Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-26-09, 06:02 PM   #1
damonwang
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 24
Legality of locking bicycles to signs and trees on the sidewalk?

Hello everyone,

Been lurking a while, this is my first post. Please let me know if I've got the wrong forum.

I live in a Chicago apartment building without enough bicycle rack for all the tenants bicycles. I see enough front wheels and sometimes even back wheels locked up without their frames that I wouldn't trust self-locking. So I lock to a tree growing out of the sidewalk.

Today my landlord has put up notices warning us that they plan to cut all the bicycles off railings, fences, street signs, trees, etc. I can believe that a man is within his rights to cut people's bicycles off his own stairs, but sign poles and trees on the sidewalk seem outside his property.

Does the forum have any advice for keeping my bicycle locked up? I'd prefer to keep my bicycle locked up rather than seek legal recourse after the fact.
damonwang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 06:08 PM   #2
DX-MAN
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 4,789
check the city's website, as well as the state's; there should be a link to find applicable law. Takes some searching, but is well worth it, since you'd have to pay a lawyer's time otherwise. Also, see if there's a link to e-mail someone in the mayor's office. They can at least point you in the right direction for a city office to provide information or help.
DX-MAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 06:53 PM   #3
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,052
For the fun of it, lock a beater to a streetsign(not his property), camp out with a camcorder. And call the cops about seeing it getting stolen...

Or seeing as how this is just a cranky landlord, I doubt he's got angle grinders set up, probably just going to use bolt cutters... Anyone know what locks will withstand bolt cutters? Use two.
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 06:58 PM   #4
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Bikes: 1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
Posts: 16,821
I thought Chicago is reputed to have a bicycle-friendly mayor. Contact city government and find out what your rights are. You might also ask the landlord to provide additional bike racks, on the grounds that greater parking capacity is clearly needed.

In San Diego we did have a downtown hotel which told bicyclists they could not lock up to signposts in the public right-of-way in front of their main entrance.
__________________
"Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 07:02 PM   #5
kingfish254 
Senior Member
 
kingfish254's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes: 1989 Dahon Stainless Classic III Folder - 1990 Dahon Mariner Classic III Folder - 2005 Dahon Jetstream P8 Full Suspension Folder
Posts: 1,000
You can get the Kyptonite lock for $65 from ebay. Bolt cutters cannot get this baby.

http://cgi.ebay.com/KRYPTONITE-3-3-N...3A1%7C294%3A50
__________________
May the Fold be with you

48 Rudge Whitworth Sports - 59 Schwinn Panther II - 68 26" Columbia Roadster - 79 Schwinn Spitfire 5
68 16" Graziella Tandem Folder - 73 Raleigh Twenty Folder - 89 16" Dahon Stainless Classic III Folder - 05 20" Dahon Jetstream P8 Full Suspension Folder - Dahon Mu XL Sport
- plus various bikes to flip
kingfish254 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 08:12 PM   #6
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 5,938
Quote:
Originally Posted by John E View Post
You might also ask the landlord to provide additional bike racks, on the grounds that greater parking capacity is clearly needed.
I'd start with that, especially if you can get together with other tenants who need space to park their bicycles. If there are enough of you it might even be reasonable to share in the cost of the racks with the landlord. It would be good to find out what the objection to the bikes is currently and why additional racks haven't already been installed given the evident need for them.

The Illinois code has the following section:
"(625 ILCS 5/11‑1513) (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 11‑1513)
Sec. 11‑1513. Bicycle parking. (a) A person may park a bicycle on a sidewalk unless prohibited or restricted by an official traffic‑control device.
(b) A bicycle parked on a sidewalk shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of pedestrian or other traffic.
(c) A bicycle may be parked on the roadway at any angle to the curb or edge of the roadway at any location where parking is allowed.
(d) A bicycle may be parked on the roadway abreast of another bicycle or bicycles near the side of the roadway at any location where parking is allowed.
(e) A person shall not park a bicycle on a roadway in such a manner as to obstruct the movement of a legally parked motor vehicle.
(f) In all other respects, bicycles parked anywhere on a highway shall conform with the provisions of this Code regulating the parking of vehicles. "

Don't know what Chicago municipal ordinances there might be concerning bike parking.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-09, 11:14 PM   #7
damonwang
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
I'd start with that, especially if you can get
together with other tenants who need space to park their bicycles. If
there are enough of you it might even be reasonable to share in the cost
of the racks with the landlord. It would be good to find out what the
objection to the bikes is currently and why additional racks haven't
already been installed given the evident need for them.
As I understand it, two companies run all the apartments in this
neighborhood: the one has a near monopoly and therefore gets away with
ramshackle buildings, desultory maintenance, and accidentally evicting
the wrong people because of bureaucratic mishaps; the other gets away
with being almost as bad because the alternative is in fact worse. I'm
signed on with the better one. Like my neighbors, I'm a poor college
student who expects to move away in one or two years. It's not a
situation which encourages people to sink money into capital
investments.

That doesn't mean I won't print out some posters tomorrow and knock on a
few of my neighbors' doors, but I'm not hopeful about this approach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
The Illinois code has the following section:
"(625 ILCS 5/11‑1513) (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 11‑1513)
Sec. 11‑1513. Bicycle parking. (a) A person may park a bicycle on a sidewalk unless prohibited or restricted by an official traffic‑control device.
(b) A bicycle parked on a sidewalk shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of pedestrian or other traffic.
(c) A bicycle may be parked on the roadway at any angle to the curb or edge of the roadway at any location where parking is allowed.
(d) A bicycle may be parked on the roadway abreast of another bicycle or bicycles near the side of the roadway at any location where parking is allowed.
(e) A person shall not park a bicycle on a roadway in such a manner as to obstruct the movement of a legally parked motor vehicle.
(f) In all other respects, bicycles parked anywhere on a highway shall conform with the provisions of this Code regulating the parking of vehicles. "

Don't know what Chicago municipal ordinances there might be concerning bike parking.
Retrieved from
http://www.chicagobikes.org/bikelaws/index.php?show=search&chapter=2&b=chi:

Quote:
9-52-070 Parking

No person shall park a bicycle upon a street other than upon the roadway
against the curb or upon the sidewalk against a rack, parking meter or
sign pole to support the bicycle or against a building or at the curb in
such manner as to afford the least obstruction to pedestrian traffic.

Added Coun. J. 7-12-90, p. 18634; Amend Coun. J. 7-21-04, p. 28659,
1
Both of these are going on the poster. Thank you for finding the first
and inspiring me to find the second.

As an alternative assuming I will neither be permitted to lock my bike
outside or be able to find space on the racks, could anyone with
construction experience advise me on constructing a makeshift bike rack?
I was thinking of screwing together PVC piping into a U-shape, filling
it with concrete, and then sinking the ends into two milk crates full of
concrete. I'm worried about leaving air spaces in the piping, since the
PVC shell will be easily cut, and whether the structure will be able to
support its own weight. I'd rather construct a stand of inferior quality
because, being a poor college student, I can't really afford to buy and
ship a commercial stand.
damonwang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 12:52 AM   #8
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by damonwang View Post
I was thinking of screwing together PVC piping into a U-shape, filling
it with concrete, and then sinking the ends into two milk crates full of
concrete. I'm worried about leaving air spaces in the piping, since the
PVC shell will be easily cut, and whether the structure will be able to
support its own weight. I'd rather construct a stand of inferior quality
because, being a poor college student, I can't really afford to buy and
ship a commercial stand.
That design sounds like it could easily be broken with a sledgehammer, cracks the concrete core, and then the pvc is just brittle on its own.

I think you're better off bringing the bike inside your apartment with you.
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 01:32 AM   #9
Shavit
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 142
OP, i think xenologer is correct. Homemade bike racks are fairly easy to break. Besides, you landlord may not want the eye sore.

But his second sentence would probably be a perfect solution. There are quite a few options for storing the bike indoors without taking up a lot of floor space.
Shavit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 03:47 AM   #10
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shavit View Post
There are quite a few options for storing the bike indoors without taking up a lot of floor space.
Considering your landlord has taken away your outdoor parking options, I think screwing a pair of bike hooks into the ceiling of your entryway is fair turnabout. (just spackle over the holes if you ever move)
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 09:07 AM   #11
The Human Car
-=Barry=-
 
The Human Car's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Baltimore, MD +/- ~100 miles
Bikes:
Posts: 4,077
I can't speak for Chicago but in Baltimore adjacent property owners have a say in what happens next to their property, to what extent I really don't know but I do know the city has to get permission before they install a bike rack at any location (we install ~200 bike racks a year.)

Anyway it would not hurt getting your local bicycle advocacy organization involved in this issue.
__________________
Cycling Advocate
http://BaltimoreSpokes.org
. . . o
. . /L
=()>()
The Human Car is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 09:17 AM   #12
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2
Posts: 24,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Human Car View Post
I can't speak for Chicago but in Baltimore adjacent property owners have a say in what happens next to their property, to what extent I really don't know but I do know the city has to get permission before they install a bike rack at any location (we install ~200 bike racks a year.)

Anyway it would not hurt getting your local bicycle advocacy organization involved in this issue.
I know here in San Diego there have been issues with just parking a bike "anywhere," one of the local larger hotels had bikes removed from signposts near their front entrance... much to the shock of the commuting cyclists. There were no bike racks nearby and bike racks downtown are rare. Lots of auto parking... at curbs and in structures and lots... but bikes... not so much.
genec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 10:41 AM   #13
nelson249
"Per Ardua ad Surly"
 
nelson249's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario
Bikes: Bianchi Specialissima, Mongoose Hilltopper ATB, Surly Cross-Check, Norco City Glide
Posts: 1,416
Quote:
Originally Posted by xenologer View Post
Considering your landlord has taken away your outdoor parking options, I think screwing a pair of bike hooks into the ceiling of your entryway is fair turnabout. (just spackle over the holes if you ever move)

+1

That is I would do. I used to keep my good road bike between my bed and the wall as there was no way I was going to leave it locked up outside anywhere.
nelson249 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 10:47 AM   #14
genec
genec
 
genec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: West Coast
Bikes: custom built, sannino, beachbike, giant trance x2
Posts: 24,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by nelson249 View Post
+1

That is I would do. I used to keep my good road bike between my bed and the wall as there was no way I was going to leave it locked up outside anywhere.
Same here.

At another different apartment I used to keep my bike and my wife's bike on the staircase from the front door to the upstairs apartment... we were the only ones that used the stairs so there were no issues with us. The hand rail held on to the drop bars perfectly.

Right now I have my favorite bike in the living room, and the others in the garage...

Seems like there has always been a bike in the house.
genec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 11:40 AM   #15
sggoodri
Senior Member
 
sggoodri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cary, NC
Bikes: 1983 Trek, 2001 Lemond, 2000 Gary Fisher
Posts: 3,073
I've always chosen ground level apartment (or close) to avoid lugging a bike up a lot of stairs.

Where that's not possible, I recommend working with the landlord to install bike parking in a reasonable location.

Here in Cary, NC, we have a new ordinance that required bike parking to be provided at new apartment developments and significantly redeveloped ones.
sggoodri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 09:54 PM   #16
damonwang
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 24
I live on the second floor, and because the landlord has forbidden us to carry bicycles up the front stairs I would have to bring my bicycle through a back alley and up the fire escape. It's a steel frame dating from the 80s when Ross Bicycles was still in business, probably 30lbs, and more than I want to manhandle up a fire escape. So I would prefer to store the bicycle outside. It's actually quite a pity, because there's a pantry right off the back door that would just fit my bicycle turned vertically and hung from one wheel, I think.

On the other hand, these signs have been up two days now and I haven't seen anybody's lock cut, so maybe this will blow over.
damonwang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 10:13 PM   #17
xenologer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 2,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by damonwang View Post
I live on the second floor, and because the landlord has forbidden us to carry bicycles up the front stairs I would have to bring my bicycle through a back alley and up the fire escape.
The guy's already being a d*ck about the street signs (which he probably has no jurisdiction over) so I'd just carry that bike right up the front door and tell him he can piss off, or let me lock it up outside as usual. Seriously, he won't let you take it in, won't let you park on the signposts, and doesn't provide a designated bike rack? He's being unreasonable and you can tell him so.


Quote:
Originally Posted by damonwang View Post
It's a steel frame dating from the 80s when Ross Bicycles was still in business, probably 30lbs, and more than I want to manhandle up a fire escape. So I would prefer to store the bicycle outside. It's actually quite a pity, because there's a pantry right off the back door that would just fit my bicycle turned vertically and hung from one wheel, I think.

On the other hand, these signs have been up two days now and I haven't seen anybody's lock cut, so maybe this will blow over.
See part 1 about avoiding the fire escape. Mines 40lbs and taking the stairs up 3 floors is no big deal, most cyclists could use the upper body workout.
xenologer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-09, 10:53 PM   #18
DX-MAN
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 4,789
Uh, damonwang? Is there something in your lease that says you can't take bikes up the stairs? His word alone, landlord or not, can't override that.
DX-MAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-09, 06:51 AM   #19
gcottay
Senior Member
 
gcottay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Green Valley AZ
Bikes: Trice Q; Volae Century; TT 3.4
Posts: 3,772
Your bike belongs indoors.
gcottay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:40 PM.