Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Advocacy & Safety (http://www.bikeforums.net/advocacy-safety/)
-   -   Weight limit on bike share plan (http://www.bikeforums.net/advocacy-safety/887437-weight-limit-bike-share-plan.html)

squirtdad 05-02-13 03:27 PM

Weight limit on bike share plan
 
260 pound limit per the contract, but no reall way to enforce. But it is NY so there is an uproar





http://news.yahoo.com/yorkers-heavy-...210529558.html

B. Carfree 05-02-13 09:56 PM

The complaints are funny.

ItsJustMe 05-03-13 07:16 AM

Do they expect the program to try to maintain a distribution across all the rental stations of special bikes designed to handle extra-heavy people and try to get those people to use only Clydesdale models? If one is not available, you expect them to just say "Oh well, guess I'm not going anywhere today." Or do they expect everyone including 110 pound women to pedal around 50 pound Clyde models?

I-Like-To-Bike 05-03-13 09:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ItsJustMe (Post 15582914)
Or do they expect everyone including 110 pound women to pedal around 50 pound Clyde models?

Why not? Men and women of all shapes and sizes in NL do it every day. Short trips in Manhattan shouldn't involve too much huffing or puffing.

njkayaker 05-03-13 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by squirtdad (Post 15580895)
But it is NY so there is an uproar

A few people are complaining. In a city of 7 million people, that isn't really news.

The article is no evidence of an "uproar".

Quote:

Originally Posted by ItsJustMe (Post 15582914)
Do they expect ....

You can't please everybody (certainly not in a city of 7 million people). The mere existance of a complaint doesn't mean that complaint is meaningful or useful.

Brandonub 05-03-13 09:16 AM

I'm sure this will stop all nine of the three hundred pounders that were super excited to bike around the city...

njkayaker 05-03-13 09:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brandonub (Post 15583537)
I'm sure this will stop all nine of the three hundred pounders that were super excited to bike around the city...

It would be nice to accomodate everybody. Clearly, having different bikes isn't really practical and the notion of replacing the bikes they already have with sturdier models is just a suggestion to kill the program out-right.

Brandonub 05-03-13 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by njkayaker (Post 15583579)
It would be nice to accomodate everybody. Clearly, having different bikes isn't really practical and the notion of replacing the bikes they already have with sturdier models is just a suggestion to kill the program out-right.

Right, agreed, it'd be nice to accommodate everyone, but it's just not really feasible. I think what they've done is pretty good - bikes that are certified up to a pretty heft weight, probably safe a bit above, and call it a day. I'm skeptical of whether the people that are upset about this even had any particular desire to ride; I think it's more likely that it's just narcissism and a hunt to be angry about something.

RaleighSport 05-03-13 09:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ItsJustMe (Post 15582914)
Do they expect the program to try to maintain a distribution across all the rental stations of special bikes designed to handle extra-heavy people and try to get those people to use only Clydesdale models? If one is not available, you expect them to just say "Oh well, guess I'm not going anywhere today." Or do they expect everyone including 110 pound women to pedal around 50 pound Clyde models?

In terms of history it wasn't very long ago that everyone riding a bike rode close to 50lb fixed gear bikes everywhere....

ratdog 05-03-13 09:44 AM

Disclaimer put in there because NYC leads the country for having the most lawyers according to statistics, easily doubles the next closest city which is Chicago. If you have to compare Lawyers per capita, Washington DC would take first place and then NYC would be second.

Unfortunate, but avoiding liability is part of the daily life around here.

IMO, those bikes should be able to handle a 350 LB person the way they are built but nobody wants to stick their necks out if someone hops a curb and breaks their neck.

I-Like-To-Bike 05-03-13 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RaleighSport (Post 15583600)
In terms of history it wasn't very long ago that everyone riding a bike rode close to 50lb fixed gear bikes everywhere....

Don't you mean 50lb single speed (NOT "fixed gear") bikes, usually with foot brakes, or sometimes with hand operated cable/rod actuated brakes?

I doubt if many cyclists in past history rode fixed gear bikes unless on a closed course race track.

RaleighSport 05-03-13 11:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike (Post 15583929)
Don't you mean 50lb single speed (NOT "fixed gear") bikes, usually with foot brakes, or sometimes with hand operated cable/rod actuated brakes?

I doubt if many cyclists in past history rode fixed gear bikes unless on a closed course race track.

I was more romanticizing this quote, you are right with the advent of the freewheel people ditched fixed pretty fast.
I still feel that variable gears are only for people over forty-five.
Isn't it better to triumph by the strength of your muscles than by the artifice of a derailer?
We are getting soft...As for me, give me a fixed gear!
--Henri Desgrange, L'Équipe article of 1902

Matariki 05-03-13 01:07 PM

The issue is pretty much a non-starter because very, very few big folks will take advantage of the program.

ted m 05-17-13 10:02 AM

I'm bigger than 260# and ride often. I would not be angered by such a weight limit on a bike share. I am well aware that most bikes are not meant for me and that is my problem and not anyone else's.

CB HI 05-17-13 02:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ted m (Post 15636205)
I'm bigger than 260# and ride often. I would not be angered by such a weight limit on a bike share. I am well aware that most bikes are not meant for me and that is my problem and not anyone else's.

Other than kids bicycles, all bikes are designed to handle more than 260 with the exception of race wheels with less than 32 spokes.

