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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ItsJustMe View Post
    Time of day restrictions. How can they tell me I can't ride my bike in the hour before I have to be to work, for instance?
    The GA law is talking about (optional) restrictions for a particular set of roadways ("those that are part of the state highway system"). That, presumably, is not all roads.

    Reserving the option of restricting bicyclists from certain roads is very common. (It's not all roads.)

    If they are allowed to restrict all use from a particular road, they certainly can have "time of day" restrictions.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 09-27-13 at 05:24 PM.

  2. #27
    PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes dynaryder's Avatar
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    I've always said that I'd have no problem registering my bikes and putting plates on them,provided that I then get treated properly by other road users. Also,since there's a way to identify the bike,I'd expect the police to step up in their efforts to recover stolen bicycles.

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  3. #28
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    The GA law is talking about (optional) restrictions for a particular set of roadways ("those that are part of the state highway system"). That, presumably, is not all roads.

    Reserving the option of restricting bicyclists from certain roads is very common. (It's not all roads.)

    If they are allowed to restrict all use from a particular road, they certainly can have "time of day" restrictions.
    They can only restrict access to roads if there is a reasonable alternative route. This is why in some western states bicycles are allowed on the expressway - it's really the only way to get from here to there.

    For instance, if I work on a given road, they really can't say I can't ride there. Likewise if there's a road that goes from one area to another and is 1 mile long, and the only other route is 3 miles long, that's not a reasonable alternative.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
    Many states place some restrictions on cycling on roads that are part of the "Interstate Highway System." I haven't encountered any prohibitions on cycling on state highways other than a few bridge crossings.
    Yeah, PA restricts it on limited access highways. If they banned it on all state highways, easily 50% of the roads around me would become off limits.

  5. #30
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    PA--when 322 got improved over 7 Mountains (southeast of State College) bikes and buggies got banned. There is no alternative route.

  6. #31
    Senior Member dynodonn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dynaryder View Post
    I've always said that I'd have no problem registering my bikes and putting plates on them,provided that I then get treated properly by other road users. Also,since there's a way to identify the bike,I'd expect the police to step up in their efforts to recover stolen bicycles.
    That's what serial numbers on bikes are for, no need in having to find a way to attach a piece of sheet metal to my bicycle. A voluntary sticker placed on the seat tube would work much better than sporting a mandatory metal license plate.
    As for some Georgia legislators, it appears that their hatred for cyclists knows no bounds.

  7. #32
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    As always, read http://www.toronto.ca/budget2005/pdf...censingcyc.PDF for a thorough demolition of such proposals

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ItsJustMe View Post
    They can only restrict access to roads if there is a reasonable alternative route. This is why in some western states bicycles are allowed on the expressway - it's really the only way to get from here to there.

    For instance, if I work on a given road, they really can't say I can't ride there. Likewise if there's a road that goes from one area to another and is 1 mile long, and the only other route is 3 miles long, that's not a reasonable alternative.
    Highly debatable.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    The GA law is talking about (optional) restrictions for a particular set of roadways ("those that are part of the state highway system"). That, presumably, is not all roads.

    Reserving the option of restricting bicyclists from certain roads is very common. (It's not all roads.)

    If they are allowed to restrict all use from a particular road, they certainly can have "time of day" restrictions.
    Oregon law explicitly gives jurisdictions that own roads the power to restrict the types of vehicles that can operate on them. For instance, a road could be restricted to only class A vehicles and bicycles. (That would work for me, since if I'm driving it's usually a class A rig.) I don't think this provision has ever been used for anything except restricting bikes from a handful of urban freeways and restricting bike paths to bikes and municipal vehicles, but it does allow for some interesting permutations.

    I never really thought of this law as a dangerous tool just waiting to be exploited by bike haters, but I can see where the good people of Georgia would be concerned.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
    Oregon law explicitly gives jurisdictions that own roads the power to restrict the types of vehicles that can operate on them. For instance, a road could be restricted to only class A vehicles and bicycles. (That would work for me, since if I'm driving it's usually a class A rig.) I don't think this provision has ever been used for anything except restricting bikes from a handful of urban freeways and restricting bike paths to bikes and municipal vehicles, but it does allow for some interesting permutations.

    I never really thought of this law as a dangerous tool just waiting to be exploited by bike haters, but I can see where the good people of Georgia would be concerned.
    The GA law, with the other stuff, is unusual.

    Some people here think the option of restrictions on state highways is unusual. That's incorrect.

    One person thinks that a restriction can't be made if it inconveniences even one person. That's incorrect too.

    Anyway, it's a proposed law and other people here seem to think it has no chance of becoming law.

  11. #36
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
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    Having a license on a bike is a whole can of worms. Are the police going to run in a four year old for not having a license or her little pink sidewalk bike? I think the police have far better things to do!!!!

  12. #37
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
    I told my friend that I wouldn't mind paying a registration tax as long as it was proportional to the vehicle weight, since wear on the road is proportional to weight. Sounds fair to me.
    I don't know about where you live, but here in Texas, vehicle registration costs are not proportional to weight unless you get over five tons --

    Here, all passenger vehicles and trucks under three tons pay a base fee of $51. Vehicles between three and five tons pay a base fee of $54.

