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  1. #1
    Senior Member Delta's Avatar
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    Had my first tumble last night

    Ouch. My shoulder, knee and elbow sting quite a bit. Some car beeped and I turned to look, and when I turned back I saw I was heading straight for a puddle of mud. I had to just hit it straight on so at least I would head into the grass. As soon as I hid it my bike lost control and I ended up flipping over sideways and falling on my arse.
    Luckily I was wearing my helmet, cuz I hit my head quite hard. My neck's a little tender. But I am ok. Interesting experience.

  2. #2
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
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    REAR VIEW MIRROR, helmet or eyeglass mounted

    you can view the traffic in front and behind at the same time!
    Peter Wang, LCI
    Houston, TX USA

  3. #3
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kf5nd
    REAR VIEW MIRROR, helmet or eyeglass mounted

    you can view the traffic in front and behind at the same time!
    Do you know one that isn't "twitchy?"

    I tried one on my sunglasses and within moments it was unadjusted and a mess. If I could find one that would stay put, that would be a good option... Have any recommendations?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincenzosi
    Do you know one that isn't "twitchy?"

    I tried one on my sunglasses and within moments it was unadjusted and a mess. If I could find one that would stay put, that would be a good option... Have any recommendations?
    http://www.cycleaware.com/products/reflex.php

    I love this mirror. I have used it on over 400 rides. Keep in mind that it takes a while to learn to use a mirror like this. It is just like wearing contact lenses, tying your shoes, or riding a bike for that matter. You can't just use it once and say...."i hate that mirror, it is hard to get adjusted." It will take probably 20 or more long rides to get good at using a mirror like this.

    And then you will be lost without it. I am able to be nearly as efficient as i am with my car mirrors by using this cycling mirror. I highly recommend it.


  5. #5
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    I don't mind spending the time to get it adjusted just right... That's fine with me...

    It's just that riding with them always seems to require an adjustment every few miles... I'll check that one out though. I like that the base is separate too...

    May have to look into this one Thanks!
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincenzosi
    Do you know one that isn't "twitchy?"

    I tried one on my sunglasses and within moments it was unadjusted and a mess. If I could find one that would stay put, that would be a good option... Have any recommendations?
    If you like the handlebar mounts try this one:

    http://www.mirrycle.com/mountainmirrycle.htm

    Very solid design and it swings out of the way if the bike goes down.

  7. #7
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    Good stuff... I'm not quite sure what I want to use, actually... I like the idea of a helmet mount, but I hate the idea of sticking anything to my helmet. I like the handlebar mount, but it kinda requires me to take my eyes off the road a bit to catch it...

    You would think buying something like a mirror would be easy But as usual, everything is a tradeoff!

    Thanks for the suggestions, though! At least I have a starting point now!
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  8. #8
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    PS: R8ingbull, is that your site?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincenzosi
    It's just that riding with them always seems to require an adjustment every few miles... .

    Thanks!
    That is the learning that i speak of. I remember thinking that at first as well. The first few times you find yourself fiddling with it all of the time and getting frustrated. That is where most people give up. If you stick with it, you soon find that it never needs adjusting anymore. You soon find out that you never have to mess with it and hardly ever notice it unless, you don't have it.

    A lot of the learning is "learning how to find the mirror, in your peripheral vision. Your eyes have to learn how to go out and find the mirror. Then it is just a matter of getting it at the proper angle. I set mine up so the left (towards me) side just barely shows the side of my head. The bottom third of the mirror reflects my left shoulder.

    This provides a referance for your brain to know what the mirror is looking at. It makes the road behind you very easy to locate. To reiterate, this and every bike mirror takes some learning. It also takes MANY rides to get the hang of it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    Got it. I'm gonna give it a go again. It's kinda dangerous riding in NYC without one, I've just gotten really good at it
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  11. #11
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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  12. #12
    Perineal Pressurized dobber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MERTON
    rei has the "take-a-look" mirrors. they are the best.
    Does it come with the rubber strips or are the purchased separately?

  13. #13
    Senior Member Metro's Avatar
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    Most glasses mounted mirrors stay put once you have figured them out. I have the one featured on the REI link above. The trick is to adjust it so you can just see the edge of your ear. Once you get it set, it should be no problem. Practice using it on the bike. Find a quiet street, ride slowly along, tilt your head slightly to the left. You should be able to see directly behind you clearly. Practice looking again and again until it becomes second nature.

  14. #14
    Senior Member globie's Avatar
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    Interestingly, I also just took a major spill 11 days ago, and I too am hoping a good mirror will prevent another. A turn lane came up on the right, and I glanced over my left shoulder to make sure the through-lane was clear. When I looked back, my wheel hit a little 1.5-inch groove running with the right-turn lane. My bike took the groove, but my body kept on a straight line. I'll be out of action for awhile with two broken ribs. When I went to retrieve my ride from the LBS, the owner recommended a Third Eye mirror that clamps to the earpost of eyeglasses. Here's hoping the mirrors help!

  15. #15
    Senior Member Delta's Avatar
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    Anywho. My shoulder has gotten quite tender throughout the day. I'm gonna need some serious massage therapy tonight. I guess I'll be out of commision for a couple of days so I can recover quickly.

  16. #16
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    Not for nothing dude, but you may wanna see a doctor, just to make sure everything's in order... Sounds like you may have spilled harder than you thought!
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  17. #17
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    Pfft mirrors are overrated, you'll learn to ignore honks.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by globie
    Interestingly, I also just took a major spill 11 days ago, and I too am hoping a good mirror will prevent another. A turn lane came up on the right, and I glanced over my left shoulder to make sure the through-lane was clear. When I looked back, my wheel hit a little 1.5-inch groove running with the right-turn lane. My bike took the groove, but my body kept on a straight line. I'll be out of action for awhile with two broken ribs. When I went to retrieve my ride from the LBS, the owner recommended a Third Eye mirror that clamps to the earpost of eyeglasses. Here's hoping the mirrors help!
    I also use and recommend the take-a-look mirror. However, a mirror is no substitute for looking back before you merge! You can use the mirror to decide whether it's even worth looking back, but you should always look back over your shoulder before moving laterally. This is true whether operating a bicycle, motorcycle, or car...

  19. #19
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    I've had mirrors on and off over the past seven years. Currently I ride without one. All those I have had were handlebar mounted. The Rhode Gear type was the latest. This variety has an oval mirror (a opposed the round Mirycle which I've had, too) and plugs into the bar ends, making it suitable for MTB and drop bars. I tend to break mirrors by hitting them on things. I haven't tried helmet mirrors -- I had enough trouble getting used to triple-focus eyeglasses 12 months ago! (Ranger, I accept your comments).

    Looking over the shoulder is a cycling skill that must still be cultivated and maintained, mirror or not, I believe.

  20. #20
    Senior Member vincenzosi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    Looking over the shoulder is a cycling skill that must still be cultivated and maintained, mirror or not, I believe.
    I've actually gotten to a point where it's natural enough that it doesn't even phase me anymore. I have a feeling the mirror would help, but then in the back of my mind I'm thinking it's so routine for me to look back anyway, I may not even use it if I get it...

    Who knows... Guess all it'll take is one good spill to make that decision for me...
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  21. #21
    2-Cyl, 1/2 HP @ 90 RPM slvoid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MERTON
    rei has the "take-a-look" mirrors. they are the best.
    Yeah.. I wouldn't give advice for something I haven't even used yet.
    They're not the best, trust me. They move around on your glasses and put extra weight on em.
    I used to have one on my helmet, my eye developed a weird twitch always looking up at the upper left for what's behind me. Honestly, it doesn't bounce, and I learned that by being able to see my left shoulder while I'm standing and looking 45 degrees up, when I'm on my bike, I can see behind me, it's very quick to adjust and it was really stable. The only thing was... I seriously developed this weird twitch in my left eye from constantly looking into it.
    After an accident where it broke off, I never replaced it and I've been fine since. I always look at least a few seconds ahead for hazards and learn to take quick glances behind me.

  22. #22
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    The disadvantage of bar mounted mirrors it that they have a very limited field of view. I use the Third Eye glasses mounted on - with slight head movement you can scan several lanes behind you. Looking over your shoulder before you change lanes gives a visual cue to following drivers that you will be pulling out.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Metro
    Most glasses mounted mirrors stay put once you have figured them out. I have the one featured on the REI link above. The trick is to adjust it so you can just see the edge of your ear.
    You must sit in a fairly upright position. I tried this adjustment technique this morning. Adjusting the mirror so I could just see the edge of my ear made it so that all I could see (behind my ear) was my left shoulder. But I'm in a fairly aggressive position (my saddle is about two inches above the top of my handlebars).

    Serge

  24. #24
    Senior Member Delta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vincenzosi
    Not for nothing dude, but you may wanna see a doctor, just to make sure everything's in order... Sounds like you may have spilled harder than you thought!
    Thankfully I'm feeling much better. The shoulder only bothered me for about 2 days. Thanks for the advice.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    Looking over the shoulder is a cycling skill that must still be cultivated and maintained, mirror or not, I believe.
    Agreed.

    The ability to look over your shoulder is a very important skill because the mirror has blind spots and you don't want to just "dart" out of your position. There are going to be time when you have to cross a four lane road with no lights and scan for all traffic. It's at this point (where you must take your eyes off the wheel) that your front wheel can hit a pot hole or rut and jar you off the handlebar. This happened to me so you always need to be aware of this danger.

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