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-   -   Parking: The key to motorist acceptance (http://www.bikeforums.net/advocacy-safety/926874-parking-key-motorist-acceptance.html)

mr_bill 12-28-13 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16364105)
.... Or, as is being done in some cities, reserve sections of on street curb space for bicycle only parking?

Yeah, you are right. That never works.

(FWIW, the businesses nearby pretty much *DEMAND* that these be re-installed.)

-mr. bill

dynodonn 12-28-13 01:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16364105)
OK so then what do we print on the T-shirt when the city council eliminates street parking to make room for a bike lane? Or, as is being done in some cities, reserve sections of on street curb space for bicycle only parking?

Cities in my locale won't let their business district on street automobile parking spots slip away, if cycling infrastructure is installed, DZBLs are generally the order of the day in those locations.

Wanderer 12-28-13 01:38 PM

FB, you are right about live and let live.

It never hurts to take the lane when you need it, but give it when you don't.

It's also nice to wave someone by, if you can, even if there isn't "enuf" room.

Pick and choose, and don't forget to wave. Smiles are the usual result!

genec 12-28-13 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dynodonn (Post 16364141)
... how about putting "One Less Car" on the front, and "One More Empty Parking Spot For You" on the back.

That works too.

genec 12-28-13 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16364105)
OK so then what do we print on the T-shirt when the city council eliminates street parking to make room for a bike lane? Or, as is being done in some cities, reserve sections of on street curb space for bicycle only parking?

Stick with the shirt as is or with One Less Car... the overall result is that one more bike rider STILL means one more parking space for a driver somewhere.

spdntrxi 12-28-13 03:23 PM

sorry.. unless that open space is next to a bike rack full of bikes… I won't connect the two.

hotbike 12-28-13 03:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 16346297)
I take a different tack. I simply don't recognize any car vs. bike debate. I neither lecture others nor feel compelled to justify my choice. It's not about cars vs bikes, since our needs are actually pretty aligned. We both want to get where we're going safely and conveniently and neither has to have a negative impact on the other.

There's plenty of road out there, so if it comes up I focus on sharing and mutual respect.

That I agree with. Furthermore, I think it behooves every cyclist to get a rear-view mirror… Don't let a motorist startle you. A startled cyclist often escalates into rage.

Carusoswi 12-30-13 03:06 AM

I don't cycle as much as I once did - work demands, etc. have curtailed the time I have to spend on the bike. I never commuted, but used to ride a good 3-4k miles per year. I feel it a bit presumptuous to conclude that riding, when in lieu of driving, has any appreciable effect on the cost of gasoline. It makes sense to conclude that there is an impact on the use/non-use of fuel, but the cost of that fuel does not bear a direct correlation to the use of or demand for same.

I remember periods in my community where there were public drives to reduce the use of electrical power. Surprisingly, the cost of power rose in response to our successful efforts to reduce consumption - the reason? The reduced usage, according to the local utilities, dimished their economy of scale, thus forcing them to charge more to supply less electricity.

To this day, I am not certain I buy the explanation, but, whatever the reason, power costs per unit of power increased, and that increase remains in effect today.

Anyone who consumes fuel to power a vehicle is aware that any natural or political event perceived to threaten supply will result in almost instantaneous rise in the cost of supplying fuel. Relaxation of those increases, if they occur at all, generally come at a much slower pace, and, generally, do not match the level of original increase.

I sadly conclude that, if cycling resulted in x% decrease in the use of fuel, the cost per unit of fuel would raise by at least an amount sufficient to offset the revenue lost to the suppliers of that fuel as a result of the decreased demand, said conclusion based upon my lifelong observation of this issue.

If you are inspired to ride more due to an opposing opinion, then that is a win for you, no real loss to society. Keep on keeping on, but, in terms of having an impact on the never ending battle to reduce the use of fossil fuel, you are jousting at windmills.

Just sayin', and I regret that I don't ride as much as I used to ride.

As for the parking issue, my encounters while riding (and parking) have more often involved some "motorized" person claiming that I should not share his/her space or take my own, owing to the fact that he/she pays road and fuel taxes, and I don't. Most of those situations have been diffused by my display of my drivers license and explaining that, as the owner of a car, I, too, pay the same taxes. This may or may not be true for those of you for whom cycling is your main mode of transportation. Of course, if you never make use of a motor vehicle, you might naturally counter that your use has little, if any, negative impact upon those roadways of which you make use. The motorist will not likely buy that argument, but it is true.

This was an interesting thread that I enjoyed reading. I apologize for the long post. Happy cycling, all.

Caruso


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