Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    WEST NEW YORK, USA
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott CR1 Pro carbon, 2013 Brompton S6L-X titanium, 2013 Citizen Tokyo steel
    Posts
    3,106
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Risks of cycling, walking and driving put in context

    "Deaths are often considered a better comparison measure, since they almost always involve crashes with motor vehicles, are reliably recorded, and are the most devastating type of injury. So how do deaths compare between modes? British Columbia Motor Vehicle Branch data for the same years indicate there were 10 deaths a year on average (all age groups) when cycling, 70 when walking, and 300 when driving.

    Thus, bicycling had the lowest “burden” of deaths and head injuries of the three transportation modes."

    Read the full article: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Ris...#ixzz2YfOZA6nh

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    20,513
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    It's an interesting article, thanks for posting.

    It shows that we tend to exaggerate the risks of cycling, while tuning out the high rate of injury while driving.

    One nice tweak is how statistics can be manipulated to lead to various conclusions depending on what's measures. Trips is one measure, and so is distance, but since cycling is often recreational, maybe we should look at time, or the risk of death per hour for each activity.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    3,943
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Burden" is one thing.

    "Rate" is another.

    It's impossible to tell which activity is riskier without knowing the total amount of time the entire population studied spent performing each activity.

    Never mind the fact that participants in each activity have a lot of control over the level of risk they experience. Not total control, but a significant amount.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    5,721
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Who cares?

    All these type of forum "death" questions are asked because the poster(s) is/are fearful.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,847
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
    Who cares?

    All these type of forum "death" questions are asked because the poster(s) is/are fearful.
    Says the guy who won't even straddle a bicycle without first putting on a helmet.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also depends where you live. If you are lucky enough to live in a city that has a cycling culture, with lots of bike-friendly infrastructure and policies that favor cycling you are likely to see much less injuries and deaths than places that don't, and where the car is king.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Or I should say the rate of injury and death of an area depends in large part on the quality and amount of the cycling infrastructure, or lack of.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    My Bikes
    2012 Trek Allant
    Posts
    1,428
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Number of deaths in a year is a meaningless statistic without knowing the total number of trips or number of miles travelled per mode.

    10 cyclist deaths for 100 rides is 10% death rate.

    300 driver deaths for 50000 rides is 0.6% death rate, and therefore much safer.

  9. #9
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    5,721
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Six jours View Post
    Says the guy who won't even straddle a bicycle without first putting on a helmet.
    I'm not fearful, but I'm not stupid either. Kind of like going to a war zone, I wasn't fearful but I still carried my weapon.

  10. #10
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Scalarville
    Posts
    960
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spivonious View Post
    Number of deaths in a year is a meaningless statistic without knowing the total number of trips or number of miles travelled per mode.

    10 cyclist deaths for 100 rides is 10% death rate.

    300 driver deaths for 50000 rides is 0.6% death rate, and therefore much safer.
    I'd probably go with deaths/hour rather than deaths per mile.
    Lightning P-38 / M5 M-Racer/Ryan Vanguard

  11. #11
    Senior Member Chaco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Encinitas CA
    My Bikes
    Scott CR1 Team
    Posts
    827
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spivonious View Post
    Number of deaths in a year is a meaningless statistic without knowing the total number of trips or number of miles travelled per mode.

    10 cyclist deaths for 100 rides is 10% death rate.

    300 driver deaths for 50000 rides is 0.6% death rate, and therefore much safer.
    Well if you read the article, you'd see that's exactly what the author did -- he looked at the death rate compared to trips / miles traveled. Based on trips, bicycling had 14 deaths per 100 million trips, compared to 10 for driving. Based on distance, bicycling had 3 deaths per 100 million km, compared to 1 for cars.

    So I guess you could say that cycling is 3 times as dangerous as driving, until you factor in the distance: around 60 million miles.

    I'd bet that once you factored in the miles per trip, cycling would be about the same as driving, since the average car trip is around 60 to 80 miles (my guesstimate), while the average bike ride is probably around 20 miles or less.

    Also, keep in mind that the automobile deaths basically consist of 100% licensed drivers, while the cyclist deaths include mountain bikers, and tons of people who don't have the foggiest notion of how to ride a bike, i.e. people who salmon, ride on sidewalks all the time, etc.

    Finally, as the author points out, the stats don't include health offsets from the activity: in the case of driving, these are all negative; in the case of cycling, they are almost all positive.

    Bottom line to me: cycling is safer than driving, and much better for you!
    Scott CR1 Team

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    pdx
    My Bikes
    2007 carpe diem frame custom build, trek 7.9 frame custom build, custom built chinese carbon fiber road bike, shopping bike
    Posts
    2,644
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Motorist deaths should also be adjusted for:

    1. Deaths (e.g. cancer, lung disease, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes) attributed to motoring.
    2. Deaths attributed to anthropogenic climate change.
    Road rash is a precious gift. Road rash is your friend. Bask in it, appreciate it, love it. Above all, learn from it. --Robert Hurst

  13. #13
    Senior Member enigmaT120's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Falls City, OR
    My Bikes
    2012 Salsa Fargo 2, Rocky Mountain Fusion, circa '93
    Posts
    1,425
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I liked this blog post (it's been mentioned in other posts on the forum, sorry if it's redundant):

    http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/...ransportation/

    I just pay attention to death rates per mile, as I'm not just heading out for an hour of bike riding. I'm going to work which is 9 miles in the morning, and 9 to 40 miles home after work. I'm going someplace. Bicycling is transportation for me. I don't think it's dangerous.
    Ed Miller
    Falls City, OR
    1993 Rocky Mountain Fusion
    2012 Fargo 2

  14. #14
    Senior Member kmv2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    My Bikes
    Bianchi circa late 1980s, Surly Cross Check, Kona Blast
    Posts
    695
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hard to judge based on a total lack of information. It's pretty clear that there is an overwhelming public perception of it being safer in a car than on a bike, at least in North America.

    Take for example a typical news article describing a bicycle accident. It will always mention whether the rider was wearing a helmet. Even if it doesn't even involve head injuries.
    Helmet or not, was the driver taking precautions? Where does it mention if the driver was wearing a seatbelt, did the airbag deploy?

    Car accidents involving death are also a side note, an afterthought. There was a little blurb on the radio a week ago after our long weekend. Statistics were read for the number of drivers caught speeding, driving drunk, texting, etc. then at the end "and 2 deaths from accidents".

    I don't think its about what mode is safer, I think looking at the effect is wrong. Look at the cause: what mode is injuring and killing the most people? That one is pretty clear, especially if you're an American child (#1 killer of children in USA is cars).

  15. #15
    Senior Member PatrickGSR94's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Memphis TN area
    Posts
    3,760
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Only 300 per year in a province of 4.4 million people?? Last year the state of Tennessee (which has almost 50% more people than BC at 6.45 million) surpassed 1,000 motoring crash deaths. Well over 350% more. Just shows how bad drivers are in this area of the country.
    2011 Felt Z85 105 | Ultegra | KMC | Selle Italia | Vuelta | Topeak
    90's-ish KHS Alite 1000 MTB, *hybridized*

  16. #16
    Senior Member Keith99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    5,732
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by delcrossv View Post
    I'd probably go with deaths/hour rather than deaths per mile.
    It depends on WHY one is cycling.

    If for transportation it is per mile and should be compared to the same miles for other modes being considered. If for recreation or athletic training then per hour seems a better measure.


    And on either it needs to be a comparison using the miles or hours the rider will be doing. And some of the time those answers are not to be found in statistics. Both bike paths and roads can vary by time. It does not matter to me if a road I ride on weekends is dangerous during rush hour or for that matter that a path I might ride during the week is a zoo on weekends.
    Perish any man who suspects that these men either did or suffered anything unseemly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •