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  1. #26
    Senior Member dougmc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dajjorg View Post
    You've alluded to these local cycling advocacy groups twice now. Where can I find a list of them, or find which one is closest/most prominent in my area (New Brunswick, NJ 08901)?
    I don't know that there's a master list out there -- I know there's several here in Austin, but don't know anything about New Brunswick. That said, I can google ...

    Some places to start looking would seem to be --

    http://walkbikejersey.blogspot.com/
    http://www.newjerseybikewalk.org/
    http://njbikeped.org/nj-bpac/
    http://www.nj.gov/transportation/com...ike/links.shtm
    or just ask at your local bikeshop.

    Usually there's somebody who makes a summary of the relevant laws that cyclists need to know. (For the most part, the laws are the same as what you have to obey in a car, but there's usually some key differences, and those differences tend to vary from state to state.)

    I don't know where that would be for New Jersey, but it should be findable with some googling.

  2. #27
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    The New Jersey state code is here:
    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/njcode/

    In general, in the case of both cars and bicycles, the big pieces are the same from state to state. Drive on the right side of the road, don't cross double-yellow lines, stop at red lights, the vehicle to the right at a 4-way stop has the right-of-way, etc. But the small details differ. Idaho has the most bicycle-friendly traffic laws (a model, IMHO, which all states should adopt). I doubt anyone ever has compiled a master list, and even if they did, it certainly wouldn't be in "plain English," because the legal-eze is one of the profession's sources of job security.

    If you had been injured, or suffered any property damage, your best bet would have been to contact a personal injury litigation specialist. In the eyes of the law, both your bicycle and you well-being are "a thing" and have intrinsic values. If your bicycle is damaged, they can cause the guilty party to pay the cost of the repairs. But as for bodily injury, the law acknowledges that it lacks the power to relive pain or heal injury, so it proposes instead to compensate you with money.

    The personal injury litigation industry runs on contingency cases. The lawyer agrees to take the case in return for a percentage of any settlement you might receive (his expenses always come off the top). They basically are playing the odds that they can wrangle an out-of-court settlement for a tidy profit without having to invest the time and other assets to prepare for a jury trial. These guys will not charge you for the initial interview, and do not turn up their nose at a potential client (unless and until they have reason to believe you're a crackpot or have absolutely no legitimate case).

  3. #28
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by NattyBumpo View Post
    The personal injury litigation industry runs on contingency cases. The lawyer agrees to take the case in return for a percentage of any settlement you might receive (his expenses always come off the top). They basically are playing the odds that they can wrangle an out-of-court settlement for a tidy profit without having to invest the time and other assets to prepare for a jury trial. These guys will not charge you for the initial interview, and do not turn up their nose at a potential client (unless and until they have reason to believe you're a crackpot or have absolutely no legitimate case).
    Just to clarify a bit here, in a contingency situation, expenses are always payable, whether or not there's recovery. So, yes, if you won your case, they'd come off the top, but if you lost, you'd still be responsible for them.

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