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Old 03-31-04, 07:51 PM   #1
dirtbikedude
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No longer an argument

According to an article put out by IMBA, anti-cyclist will now have to find a different excuse to keep us off the trails. According to studies done, cycling affects natural resources no more then hiking. I guess now the anti-cycling crowd will have use the argument of user conflict and that will depend on demographics.

The article is below;

"New Science Review Indicates that Mountain Biking Impacts Resources No More than Hiking
For Immediate Release
03-31-04
Contact: Pete Webber, IMBA communications director
pete@imba.com
303-545-9011


IMBA has released a comprehensive review of scientific studies that examine the impacts of mountain biking on trails, vegetation, and wildlife. The collection of scientific studies indicate that mountain biking is no more damaging than other forms of recreation, including hiking.

IMBA's review, titled "Natural Resource Impacts of Mountain Biking," looks at all the available studies that have measured the impacts of bicycling and other trail use. "Like all forms of recreation, bicycling does affect natural resources," said Gary Sprung, IMBA's senior national policy advisor and author of the document. "But since the birth of mountain biking, environmentalists and hikers have maintained that cycling causes more damage to trails, vegetation, and wildlife than hiking. The science performed to date does not support that notion. The more challenging issue for trail users is not their differing environmental impacts, but rather their social conflicts, which are quite real, thoroughly studied, and manageable."

Eight empirical studies are summarized in the report, which does not evaluate sociology studies.

The review is available on IMBA's website at http://www.imba.com/resources/science."
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Old 03-31-04, 09:17 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by dirtbikedude
According to an article put out by IMBA, anti-cyclist will now have to find a different excuse to keep us off the trails. According to studies done, cycling affects natural resources no more then hiking. I guess now the anti-cycling crowd will have use the argument of user conflict and that will depend on demographics.
They already have -- it's the old "a cyclist ran over me while I was walking down the trail"
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Old 04-01-04, 03:46 PM   #3
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I think it will be funny to see what kind of BS the elite equestrian and hiker population comes up with next to keep us off of their trails
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Old 04-01-04, 05:10 PM   #4
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Playing devils advocate here (I do believe the study is right) but don't you think the report might be biased seeing it was done by IMBA
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Old 04-02-04, 07:43 PM   #5
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Playing devils advocate here (I do believe the study is right) but don't you think the report might be biased seeing it was done by IMBA
Actually it was not IMBA that did the study. The studies were done by the groups below. IMBA just put them out there for all to see;

(1) Bjorkman, Alan, "Off Road Bicycle and Hiking Trail User Interactions: A Report to the Wisconsin Natural Resources Board," Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources: Bureau of Research, (1996)

(2) Chiu, Luke and Kriwoken, Lorne, "Managing Recreational Mountain Biking in Wellington Park, Tasmania, Australia," Annals of Leisure Research, (in press)

(3) Crockett, Christopher S., "Survey of Ecological Impact Considerations Related to Mountain Bicycle Use on the Edwards Field Trail at Joseph D. Grant County Park, 1986, Santa Clara County (CA) Parks Dept. (1986)

(4) Gander, Hans & Ingold, Paul, "Reactions of Male Alpine Chamois Rupicapra r.rupicapra to Hikers, Joggers and Mountainbikers," Biological Conservation, (1996), 79:107-109.

(5) Goeft, Ute and Alder, Jackie, "Sustainable Mountain Biking: A Case Study from the Southwest of Western Australia," Journal of Sustainable Tourism, (2001), 9(3):193-211.

(6) Herrero, Jake, and Stephen Herrero, "Management Options for the Moraine Lake Highline Trail: Grizzly Bears and Cyclists," (2000)

(7) Papouchis, Christopher M. & Singer, Francis J., & Sloan, William, "Responses of Desert Bighorn Sheep To Increased Human Recreation," Journal of Wildlife Management, (2001), 65(3):573-582.

