Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    I fear angry birds Santaria's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Recalculating
    My Bikes
    2013 Salsa Vaya
    Posts
    2,154
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Texas statute for using a bike lane to turn right?

    I'm trying to find the law for Texas where it says exactly how a car can use the bike lane to make right turns. I swore it was within 25 feet of an intersection, or something close to that.

    I checked the Texas DMV Drivers Handbook and it doesn't actually say anything.


    Anybody?
    THE DEVIL

    Originally Posted by Scrodzilla
    If that was my house and you put your stupid bike in my flower garden to take a picture, I would come outside in my underwear and light you on fire.

  2. #2
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR2, Bridgestone RB-T, Bike-E, Vision R-40, Novara Safari
    Posts
    2,982
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Texas law doesn't really say anything about bike lanes at all -- it acknowledges that parts of the road may be dedicated to bicycle use in a place or two, but doesn't further define or regulate such parts of the road.

    You'll need to look in your local ordinances to find what you're looking for (if it exists at all -- it doesn't seem to exist in the Austin ordinances, anyways. Instead, bike lanes typically disappear near intersections here, leading to the same end result.)

  3. #3
    Senior Member sggoodri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cary, NC
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek, 2001 Lemond, 2000 Gary Fisher
    Posts
    3,068
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The distance should depend on traffic, including bike traffic, and not on an absolute distance. The driver should merge toward the curb when approaching the intersection. He must merge right when a gap in bike lane traffic allows, the distance at which he cannot control. Also, if other traffic is backed up for a traffic signal or other source of congestion, he will be farther back. If traffic is light and he has enough distance to safely pass a cyclist before reaching the intersection, he may merge right closer to the intersection. However, under most conditions this distance will be much greater than 25 feet, especially where speeds are over 25 mph.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ladyraestewart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Austin,Texas
    My Bikes
    Trek Lexi
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Transportation Code does not, to the best of my researching abilities, address that issue. However, many municipalities take it up themselves. For example, the City of Austin has local ordinances that govern bike traffic on city streets. Most mandatory right turn lanes have signs advising motorists to yield to cyclists but also designating through lane painting and signs where the bike lane officially "ends" which are the only areas the vehicle is legally permitted to cross to turn right. Of course, as I'm sure most can surmise, about the only motorists I see who respect those areas seem to be vehicles that have bikes racks on their cars. Austin also recently implemented a new law that gives cyclists the exception to turning right when the right lane becomes a mandatory right turn PROVIDED there is a sign stating bicycles are exempt. To up the odds in the cyclists favor they are painting these lanes with a lime green lane going through the intersection. Of course, I'm sure the motorist who ignore those them anyway, think to themselves, "look they painted a wide green stripe on the road -- what's that about."
    Some people are like slinkies.
    They aren't good for anything but it's still fun to watch after you push them down the stairs.

  5. #5
    24-Speed Machine Chris516's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Wash. Grove, MD
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Allez 24-Speed Road Bike
    Posts
    4,930
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have wondered this myself, not for my own well-being, but for those that do use the bike lanes. If vehicles are allowed to do that, that is in a sense saying that the driving public have an extra lane to use, regardless of its' intended purpose and who might be using it at that time.

  6. #6
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR2, Bridgestone RB-T, Bike-E, Vision R-40, Novara Safari
    Posts
    2,982
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris516 View Post
    If vehicles are allowed to do that, that is in a sense saying that the driving public have an extra lane to use, regardless of its' intended purpose and who might be using it at that time.
    But on the other hand, if they aren't allowed to do that, that means they're turning right from a lane that's not the rightmost lane, often across the path of cyclists that they didn't notice or thought were "way back there". I think that's worse.

    Austin handles it by ending bike lanes before intersections and starting them up afterwards. Some other places handle it by letting cars turn right from the bike lanes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    94
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dougmc View Post
    But on the other hand, if they aren't allowed to do that, that means they're turning right from a lane that's not the rightmost lane, often across the path of cyclists that they didn't notice or thought were "way back there". I think that's worse.
    Exactly

    Austin handles it by ending bike lanes before intersections and starting them up afterwards. Some other places handle it by letting cars turn right from the bike lanes.
    I've noticed this almost everywhere, although I cross a busy intersection daily with bike lanes that run right up to the stop sign (4-way stop). This is the one place on my route where I get the most confused looks and hesitations from people driving cars. Some turn right in front of the bike lane, but I hardly ever see a car actually merge in the bike lane to turn right unless they are trying to avoid traffic in the other lane... Even cars traveling in the same direction as me (straight) will sit there and wait for me to go first, like I'm going to turn left from the bike lane.

