that the aggressive tendencies the person had shown earlier in the week might have lead to this accident.
piper_chuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 07:18 AM   #8
-=(8)=-
♋ ☮♂ ☭ ☯
 
-=(8)=-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: 40205 'ViLLeBiLLie
Bikes: Sngl Spd's, 70's- 80's vintage, D-tube Folder
Posts: 7,903
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree with Dahon Steve.
Mirror.
Situational awareness.
Tuff skin.

When you get used to a mirror (takes a little while) you can
see the oldie in a Buick, angry redneck in a bigfoot truck or
lane veering BMW a block before they get to you.
I give them room to get by so if they cant it becomes a 'them' problem.
If they want to honk after that, so what. Let it go. There is always going
to be someone who is going to yell or honk. Look at it on the brite side.....
After they honk and go by you will be done with them. They however, will
still be a mean spirited, angry and inpatient individual.
__________________
-ADVOCACY-☜ Radical VC = Car people on bikes. Just say "NO"
-=(8)=- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 07:21 AM   #9
maddyfish
Senior Member
 
maddyfish's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ky. and FL.
Bikes: KHS steel SS
Posts: 3,944
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I give a nice big happy wave.
1. It might be somebody I know.
2. If it is an unhappy honker, waving seems to really bother and confuse them.
maddyfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 07:48 AM   #10
bigdufstuff
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Vancouver
Bikes:
Posts: 185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I also wave to honkers.

If you curse them they seem to be satisfied that they pissed of a cyclist. I don't want to give them that satisfaction. If you wave, you'll be sending a peaceful sign and be happy that you're confident enough to handle your rights to the road.
bigdufstuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 08:20 AM   #11
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2
Posts: 25,422
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2275 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
Anyway, it was raining Friday morning as I was leaving for work. As I started down the winding hill I saw a fire truck and highway patrol car at the side of the road part way down. Off the road, with the front end wrapped around a tree, was the SUV that had beeped me earlier in the week. I couldn't help but think that the aggressive tendencies the person had shown earlier in the week might have lead to this accident.
Ahhhhh "instant kara," so rare, so beautiful. I hope you savored the moment.
genec is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 09:19 AM   #12
SSP
Software for Cyclists
 
SSP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Redding, California
Bikes: Trek 5200, Specialized MTB
Posts: 4,618
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
+1 on the mirror.


As to getting honked at...if it's an aggressive "get off the road" kind of honk, I typically respond with a friendly wave of my middle finger.
SSP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 09:34 AM   #13
daredevil
cyclepath
 
daredevil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: "The Last Best Place"
Bikes: 2005 Trek Pilot 5.0, 2001 Specialized Sirrus Pro, Kona Lava Dome, Raleigh hardtail converted to commuter, 87 Takara steel road bike, 2008 Trek Soho
Posts: 3,550
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sometimes I'll motion for them to come back to me so we can discuss it.

Not always a good idea, I know.
__________________
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Without music, life would be a mistake."
-- Friedrich Nietzsche
daredevil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 09:43 AM   #14
Tom Stormcrowe
Out fishing with Annie on his lap, a cigar in one hand and a ginger ale in the other, watching the sunset.
 
Tom Stormcrowe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: South Florida
Bikes: Techna Wheelchair and a Sun EZ 3 Recumbent Trike
Posts: 16,128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by maddyfish View Post
I give a nice big happy wave.
1. It might be somebody I know.
2. If it is an unhappy honker, waving seems to really bother and confuse them.
Agreed, and often the next honking from them is a quick toot and wave later on every time they pass in either direction. Friendliness is disarming
__________________
. “He who fights with monsters might take care lest he thereby become a monster. And if you gaze for long into an abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.”- Fredrick Nietzsche

"We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." - Immanuel Kant
Tom Stormcrowe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 10:44 AM   #15
bac
Senior Member
 
bac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Pennsylvania
Bikes: Too many to list!
Posts: 7,481
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by damnable View Post
Any suggestions?
For anything short of running me down, I just ignore them. I don't even hear the honks anymore. Focus on your ride and your fun. Don't let these jealous fools ruin your day!

... Brad
bac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 10:46 AM   #16
Schwinnrider
Mirror slap survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sunny Florida
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Surly Pacer, Access MTB, Ibex Corrida, one day a Simple City
Posts: 1,297
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dahon.Steve View Post
It sounds more complicated then in real life I agree. However, if you control the situation, then allowing the car to lane split with you doesn't have to be unsafe. The motorist how hit you in the head was invisible for the most part because you did not know his position. If you were using a mirror, you might have avoided his mirror by moving over.

I found that you really can't control the agressive driving out there but prepare for situations by knowing where you stand in relation to the traffic behind that your slowing down.

Nope. I couldn't have avoided his mirror because I was already hugging the white line. The reason I got hit is because I wasn't taking enough lane---in an attempt to be nice to motorists and not hold them up, which is pretty much what you recommend. If I had been 2 feet over into the lane nobody could have passed and I wouldn't have been hit. And I always use a mirror. I appreciate that you think what you're doing is proper technique, but it's unsafe and unwise. Cyclists are responsible for their own safety, and the best way to do that is to control the section of lane they're in. One does that by taking enough real estate to control who passes and when. Hugging the white line to allow cars to pass illegally(my state has a 3 foot passing rule) is dangerous.

Last edited by Schwinnrider; 10-21-07 at 05:48 AM. Reason: Forgot pertinent information
Schwinnrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 10:56 AM   #17
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2
Posts: 25,422
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2275 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe View Post
Agreed, and often the next honking from them is a quick toot and wave later on every time they pass in either direction. Friendliness is disarming
I try to do that too... and I believe a huge smile is part of the disarming bit... but darn it, sometimes the finger just comes out first.... Especially when the honk is accompanied by very aggressive driving.
genec is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 12:49 PM   #18
AlmostTrick
Yabba-Dabba-Doo!
 
AlmostTrick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Bedrock, IL
Bikes: 1968 Schwinn Orange Krate, 5 speed stick shift
Posts: 5,388
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 335 Post(s)
I get honked at about once every other ride. Once I went about two weeks without any and was quite surprised. The thing I've noticed is that most honkers don't usually do anything that puts me at risk. If they honk from behind me, I'll usually look back and/or wave, especially if I'm going to be blocking them for a while. This way they realize that I know they are there, but I'm not moving until it's safe to do so.

Most of the honks I receive come from drivers who are in the process of passing me (again, almost always safely) or already past me. Often times I didn't even hold them up in any way. They are just telling me a bicycle shouldn't be in the "car" lane. For these people I give no response. Why would I? They are already past me.

Last week I had a tractor trailer dump truck give me the longest honk ever. At least 20 seconds while I was taking the lane around a blind curve on a narrow road. Those air horns are freakin' loud! I'm pretty sure this guy was ready to pop a vein, but I held my ground. Normally I hammer through this section to be polite, but this time I couldn't resist slowing down a little while shaking my head. A dump driver going the opposite direction was even looking at this driver like he was crazy. Once I was able to let him pass he went nice and wide and honked again. I waved.

Quote:
Originally Posted by piperchuck
Teaching the cagers that the cyclist will go out of their way to spare the cager a few precious seconds is likely to cause them to expect it from everyone.
+1. Doing this only reinforces the belief that the roads were made for the almighty car and bicycles don't really belong there. This belief is why many honk. Be ok with the fact that sometimes you will hold up motorists and sometimes they will honk or yell at you. Usually that's as far as it goes.

Last edited by AlmostTrick; 10-20-07 at 10:48 PM.
AlmostTrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 12:58 PM   #19
adamtki
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Bikes: Soma cyclocross with Bionx PL500HS
Posts: 635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
While mirrors and rushing to a spot where you can slow down, or stop, to let cars pass might help, in many cases it's not practical.

First, in an area with high odds for intersecting traffic (from roads, driveways, etc), the last thing I'd want to be doing is spending lots of time watching behind me so I could go out of my way to not inconvenience the almighty cager. In a place where someone is likely to pull out in front of me, I'm going to be watching ahead for those risks, not behind for someone who may have to slow down for a few seconds before it's safe to pass me.
People who use mirrors don't spend "lots of time watching behind" them when they need to be looking ahead of them. We use our mirrors just like driver would. Mirrors are as important in biking as they are in driving if not more.

Quote:
Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
The other issue I see with a mirror is that while it does let you know who is back there, it doesn't tell the drivers that you know they are back there. ...
It's better than both of you not knowing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by piper_chuck View Post
Unless you want to spend all your time worrying about what's behind you, risking missing something happening in front of you, and going out of your way to be out of the way when the car approaches you, there isn't much you can do to prevent the occasional toot on the horn. The simplest way to deal with them is to just ignore the horn and follow your plan of making room for them to pass when the road conditions allow it.
You don't need to be looking in the mirror every second to know what's behind you. I feel more comfortable knowing what's passing me and how close. If there are cars passing me and they look like they're not hugging the right, I stay about two feet from the road. If there are trucks and busses passing me, I know to stay closer to the curb.

You have to remember, you're a slow moving vehicle on the road. You need to know when to pullover and let the faster vehicles by. But at the same time, you have to let everyone else know that you belong on the road as much as they do. Having a mirror helps with that.

Since I've been using a mirror, I rarely get honks and I've never been surprised by something that passed too close.

Last edited by adamtki; 10-20-07 at 01:04 PM.
adamtki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 02:19 PM   #20
donnamb 
tired
 
donnamb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Bikes: Breezer Uptown 8, U frame
Posts: 5,653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by damnable View Post
Now, how to react to these honkers?
I have one of those Airzounds air horns. I honk right back. They're not expecting that and they tend to try to get away from me very quickly.
__________________
"Real wars of words are harder to win. They require thought, insight, precision, articulation, knowledge, and experience. They require the humility to admit when you are wrong. They recognize that the dialectic is not about making us look at you, but about us all looking together for the truth."
donnamb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 06:03 PM   #21
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 17,909
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 322 Post(s)
The only place I get honked somewhat regularly is on Pacific Coast Highway 101 through downtown Encinitas, where I take the center of the right lane because the speed limit is only 30mph / 50kph and because it is narrow and bounded by parked cars, diagonal in some blocks, parallel in others. I like the idea of giving a friendly wave back, which is a much more mature response than my usual instinct.

As a recent convert to mirrors (CycleAware helmet mount), I concur that they are somewhat useful.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324
Capo: 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 06:25 PM   #22
Machka 
In Real Life
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Down under down under
Bikes: Lots
Posts: 48,160
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1191 Post(s)
It baffles me why anyone would want to react negatively to honkers.

When someone honks at me, I smile and wave. It's easy ... friendly little smile on your face and friendly little wave. It lets the driver know that you are having a GREAT day, and that the driver can't spoil that. In fact, it suggests that you might be having a better day than the driver, and if the driver also rode his/her bicycle, he/she might also have a great day.

I've been using this technique for quite a few years. Some drivers just drive away shaking their heads ... others, my favorites, slowly and hesitantly return my smile and wave.
Machka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 07:01 PM   #23
Lamplight
Senior Member
 
Lamplight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Bellingham, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,772
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I just ignore them. When you've been honked (and yelled) at from traffic on the opposite side of the road, you realize that nothing you say or do will make them any less angry or ignorant. I always just continue on my way as if nothing happened, content in knowing that the person is probably miserable, living life with so much impatience and aggression.
Lamplight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 08:31 PM   #24
urban_assault
53 miles per burrito
 
urban_assault's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Ft Worth, TX
Bikes: Land Shark, Trek 1000, Iron Horse Rogue, Novara Randonee
Posts: 1,487
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I ignore them, wave, or blow the driver a kiss.
urban_assault is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-07, 11:50 PM   #25
Carusoswi
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 1,184
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There are honks, and then, there are honks.

Someone who gives a couple of short beeps is only being prudent. Someone who lays on their horn expects you to vaporize. There is a difference.

The short beepers always get a friendly acknowledgment from me. My reaction to the second group varies depending upon my mood. I won't disagree that a friendly wave is probably the best reaction in almost all of these situations, but, I am human, too. Challenge my right to be on the road, and I may just challenge you back.

Caruso
Carusoswi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:51 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION