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  1. #1
    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    At any given daylight moment, 600k drivers are using cellphones

    Northwest lawmakers may be wasting time on distracted-driving laws, U.S. Transportation survey shows

    At any given daylight moment in America, about 660,000 drivers are using cell phones or manipulating electronic devices while driving,
    Despite a surge in states banning the use of handheld smartphones and other electronic devices behind the wheel, the number of people who admit doing it has held steady nationally since 2010, according to the poll.
    That is because enforcement hasn't been strict enough (see below). Why are there as nearly as many warnings as citations? If enough drivers get cited (10-15k+ annually) there WILL be a decrease in drivers using cellphones while driving. The fine also needs to be increased to $2000.

    The article mentions that OR police will be cracking down harder on drivers who use cellphones. I hope it happens...

    2012
    Citations – 2,151
    Warnings – 1,878
    Total Stops – 4,029

    2011
    Citations – 1,423
    Warnings – 2,359
    Total Stops – 3,782

    2010
    Citations – 1,012
    Warnings – 2,515
    Total Stops – 3,527

    Total for 3-year period
    Citations – 4,586
    Warnings – 6,752
    Total Stops – 11,338

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    $2,000 extortion for doing something that hasnt even been proven to be dangerous ?

    Da police state salutes you comrade !!

  3. #3
    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Where has it been proven not to be dangerous?

  4. #4
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agent pombero View Post
    Where has it been proven not to be dangerous?
    See http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Negative_proof

    or

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%27s_teapot

  5. #5
    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    You're so funny ILTB!

    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    $2,000 extortion for doing something that hasnt even been proven to be dangerous ?

    Da police state salutes you comrade !!
    You're so misinformed, comrade! Let me know if you need any extra reading material! I have bucketloads more!

    In 2003, cell phone use while driving was estimated to cause 333 000 total injuries, 12 000 seri- ous to critical injuries, and 2600 fatalities annually.
    and

    Compared with drivers not using cell phones while driving, the likelihood of a safety-critical event is 6 times higher for drivers dialing a cell phone and 23 times higher for those texting.
    Coben, J. H., & Zhu, M. (January 01, 2013). Keeping an eye on distracted driving. Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association, 309, 9, 877-8.

    Just talking on a cell phone while driving constitutes a dual-task that compromises a driver’s ability to maneuver the car safely, pre- sumably due to reduced attention to information on the roadway (Atchley and Dressel, 2004; Brown et al., 1969; Strayer and Drews, 2007; Strayer et al., 2003). Text messaging and driving is even worse as drivers now face a dual task that often requires them to take their eyes off the road for four times as long, leading to problems such as incorrect lane changes (Hosking et al., 2007). It decreases braking speed (Drews et al., 2009) increases speed variability, lateral speed, and lane position variability, all of which suggest a decrease in the ability to control the vehicle (Crisler et al., 2008). The dangers are especially evident for younger drivers who are unlikely to suspend a text messaging task when faced with a difficult driving situation (Lee et al., 2008). It has been estimated that texting while driv- ing contributes to 1.6 million crashes annually (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008) and is over 20 times as dan- gerous as driving while not texting (Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, 2009).
    Atchley, P., Atwood, S., & Boulton, A. (January 01, 2011). The choice to text and drive in younger drivers: Behavior may shape attitude. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 43, 1, 134-142.

    --

    Atchley, P., Dressel, J., 2004. Conversation limits the functional field of view. Human Factors 46 (4), 664.

    Brown, I., Tickner, A., Simmonds, D., 1969. Interference between concurrent tasks of driving and telephoning. Journal of Applied Psychology 53 (5), 419– 424.

    Strayer, D., Drews, F., 2007. Cell-phone induced driver distraction. Current Directions in Psychological Science 16 (3), 128.

    Strayer, D., Drews, F., Johnston, W., 2003. Cell phone-induced failures of visual atten- tion during simulated driving. Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied 9 (1), 23–32.

    Hosking, S., Young, K., Regan, M., 2007. The effects of text messaging on young novice driver performance. In: Faulks, I.J., Regan, M., Stevenson, M., Brown, J., Porter, A., Irwin, J.D. (Eds.), Distracted driving. Australasian College of Road Safety, Sydney, NSW, pp. 155–187.

    Drews, F., Yazdani, H., Godfrey, C., Cooper, J., Strayer, D., City, S., 2009. Text messaging during simulated driving. Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 51 (5), 762–770.

    Crisler, M., Brooks, J., Ogle, J., Guirl, C., Alluri, P., Dixon, K., 2008. Effect of wireless communication and entertainment devices on simulated driving performance. Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 2069 (1), 48–54.

    Lee, S., Klauer, S., Olsen, E., Simons-Morton, B., Dingus, T., Ramsey, D., et al., 2008. Detection of road hazards by novice teen and experienced adult drivers. Trans- portation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 2078 (1), 26–32.

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008. National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (DOT HS 811 059). Retrieved December 12, 2009, from http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811059.PDF.

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2008. National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey (DOT HS 811 059). Retrieved December 12, 2009, from http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811059.PDF.

    Drivers using cell phones process less visual information in the driving scene (Strayer and Drews, 2004), stop incompletely at stop signs (Strayer and Drews, 2007), and have delayed breaking responses (Watson and Strayer, 2010) and more rear-end collisions (Strayer and Drews, 2007).
    Thompson, K. R., Johnson, A. M., Emerson, J. L., Dawson, J. D., Boer, E. R., & Rizzo, M. (March 01, 2012). Distracted driving in elderly and middle-aged drivers. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 45, 711-717.

    ---

    Strayer, D.L., Drews, F.A., 2004. Profiles in driver distraction: effects of cell phone conversations on younger and older drivers. Hum. Factors 46 (4), 640–649.

    Strayer, D.L., Drews, F.A., 2007. Multitasking in the automobile. In: Kramer, A.F., Wiergamann, D.A., Kirlik, A. (Eds.), Attention: From Theory to Practice. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 121–133.

    Watson, J.M., Strayer, D.L., 2010. Supertaskers: profiles in extraordinary multitasking ability. Psychon. B Rev. 17 (4), 479–485.

    The evidence for the distracting effects of cellphones is overwhelming. Hundreds of studies have already examined this distraction and these findings have been published in scientific journals and several international scientific conferences (e.g. Regan et al., 2008). In general, these studies concluded that the use of cell phone while driving impairs driving performance, causes drivers to miss traffic signs, raises response time to unexpected events, and reduces situation awareness (Burns et al., 2002; Strayer and Drews, 2007; Lee, 2007; Lesch & Hancock, 2004; Kass et al., 2007) and ultimately increases crash injuries (Redelmeier and Tibshirani, 1997; McEvoy et al., 2005).
    Tractinsky, N., Ram, E. S., & Shinar, D. (January 01, 2013). To call or not to call—That is the question (while driving). Accident Analysis and Prevention.
    Last edited by agent pombero; 04-08-13 at 11:29 PM.

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    I got my first cell phone in 1998. That year there were 41,501 vehicle fatalities in America. In 2012 there were 32,367 fatalities in America. That coincides with an estimate that cell phone usage in America grew by 49% during that time.
    As cell phone usage has increased, vehicle fatalities have decreased.

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    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    I got my first cell phone in 1998. That year there were 41,501 vehicle fatalities in America. In 2012 there were 32,367 fatalities in America. That coincides with an estimate that cell phone usage in America grew by 49% during that time.
    As cell phone usage has increased, vehicle fatalities have decreased.
    Sources?

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    Quote Originally Posted by agent pombero View Post
    Sources?

    sources for what ? you want me to cite a copy of my first cell phone purchase ?

    or do you want me to cite the website for the department of transportation or the hundreds of other sites that list traffic fatalities in america ?

  9. #9
    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Is it time for you to reevaluate post #2?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Winnershcyclist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agent pombero View Post
    Northwest lawmakers may be wasting time on distracted-driving laws, U.S. Transportation survey shows





    That is because enforcement hasn't been strict enough (see below). Why are there as nearly as many warnings as citations? If enough drivers get cited (10-15k+ annually) there WILL be a decrease in drivers using cellphones while driving. The fine also needs to be increased to $2000.

    The article mentions that OR police will be cracking down harder on drivers who use cellphones. I hope it happens...

    2012
    Citations – 2,151
    Warnings – 1,878
    Total Stops – 4,029

    2011
    Citations – 1,423
    Warnings – 2,359
    Total Stops – 3,782

    2010
    Citations – 1,012
    Warnings – 2,515
    Total Stops – 3,527

    Total for 3-year period
    Citations – 4,586
    Warnings – 6,752
    Total Stops – 11,338
    GT

    In the Uk we are supposed to have very strict laws with huge fines Upto $1300 and its still common to see drivers on their cell phones I think iit s a case of if you can get away fine if you get caught moan like hell about Gestapo police

  11. #11
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    I got my first cell phone in 1998. That year there were 41,501 vehicle fatalities in America. In 2012 there were 32,367 fatalities in America. That coincides with an estimate that cell phone usage in America grew by 49% during that time.
    As cell phone usage has increased, vehicle fatalities have decreased.
    What year were airbags introduced into cars?

    On 11 July 1984, the U.S. government amended Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 208 (FMVSS 208) to require cars produced after 1 April 1989 to be equipped with a passive restraint for the driver.

    Gee, I wonder why fatalities by drivers and passengers has decreased?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    I got my first cell phone in 1998. That year there were 41,501 vehicle fatalities in America. In 2012 there were 32,367 fatalities in America. That coincides with an estimate that cell phone usage in America grew by 49% during that time.
    As cell phone usage has increased, vehicle fatalities have decreased.
    So? Cars have also gotten much safer in recent years (for their occupants; not for pedestrians or cyclists hit by distracted motorists). Safety standards and regulations have steadily increased, leading to an overall decrease in deaths. On the other hand, it's really poor logic to say that this is evidence that cell phone use is safe. Perhaps deaths would have decreased even more if it hadn't been for the simultaneous rise in cell use. (In fact, the evidence shows that that is exactly the case, especially when you realize that traffic deaths have decreased faster in countries that more strictly enforce traffic laws). Also, I would guess that statistics on how many cyclists are killed or injured because of cell phone use by motorists are sketchy because of poor investigation by police, poor official collection of non-motorist fatality and injury statistics, low reporting rates (without expensive vehicles involved, there is less incentive to go to police), and rampant hit-and-run by motorists who know that they can get away with crimes against people who can't chase them down when they take off after a collision. Also, most motorist-cyclist interactions are non-fatal, so the total number of fatalities of all road users decreasing is almost totally irrelevant to this question. It's a factor that pushes the number up while other factors simultaneously push the number down. You can't just look at it in isolation...you have to examine the evidence, as researchers are doing. And they are finding universally that texting/talking/dialing while driving is dangerous...in some cases as dangerous as being drunk.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Notso_fastLane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    I got my first cell phone in 1998. That year there were 41,501 vehicle fatalities in America. In 2012 there were 32,367 fatalities in America. That coincides with an estimate that cell phone usage in America grew by 49% during that time.
    As cell phone usage has increased, vehicle fatalities have decreased.
    I would note that you're somewhat comparing apples and oranges here. Vehicles have become safer, mostly due to increases in airbags (which only became mandatory some years after you purchased your first cell phone, IIRC), and other safety increases like traction control, anti-lock brakes, etc.

    I'm not sure that there is good data on the actual number of accidents that include incidents with no injury. I suspect that number is probably increasing (or steady per capita, maybe), but I would not at all be surprised if it is increasing. Maybe the insurance company data is better, but I don't know how much they are required to report. Not all accidents get reported to police, since the laws vary by state for 'fender benders'.

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    Fact is the roads in America are far safer than they used to be. This is true even with increased cell phone usage. Fact.

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    genec genec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    Fact is the roads in America are far safer than they used to be. This is true even with increased cell phone usage. Fact.
    I want to know how this could be... Roads that were once signed at 40MPH in my area now are signed at 50MPH... and drivers are going even faster. The roads themselves have not been modified; there are no changes to sightlines or any other structure on the road, just increased speeds. How does raising the speed limit make a road safer?

    Now I can believe that cars themselves are more protective of the passengers inside... but I do not believe roads are safer, or that drivers have suddenly improved in their skills. (in fact I believe the latter)

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    Senior Member alhedges's Avatar
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    It is, of course, quite possible that cell phones have led to a larger increase in the accident rate, but not the death rate, for any number of easily imaginable reasons, including that they may primarily be used in city traffic, which is relatively low speed. But it would be helpful to have some actual data.

    There is interesting data on red light cameras, which shows an increase in accidents, but a decrease in fatalities...the accidents being caused by people slamming on the brakes when they realize there is a camera at the light, resulting in a relatively safe rear-ender. The decrease in fatalities being caused by fewer cases of people running red lights, which is more dangerous because it tends to happen at higher speed.

    Of course, even low speed collisions are dangerous to pedestrians and bikers.

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    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angio Graham View Post
    Fact is the roads in America are far safer than they used to be. This is true even with increased cell phone usage. Fact.
    Is this your personal feeling? Where is the literature supporting your claim? You wrote in post #2 that driving while using a cellphone hasn't been proven to be dangerous. Has your position changed after reviewing post #5?

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    Senior Member GP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agent pombero View Post
    Is this your personal feeling? Where is the literature supporting your claim? You wrote in post #2 that driving while using a cellphone hasn't been proven to be dangerous. Has your position changed after reviewing post #5?
    He said "fact" twice. How much more evidence do you people need?

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    Yabba-Dabba-Doo! AlmostTrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genec View Post
    What year were airbags introduced into cars?

    On 11 July 1984, the U.S. government amended Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 208 (FMVSS 208) to require cars produced after 1 April 1989 to be equipped with a passive restraint for the driver.

    Gee, I wonder why fatalities by drivers and passengers has decreased?
    …And anti lock brakes, and traction/stability control systems, and on board “driver you are about to run off the road/hit something” notification/take over control of the vehicle, systems.

    Yes, today’s cars are much safer! Which helps lower the annual death rate. I believe the recession has also lowered the total miles driven in recent years. Pretty hard to kill someone/die in your car when you're not driving it.

    Unfortunately we have done nothing to improve the operator of these safer machines.
    Have Bike, Will Travel

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    Senior Member Keith99's Avatar
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    I would say it is pretty obvious cell phone use increases risk when driving.

    As does ANY distraction, which includes radio or talking to a passenger.

    The issue for any of these is how much does it increase the risk.

    I've seen my share of idiots on cells where it is obvious that it increases it excessively. E.g the ones where the failure to maintain speed and lane position (or even failure to stay in their lane) is the reason why I noticed the cell use.

    I've seen other idiots talking on their cells when leaving the parking lot of a store near work. No reason why they could not have finished before starting to drive. But the big issue in this case is that they are usually making a rather nasty left turn out of the lot. One that usually is a pain even with total lack of distractions.
    Perish any man who suspects that these men either did or suffered anything unseemly.

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    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith99 View Post
    I would say it is pretty obvious cell phone use increases risk when driving.
    It is surprising there are still some holdouts who believe it doesn't increase risk/isn't dangerous. It wouldn't be surprising that these are the people most likely to be using their cellphones while driving.

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    Senior Member PDX Reborn's Avatar
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    This won't be an issue once cars start driving by themselves Those numbers are shocking but not surprising. Most of my, "close calls" have been with drivers on their phones. Its actually quite funny to see them using all kinds of tactics to hide it from view.
    I especially love this one: "phone pressed against the neck"...classic!

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    Mmm hm! agent pombero's Avatar
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    Too many drivers think they're celebrities & need that constant connectedness. It's disgusting and very narcissistic.

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    Yabba-Dabba-Doo! AlmostTrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by agent pombero View Post
    It is surprising there are still some holdouts who believe it doesn't increase risk/isn't dangerous. It wouldn't be surprising that these are the people most likely to be using their cellphones while driving.
    It doesn't surprise me. Look how long some refused to believe cigarettes caused any health issues, even decades after we had plenty of "proof".

    So, see? For some, it really doesn't matter how much proof you have.
    Have Bike, Will Travel

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    genec genec's Avatar
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    I heard on NPR just a while ago that AT&T just conducted a survey of business folks... 49% admitted to texting or using apps while driving.

    This was on the radio, so I can't cite the source.

    However here are some interesting tidbits from other AT&T surveys... http://www.att.com/gen/press-room?pid=23181

    Quote Originally Posted by AT&T
    Texting while driving facts

    • Those who send text messages while driving are 23 times more likely to be in a crash.2
    • Of all cell phone related tasks — including talking, dialing, or reaching for the phone — texting while driving is the most dangerous.3
    • In 2010, texting while driving increased 50 percent in one year, and two out of 10 drivers say they've sent text messages or emails while behind the wheel — despite a rush by states to ban the practice. 3
    • When drivers read or send a text message, their reaction time is doubled. When asked to respond to a flashing light while texting behind the wheel, drivers were more than 11 times more likely to miss the light altogether.4
    • Nearly half of commuters (49 percent) admitted to texting while driving, a higher rate than reported by teens (43 percent).
    • They are doing so more than they used to. Six in 10 commuters said they never texted while driving three years ago.
    • Texting while driving despite knowing the risks. 98 percent said sending a text or email while driving isn’t safe.
    • For many, it has become a habit. More than 40 percent of those who admitted to texting while driving called it a habit.
    AT&T is motivated to downplay this... as there could be some judgement in the future connecting their deep pockets to some cell phone related incident... and yet, here they are, telling us the results of surveys they have done on texting and driving.

    Please note that item in bold and see if you think there is any relationship between texting and not seeing cyclists on the road....

    The AT&T info above on reaction time is derived from a Texas study... http://tti.tamu.edu/group/cts/texting-and-driving/

    Now with all these tidbits of information... someone will still come on this thread and deny any connection between texting drivers and motorists hitting cyclists... and may even stay "prove it." Just watch.
    Last edited by genec; 04-09-13 at 12:52 PM.

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