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Old 06-25-13, 10:52 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by volosong View Post
Yeah. Most of the other posters talk like they don't wear helmets.
Some of us actually don't. That doesn't make us the fools or daredevils some make us out to be. We're simply, like those who do wear helmets. folks who made a risk assessment and do what we feel makes sense for us.
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Old 07-06-13, 10:07 AM   #27
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The article leaves a lot of questions unanswered. I once read a fun little book entitled, "How to Lie With Statistics". It taught me to look a little harder at statistics, especially when they are being used to persuade.

This information from one of the source articles, though less sensational, would have been more useful:

"Every year, more than 500,000 people visit emergency rooms in the United States with bicycle-related injuries. Of those, nearly 85,000 were head injuries in 2009. There are about 600 deaths a year, with two-thirds being attributed to TBI."

So, in 2009, out of the 300+ million people in the United States, there were, 85,000 bicycle-related emergency room visits that reported head injuries, and 400 deaths were attributed to traumatic brain injury. Considering that helmets on cyclists are optional, cycling is a VERY safe sport.

On the other hand, I always wear a helmet when I ride, and I doubt many people would argue the safety benefits of a helmet.
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Old 07-06-13, 10:33 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by rustybyker View Post
I doubt many people would argue the safety benefits of a helmet.
You must be new here.
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Old 07-06-13, 10:47 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by rustybyker View Post
and I doubt many people would argue the safety benefits of a helmet.
That's exactly the point. There is legitimate room for debate. Not whether helmets save lives, which, of course, they do.

The debate is about the extent that they do, the conditions where they're of benefit and those where they're not, and about the general risk of head injury when cycling, which is actually pretty low, no matter how you measure it.

It's also about attitudes. Those who don't wear helmets generally respect the decisions of others to wear them, but the reverse isn't true. The pro helmet folks portray those who chose not to wear them as ignorant, or as daredevils, or as negligent of their own safety. In short helmet wearers treat non helmet wearers the same way as non-smokers treat smokers, in some cases worse; like ex-smokers treat smokers.

In short, helmet wearers (not all) consider themselves enlightened and knowledgeable, while those who feel differently just need to be educated.

I've gotten used to (not that I like it) the "where's your helmet?" from other cyclists, but now have to hear it from motorists as well (maybe they're also cyclists?) including the one who nearly T-boned me when HE ran a red light.
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Old 07-12-13, 09:56 AM   #30
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This article makes a couple of fundamental errors.

1) That is that there is a single sport call cycling, and it's done only on roads in traffic.

In reality, there about 10 different types of riding, from teen males on BMX bicycles without helmets, doing urban trick riding (probably account for less then 1% of the total miles ridden, and about 90% of the head injuries), to grandpa on a hybrid (who probably accounts for 25% of total miles ridden, and a statistically insignificant number of head injuries).

2) All head injuries are created equal. In reality, a small abrasion on the face is considered a head injury by doctors (who will want a CT scan to make sure nothing more serious occurred). In cycling, traumatic brain injuries are a very small portion of the total head injuries, scrapes and cuts account for most of them. External bruising would account for most of the rest. ER reports would show all of these as head injuries.

I read somewhere that for every 1,000,000,000 miles ridden, there is 1 permanent traumatic brain injury and about 40 deaths.
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Old 07-13-13, 12:55 PM   #31
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Let me tell you THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE of death:













Being born.
All the rest is risk management.
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Old 07-15-13, 11:52 AM   #32
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And there's a 50 mile long 2 story bus in the NW quadrant of the moon you can only see on the first night after a full moon.....

Full of pit bulls and killer bees.....

Last edited by Booger1; 07-15-13 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 07-15-13, 08:39 PM   #33
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Hey, Booger, the Incongruent Thread is in Foo.
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Old 07-17-13, 12:36 PM   #34
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English translation:

It's a useless study that can come up with any conclusion the highest bidder wishes.....
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