    Motorcycles and mopeds pay $30.

    Presumably if bicycles were registered here and the current progression was continued, we'd probably pay around $20/year, not the pennies/year you think would be fair.

    since wear on the road is proportional to weight.
    1) if this is the case, then the weight of you plus your vehicle should be what's used, not just your vehicle's weight, and

    2) this isn't even remotely true -- it's worse. Road damage rises steeply with axle weight, and is estimated "as a rule of thumb... for reasonably strong pavement surfaces" to be proportional to the fourth power of the axle weight. This means that doubling the axle weight will increase road damage (2x2x2x2)=16 times..

    Of course, what this means is that in practice, bicycles, motorcycles and passenger vehicles do negligible amounts of damage to roads -- it's the large trucks that do it. But lighter vehicles do still clog the roads, and the weather still takes its toll, and the road still had to be built in the first place, so pretending that road fees should be based only on how much damage a vehicle does to the roads is shortsighted.

  13. #38
    Senior Member delcrossv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post

    Anyway, it's a proposed law and other people here seem to think it has no chance of becoming law.
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  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by delcrossv View Post


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henny_Penny

    Registering would be bad. I strongly doubt that would pass.
    The "peloton" thing is interesting. I'm surprised it's not illegal in more places.
    The "riding abreast" is very unusual.


    The "option for restrictions on state highways" is common. It's probably the case in your state but you aren't complaining about it! Why are you more concerned with proposed legislation (in some other state) than actual laws (in your own state)? And how do you propose non-GA residents whinging here is going to do anything useful? Bizarre.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 09-30-13 at 12:56 PM.

  15. #40
    Senior Member FenderTL5's Avatar
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    When I lived in Georgia the tag/registration was based on a percentage of the vehicle value (not weight).
    I don't know if it's still the same, that was almost 15 years ago.
    Nashville, like L.A. without a tan.

  16. #41
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FenderTL5 View Post
    When I lived in Georgia the tag/registration was based on a percentage of the vehicle value (not weight).
    I don't know if it's still the same, that was almost 15 years ago.
    It's easy enough to google for.

    This looks like Georgia's current fee schedule.

    Looks like passenger vehicles and motorcycles are both $20, and trailers are $12. Presumably if they were to start registering bicycles, the cost would also be $20 (if they kept with the current fee schedule, of course.)

  17. #42
    Administrator CbadRider's Avatar
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    Please don't resort to name-calling or insults. Anyone who does will be asked to leave the thread.

    Thanks for your cooperation with this.

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  18. #43
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    Riding abreast is not done much, but riding two abreast is legal in most states I think. It certainly is in Michigan. Most drivers think it's illegal though and aren't afraid to endanger your life to let you know what they think.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  19. #44
    Senior Member FenderTL5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougmc View Post
    It's easy enough to google for.

    This looks like Georgia's current fee schedule.

    Looks like passenger vehicles and motorcycles are both $20, and trailers are $12. Presumably if they were to start registering bicycles, the cost would also be $20 (if they kept with the current fee schedule, of course.)
    There's also an associated ad velorem that goes with it.

    What You Should Know:

    • If you own a passenger vehicle or motorcycle, annual registration costs $20. You'll also need to pay your vehicle's ad valorem tax, any fees for special tags, and the cost of an emissions inspection if you live in the metro Atlanta area.
    • An ad valorem tax is based on your car's current value. As your car's value decreases year after year, your ad valorem tax will decrease as well.Calculate your ad valorem tax.


    Nashville, like L.A. without a tan.

  20. #45
    rugged individualist wphamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougmc View Post
    I don't know about where you live, but here in Texas, vehicle registration costs are not proportional to weight unless you get over five tons --

    Here, all passenger vehicles and trucks under three tons pay a base fee of $51. Vehicles between three and five tons pay a base fee of $54.

    Motorcycles and mopeds pay $30.

    Presumably if bicycles were registered here and the current progression was continued, we'd probably pay around $20/year, not the pennies/year you think would be fair.

    1) if this is the case, then the weight of you plus your vehicle should be what's used, not just your vehicle's weight, and

    2) this isn't even remotely true -- it's worse. Road damage rises steeply with axle weight, and is estimated "as a rule of thumb... for reasonably strong pavement surfaces" to be proportional to the fourth power of the axle weight. This means that doubling the axle weight will increase road damage (2x2x2x2)=16 times..

    Of course, what this means is that in practice, bicycles, motorcycles and passenger vehicles do negligible amounts of damage to roads -- it's the large trucks that do it. But lighter vehicles do still clog the roads, and the weather still takes its toll, and the road still had to be built in the first place, so pretending that road fees should be based only on how much damage a vehicle does to the roads is shortsighted.
    Doug, most of that was already discussed. As mentioned earlier, while it is true that damage rises with the fourth power of axle weight I'll get all sorts of arguments about the pressure and small size of contact patch if I propose that ratio (some of which are valid btw) while if I just say "proportional" that seems reasonable.