    On this same road (not at an intersection), I've had drivers speed past me to turn right and then sit there in the middle of the traffic lane because they suddenly become afraid that they will hit me (I thought they had plenty of time to turn ahead of me). The last time this happened, I looked back for traffic, and then merged in the lane behind them. My way of telling them "look, I'm not gonna pass you on the right and trust that you won't plow me over, just make your freaking turn already". They still sat there at a dead stop so I passed them on the left in the turn lane. Could have been avoided if they had safely merged into the bike lane to make their turn.
    Last edited by Bachman; 06-16-11 at 10:23 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member ladyraestewart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Austin,Texas
    My Bikes
    Trek Lexi
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris516 View Post
    I have wondered this myself, not for my own well-being, but for those that do use the bike lanes. If vehicles are allowed to do that, that is in a sense saying that the driving public have an extra lane to use, regardless of its' intended purpose and who might be using it at that time.
    And we have numerous intersections in town where the vehicles do just that, move over into the bike lane waiting until the light changes or traffic clears so they can turn right. The need to install those soft barriers along the sections of the bike lanes so vehicles cannot just use them as an additional lane.
    Some people are like slinkies.
    They aren't good for anything but it's still fun to watch after you push them down the stairs.

  9. #9
    Senior Member sggoodri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Cary, NC
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek, 2001 Lemond, 2000 Gary Fisher
    Posts
    3,068
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ladyraestewart View Post
    And we have numerous intersections in town where the vehicles do just that, move over into the bike lane waiting until the light changes or traffic clears so they can turn right. The need to install those soft barriers along the sections of the bike lanes so vehicles cannot just use them as an additional lane.
    Drivers who merge into the bike lane to turn right are doing exactly the right thing. A right-turning driver must get all the way to the right before executing the turn, so as to deter passing on the right immediately before they turn right.

    Any barrier added to the bike lane will not only endanger cyclists by increasing the likelihood of right hook collisions, but also create a fall hazard for cyclists.

    If there is a cyclist in the bike lane, right-turning car drivers will decide whether to slow down and follow behind the cyclist, or pass the cyclist before merging over. This decision will depend on many factors, including the speed of the cyclist, the distance to the intersection, whether the driver will need to stop or slow at the intersection anyway, and other traffic. Drivers who merge into the bike lane a safe distance ahead of a cyclist or who drive slowly behind the cyclist when approaching a right turn are not a danger to the cyclist. Drivers who stay to the left of the bike lane before turning right are the ones cyclists should be worried about. Ending the bike lane prior to the intersection, assuming there is no right turn only lane to the right of the bike lane, is the ideal way to discourage drivers from turning right from the left side of bycyclists and to discourage cyclists from passing queued traffic on the right.

  10. #10
    24-Speed Machine Chris516's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Wash. Grove, MD
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Allez 24-Speed Road Bike
    Posts
    4,930
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ladyraestewart View Post
    They need to install those soft barriers along the sections of the bike lanes so vehicles cannot just use them as an additional lane.
    +1

  11. #11
    -=Barry=- The Human Car's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD +/- ~100 miles
    Posts
    4,077
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know if this will help as it's Maryland laws but here is what I wrote in reaction to a right hook crash http://www.baltimorespokes.org/artic...11030413431398 [Note: action is no longer appropriate and we did get the driver charged in this situation.]
    Cycling Advocate
    http://BaltimoreSpokes.org
    . . . o
    . . /L
    =()>()

  12. #12
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Austin, TX
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR2, Bridgestone RB-T, Bike-E, Vision R-40, Novara Safari
    Posts
    2,982
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ladyraestewart View Post
    The need to install those soft barriers along the sections of the bike lanes so vehicles cannot just use them as an additional lane.
    I'm not sure exactly what barriers you're referring to, but all the barriers I'm aware of are dangerous to cyclists. And remember that Austin generally permits parking in bike lanes (some areas do have signs that prohibit this, but it's the exception rather than the rule), so keeping cars out of them may not be what the city wants to do.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •