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Advocacy & Safety Cyclists should expect and demand safe accommodation on every public road, just as do all other users. Discuss your bicycle advocacy and safety concerns here.

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Old 10-14-12, 07:49 AM   #1
Looigi
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Single vehicle bicycle crash safety study.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1012074657.htm
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Old 10-14-12, 08:01 AM   #2
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interesting. I don't wear sunglasses while cycling unless I am near the beach where there are no trees on a sunny day.
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Old 10-14-12, 09:53 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Looigi View Post
Thanks for the link. I've had several debates with representatives of our local park district which controls the main MUP in our area. Despite this being touted as a commuter and transportation corridor in addition to its recreational function, the design has several features that reduce safety, especially after dark. Officially the MUP is open from 5am until 10 pm year round which certainly includes many dark periods and, in practice, the path is actually open at all times.

But the park district has actively resisted safety features for night use. When the path was extended with a new section the edges were initially marked with reflective white stripes. It made that portion of my commute much better and I felt much safer riding this portion of the path after dark compared to other sections. But the park district decided the stripes were contrary to their guidelines and went to considerable expense to have them all ground down. There's also a portion of path with some fairly sharp curves. These were also marked with white stripes initially but again the park district had the stripes removed - in that case by covering them with black paint. The various barriers (bollards and fences) along the path at intersection crossings are also poorly visible at night. Most, but not all, have some minimal reflectors - but very small and not well maintained.

Hoping the linked article might change some minds on their path design guidelines.
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Old 10-14-12, 01:15 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
Thanks for the link. I've had several debates with representatives of our local park district which controls the main MUP in our area. Despite this being touted as a commuter and transportation corridor in addition to its recreational function, the design has several features that reduce safety, especially after dark. Officially the MUP is open from 5am until 10 pm year round which certainly includes many dark periods and, in practice, the path is actually open at all times.

But the park district has actively resisted safety features for night use. When the path was extended with a new section the edges were initially marked with reflective white stripes. It made that portion of my commute much better and I felt much safer riding this portion of the path after dark compared to other sections. But the park district decided the stripes were contrary to their guidelines and went to considerable expense to have them all ground down. There's also a portion of path with some fairly sharp curves. These were also marked with white stripes initially but again the park district had the stripes removed - in that case by covering them with black paint. The various barriers (bollards and fences) along the path at intersection crossings are also poorly visible at night. Most, but not all, have some minimal reflectors - but very small and not well maintained.
I would imagine that if there is an accident there after dark the Park District would be in a very precarious position legally. By posting hours of 5 AM to 10 PM they acknowledge it's open after dark and by actually removing features designed to make after dark riding safer they are fools!
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Old 10-14-12, 06:16 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
Thanks for the link. I've had several debates with representatives of our local park district which controls the main MUP in our area. Despite this being touted as a commuter and transportation corridor in addition to its recreational function, the design has several features that reduce safety, especially after dark. Officially the MUP is open from 5am until 10 pm year round which certainly includes many dark periods and, in practice, the path is actually open at all times.

But the park district has actively resisted safety features for night use. When the path was extended with a new section the edges were initially marked with reflective white stripes. It made that portion of my commute much better and I felt much safer riding this portion of the path after dark compared to other sections. But the park district decided the stripes were contrary to their guidelines and went to considerable expense to have them all ground down. There's also a portion of path with some fairly sharp curves. These were also marked with white stripes initially but again the park district had the stripes removed - in that case by covering them with black paint. The various barriers (bollards and fences) along the path at intersection crossings are also poorly visible at night. Most, but not all, have some minimal reflectors - but very small and not well maintained.

Hoping the linked article might change some minds on their path design guidelines.
What exactly is in their guidelines that precludes such obvious safety measures? Perhaps minimizing the number and safety of cyclists is in there somewhere.
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