    I said I wouldn't mind paying an amount proportional to weight. I didn't say we already did, although rates for larger vehicles are now tiered by weight.

    I said about a dollar, not pennies. As for the math, an average cyclist and bike at 180 pounds, divided by an average midsized car at 3500 pounds, times the fee of $20 equals one dollar and three cents. Pretty close to "a dollar" isn't it? If you do insist on the fourth power ratio, then it's not "pennies" - it's "fractions of a penny".

    Finally, these roads last many years without traffic, so weather is not that significant to the wear. Sure there are exceptions, such as rare floods and sinkholes, but for the vast majority of our roads it's almost all due to the traffic.

  21. #46
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
    Doug, most of that was already discussed. As mentioned earlier, while it is true that damage rises with the fourth power of axle weight I'll get all sorts of arguments about the pressure and small size of contact patch if I propose that ratio (some of which are valid btw) while if I just say "proportional" that seems reasonable.
    The problem is that "proportional" has a specific meaning -- it means to the first power. If you're using the word to explain a function that is actually to the fourth power, you're using the word incorrectly.

    The "to the fourth power" was well studied by smart people who put a lot of thought into it and looked at real world situations. The wikipedia article gives links if somebody wants to read the details.

    Really, the "to the fourth power" is just an estimate that attempts to cover a much more complicated situation. But certainly, it's nowhere near "to the first power".

    I said I wouldn't mind paying an amount proportional to weight.
    Specifically, you said vehicle weight. So if a 4000 lb car pays $50, a 20 bike would pay $0.25, hence my "pennies" comment. Of course, if a 4000 lb car pays $100, and you've got a 40 lb bike -- that's one hundred pennies that the bike would be charged.

    If you add in the operator weight and have 200 lbs of bicycle+cyclist vs. 4200 lbs of car -- it's a good deal more than a dollar.

    I said about a dollar, not pennies. As for the math, an average cyclist and bike at 180 pounds, divided by an average midsized car at 3500 pounds, times the fee of $20 equals one dollar and three cents. Pretty close to "a dollar" isn't it? If you do insist on the fourth power ratio, then it's not "pennies" - it's "fractions of a penny".
    Actually, I explicitly said that charging vehicles based on the damage they do to the road would be shortsighted, so that's exactly what I'd not insist on.

    Finally, these roads last many years without traffic, so weather is not that significant to the wear. Sure there are exceptions, such as rare floods and sinkholes, but for the vast majority of our roads it's almost all due to the traffic.
    Weather (and mother nature in general) *is* significant. MUPs never carry heavy motor vehicles, but the still need maintenance. You don't think it's because the bikes and pedestrians are damaging them, do you?

    And thanks to the fourth power thing, it's not just "the traffic" that does it, but the heavy trucks. Passenger cars do negligible amounts of damage to roads -- they just don't weigh enough. (And of course bikes do even less.) But if the traffic is 90% passenger cars, they ought to be covering 90% of the initial construction and weather related maintenance, whatever their weight is. (And if their traffic related maintenance was significant, they should pay their portion of that, but it's insignificant, so no point in doing so.) And by that metric, if a system is set up to charge bicycles for use of the road, they ought to pay a figure based on how much of the total traffic they are, divided by each bike. Which would be difficult to measure.

    Considering that bicycles are largely considered "toys", and yet the governments generally try to encourage their use (and yes, this is sort of a paradox) -- it's probably better just to leave things as-is and not tax bicycles more than they already are (sales tax mostly.)

  22. #47
    rugged individualist wphamilton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougmc View Post
    The problem is that "proportional" has a specific meaning -- it means to the first power. If you're using the word to explain a function that is actually to the fourth power, you're using the word incorrectly.

    The "to the fourth power" was well studied by smart people who put a lot of thought into it and looked at real world situations. The wikipedia article gives links if somebody wants to read the details.

    Actually it's an empirical result not a theoretical one, and to be honest might not apply to pedestrian or cyclist weights. Not that it's important to the discussion either way.

  23. #48
    Senior Member MikeM21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matariki View Post
    Interesting that this requirement does not apply to mopeds.



    4"x7" plate? Wow! I'd mount it so it sticks out from my left handlebar.

    Mr. Rogers looks like he needs to spend some time on a bike.

    Also: What would they do about riders from other states? If passed into law, I wouldn't mind taking the bike down to GA to "pass through". "Sorry Officer, I'm from North Carolina and don't need a license".
    The Moped lobby in GA must be stroooong!!
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  24. #49
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    If we're getting into the weight thing, you shouldn't include the weight of the rider, unless each family pays proportionately to the number of family members and their combined weight. Which, bearing in mind that many drivers are twice the weight of their cycling equivalent

  25. #50
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
    Actually it's an empirical result not a theoretical one, and to be honest might not apply to pedestrian or cyclist weights.
    I did cover the empirical result part in the very next paragraph -- Really, the "to the fourth power" is just an estimate that attempts to cover a much more complicated situation. But certainly, it's nowhere near "to the first power".

    Not that it's important to the discussion either way.
    If one believes that a motor vehicle or bicycle does or should pay a fee proportional to or related to the damage they cause to the roads, it's quite important to the discussion.

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