(8) Spahr, Robin, "Factors Affecting The Distribution Of Bald Eagles And Effects Of Human Activity On Bald Eagles Wintering Along The Boise River, 1990," Boise State University, (1990)

(9) Taylor, Audrey R. and Knight, Richard L., "Wildlife Responses to Recreation and Associated Visitor Perceptions," Ecological Applications, (2003), 13(4):951-963

(10) Thurston, Eden and Reader, Richard J., "Impacts of Experimentally Applied Mountain Biking and Hiking on Vegetation and Soil of a Deciduous Forest," Environmental Management, (2001), 27(3):397-409.

(11) Weesner, Meg, in Cactus Forest Trail Environmental Assessment, Saguaro National Park, Arizona, National Park Service 2003

(12) Wilson, John P. and Seney, Joseph P., "Erosional Impacts of Hikers, Horses, Motorcycles and Off-Road Bicycles on Mountain Trails in Montana," Mountain Research and Development, (1994), 47(1):77-88.
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Old 04-02-04, 08:30 PM   #6
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What I hate is the mtn biker barreling down the trail pushing you aside as if a pedestrian/hiker has no rights.

These acts, not ecological damage, is what inspires most of the hatred/negativity against mtn bikers.

Personally, I have almost swatted one or two of them off of their bikes with a limb from a tree.

I hate when that is done to me, and many mtn bikers have no respect for others.

Of course, NO ONE on Bikeforums would ever do such a thing. But, then BF has only 6,000 members, and there are hundreds of thousands of mtn bikers.
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Old 04-02-04, 08:40 PM   #7
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At local/small trails I see no problem with allowing mountain biking (hell I do it myself) but larger/national park/long-distance trails such as the AT or many National Parks Trails I beleive it is a good thing that they are foot traffic only and I hope they stay that way. Many of these trails are already over travled, its not that mountain biking is worse it just adds that much more traffic. Also what about other things besides the trail itself. Parking at trailheads, congestion, etc.. would all have negative consequences if some of these trails are opened up for multi-use. But to be fair, I think some trails should be strictly cycling.

"Can't we all just get along"

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Old 04-03-04, 03:38 AM   #8
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At local/small trails I see no problem with allowing mountain biking (hell I do it myself) but larger/national park/long-distance trails such as the AT or many National Parks Trails I beleive it is a good thing that they are foot traffic only and I hope they stay that way. Many of these trails are already over travled, its not that mountain biking is worse it just adds that much more traffic. Also what about other things besides the trail itself. Parking at trailheads, congestion, etc.. would all have negative consequences if some of these trails are opened up for multi-use. But to be fair, I think some trails should be strictly cycling.

"Can't we all just get along"

Ray
Why not have some of both? I can see restricting mountain biking in Natl Parks and Wilderness areas but currently the stance seems to be a virtually complete ban.

I have been in the Canadian Natl Parks and they have no problem with mountain bike trails.

I think Mountain Biking will be important for the preservation of wildlife habitat. Most animals quickly adapt themselves to reasonably nonintrusive human activities. Also when people use an area for recreation whether hunting, fishing, hiking, camping or mountain biking, they have a vested interest in protecting wild areas and wanting more of them purchased and protected. In the long run, mountain bikers are a big asset.
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Old 04-03-04, 09:48 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by DnvrFox
What I hate is the mtn biker barreling down the trail pushing you aside as if a pedestrian/hiker has no rights.

These acts, not ecological damage, is what inspires most of the hatred/negativity against mtn bikers.

Personally, I have almost swatted one or two of them off of their bikes with a limb from a tree.

I hate when that is done to me, and many mtn bikers have no respect for others.

Of course, NO ONE on Bikeforums would ever do such a thing. But, then BF has only 6,000 members, and there are hundreds of thousands of mtn bikers.
The actions of a few ruin it for the whole. When ever I run across these clowns on a trail I just want to push them off.
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