The weight limit is set just to use as an excuse for liability.

alhedges 05-17-13 02:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CB HI (Post 15637145)
Other than kids bicycles, all bikes are designed to handle more than 260 with the exception of race wheels with less than 32 spokes.

The weight limit is set just to use as an excuse for liability.

Folding bikes aren't, and - based on the experiences of one of my riding buddies who weighs just at 260 - the wheels on most regular bikes aren't prepared for that weight, either: he typically broke a spoke on his rear wheel once a month until he had some 36(?) spoke wheels made.

However, having a spoke break after a month of being ridden ~2 hours per day almost every day is much different from having an occasional heavy person go for a shorter ride.

Edit: Those bikes do look extremely robust, though.

lostarchitect 05-17-13 03:34 PM

There is no uproar. A very, very small number of people are annoyed, and some media outlets are amplifying this.

lostarchitect 05-17-13 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ted m (Post 15636205)
I'm bigger than 260# and ride often. I would not be angered by such a weight limit on a bike share. I am well aware that most bikes are not meant for me and that is my problem and not anyone else's.


Nobody is going to stop people on the side of the road with a scale. It's a liability thing, that's all.

plumberroy 05-17-13 03:39 PM

I'm 310 I have been as heavy as 340 I have broke 2 spokes in my life both on bikes saved from the scrap heap All though I just got back to riding lately from 2004- 2008 I rode 70-80 miles a week on bikes that were yard sale fix ups or save from the scrap fix ups.
Roy

I-Like-To-Bike 05-17-13 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lostarchitect (Post 15637432)
Nobody is going to stop people on the side of the road with a scale. It's a liability thing, that's all.

If the goal of this "liability thing" is to reduce the possibility of paying out for injury to share bike users, without regard to any increased risk, why not ban all cyclists from using the share bikes? The "liability thing" will be permanently resolved.

CB HI 05-17-13 05:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alhedges (Post 15637262)
Folding bikes aren't, and - based on the experiences of one of my riding buddies who weighs just at 260 - the wheels on most regular bikes aren't prepared for that weight, either: he typically broke a spoke on his rear wheel once a month until he had some 36(?) spoke wheels made.

However, having a spoke break after a month of being ridden ~2 hours per day almost every day is much different from having an occasional heavy person go for a shorter ride.

Edit: Those bikes do look extremely robust, though.

I have watch a 350 lb'er ride a road bike on centuries without concern of broken spokes. I have also had spokes break every 100 miles on a new bike (at 200 lb) until I rebuilt the wheels myself.

Not sure about your reference about folders, the smaller wheels are general stronger.

FBinNY 05-17-13 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ratdog (Post 15583673)
Disclaimer put in there because NYC leads the country for having the most lawyers according to statistics, easily doubles the next closest city which is Chicago. If you have to compare Lawyers per capita, Washington DC would take first place and then NYC would be second.

Unfortunate, but avoiding liability is part of the daily life around here.

IMO, those bikes should be able to handle a 350 LB person the way they are built but nobody wants to stick their necks out if someone hops a curb and breaks their neck.

Two points, the per capita lawyers figure is very misleading. Many of those are corporate and government regulation lawyers who don't litigate torts. To have any sense of a meaningful per capita lawyer number, you'd have to quality it by specialty, ie criminal, regulation, finance, real estate, tort, etc. If you did so, I'd be very surprised if NYC ranked high on the list based on tort lawyers per capita.

As for suitability for 350# riders for these bikes (or most bikes) --- Why?. Weight capacity calls for more strength, which mean more weight and probably excess stiffness. Why should the majority of clients be handicapped with excess burdens in order to be suitable for a small minority or clients? Heavier riders will be harder on the bikes, increasing maintenance costs disproportionately.

I know everyone these days feels they have rights and the world needs to adapt to their unique needs, but that's a short sighted notion. If everything is adapted to the fringe, than the majority will always be adapting to the minority. So rather than a rights issue, we might look it as a pay your own way issue.

Tel0004 05-17-13 06:38 PM

I see nothing wrong with this. There are going to be limitations, and there has to be a weight limit somewhere.

Not I think the bikes could probably hold 300 lbs, and I think it would be nice if they did some more testing, then upped the weight limit (once proven safe), on the same bikes.

I weigh 272, and I would take one of these bikes for a ride if I was in NYC for a trip.

If I lived there, I would just use my own bike.

alhedges 05-18-13 09:13 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by CB HI (Post 15637827)
I have watch a 350 lb'er ride a road bike on centuries without concern of broken spokes. I have also had spokes break every 100 miles on a new bike (at 200 lb) until I rebuilt the wheels myself.

Not sure about your reference about folders, the smaller wheels are general stronger.

Not a wheel problem with folders; folders tend to have a long seatpost that can act as a lever, putting more strain on the frame:

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=317637

The weight limit for Bike Fridays is 230, with a 260 "heavy rider" upgrade available; for a Brompton it's 240.

CB HI 05-18-13 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alhedges (Post 15640886)
Not a wheel problem with folders; folders tend to have a long seatpost that can act as a lever, putting more strain on the frame:

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=317637

The weight limit for Bike Fridays is 230, with a 260 "heavy rider" upgrade available; for a Brompton it's 240.

Again, limitations based more on liability vice engineering. Many of these limits get set at 50% of the actual engineering limit.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:06 AM.