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  1. #1
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    Bike use skyrocketing among the old

    "More than a third of the national increase in biking is coming from people between the ages of 60 and 79, an analysis of federal data shows."

    Read the full article:
    Bike use is rising among the young, but it is skyrocketing among the old | PeopleForBikes

  2. #2
    Senior Member RideMyWheel's Avatar
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    This under-30 crowd scares the crap out of me. They want the entire country riding bikes and going green, but it doesn't look like they're very good at practicing what they preach. They're also the ones who will be paying into SS and Medicare when I'm drawing out of it. Thus far I'm not impressed with their work ethic and earning potential.

    And Heaven help us if we get into a war--if it's drone-warfare we might be okay, but if it's boots on the ground we can forget it. These kids won't get off the couch except to stuff their faces. All they know is video games. I hope our gamers are better than the Russians or the Chinese.

    Crap. I sound like my grandfather.

  3. #3
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    Confirms what I have been observing.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Actually it's not their fault. Education has gotten too expensive and too many 20 to 30 year olds are carrying far too much debt. There is a reason why the formation of new households is down; this demographic can't afford to start out life.

  5. #5
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    And your grandfather's grandfather, and your grandfather's grandfather's grandfather...

    They'll be fine. I remember my great-aunt telling us that her father thought her generation was going to be the end of us all because of the jitterbug. Somehow, every new generation seems to pull it together in spite of the example we've set for them and the helpful advice we so generously give to them.

  6. #6
    Disco Infiltrator Darth Lefty's Avatar
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    Is this old people who are starting to ride, or riders who are becoming old?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideMyWheel View Post
    This under-30 crowd scares the crap out of me. They want the entire country riding bikes and going green, but it doesn't look like they're very good at practicing what they preach. They're also the ones who will be paying into SS and Medicare when I'm drawing out of it. Thus far I'm not impressed with their work ethic and earning potential.

    And Heaven help us if we get into a war--if it's drone-warfare we might be okay, but if it's boots on the ground we can forget it. These kids won't get off the couch except to stuff their faces. All they know is video games. I hope our gamers are better than the Russians or the Chinese.

    Crap. I sound like my grandfather.
    Nah, you sound like someone who's parroting stereotypes and doesn't actually know or work with anyone in that age group. They're fine people.

  8. #8
    Senior Member RideMyWheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
    Nah, you sound like someone who's parroting stereotypes and doesn't actually know or work with anyone in that age group. They're fine people.
    I hope that you are right. I want and need to be wrong, but my observations about my own generation have proven to be true--for the most part we are materialistic, spoiled drug addicts with no concept of the value of a dollar. You have us to thank for the 2008 real estate bubble. I have seen no evidence that this generation will somehow do better.

    stereotype: a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing.

    the CDC has something different to say about childhood obesity statistics over the past 30 years. They've even lowered the standards to let more kids off the hook.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideMyWheel View Post
    Crap. I sound like my grandfather.
    Quote Originally Posted by Camilo View Post
    Nah, you sound like someone who's parroting stereotypes and doesn't actually know or work with anyone in that age group. They're fine people.
    I agree with Camilo. The Millennials that I have worked with are just head and shoulders above every other generation that I have lived amongst. These young people have been handed a broken environment (with horrific prospects), a busted economy, expensive education (where we all had near-free universities) and, worst of all, terrifying STDs. What do they do? Many of the ones I know have taught themselves to program computers, learned several foreign languages, become incredibly knowledgeable about history and somehow manage to work more hours than I ever would have at their age. The best part is that they have enormous ability to work in community settings, largely because they are the least selfish generation we've had in a long time. It looks like al they need is for us oldsters to get out of the way.

  10. #10
    Senior Member RideMyWheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
    I agree with Camilo.
    Here's something else my generation has done--created a world where as children the millennials were in more danger of being abducted and sexually molested. No wonder their parents don't let them leave the house. When I was a kid I was outside roaming from dawn until after dark, all summer long. No fear.

    EDIT: to clarify things here, I am not blaming this generation for their shortcomings, whatever they may be. I blame us.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Mr. Hairy Legs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Quiet One View Post
    And your grandfather's grandfather, and your grandfather's grandfather's grandfather...

    They'll be fine. I remember my great-aunt telling us that her father thought her generation was going to be the end of us all because of the jitterbug. Somehow, every new generation seems to pull it together in spite of the example we've set for them and the helpful advice we so generously give to them.
    Jitterbug... Tss... Tss... Tss.. Jitterbug... Tss... Tss... Tss...

    I agree, it seems everybody is growing up later now, not leaving home till 30, buying a house at 40 etc... but they're still figuring it out. The retirement age is going to have to go up soon.

  12. #12
    Senior Member trailangel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Is this old people who are starting to ride, or riders who are becoming old?
    You are right!
    I think it's riders who were in the bike-boom of the 70's now getting old and we are still riding.
    What else can I do?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideMyWheel View Post
    This under-30 crowd scares the crap out of me. They want the entire country riding bikes and going green, but it doesn't look like they're very good at practicing what they preach. They're also the ones who will be paying into SS and Medicare when I'm drawing out of it. Thus far I'm not impressed with their work ethic and earning potential.

    And Heaven help us if we get into a war--if it's drone-warfare we might be okay, but if it's boots on the ground we can forget it. These kids won't get off the couch except to stuff their faces. All they know is video games. I hope our gamers are better than the Russians or the Chinese.

    Crap. I sound like my grandfather.
    Nice job going entirely off-topic with a flame-worthy statement. Enjoy your SS, it won't be there by the time I sound like you and your grandfather. What's the cut-off anyways? I'm 34, so I'm not part of the couch-generation? I must be since I'm currently unemployed (I assure you it has nothing to do with work ethic or lack thereof). I'm also a vet with six years of service working in a Navy nuclear plant, fwiw. I didn't care to waste over a year of my life just sitting in the Persian Gulf, but I guess that isn't boots on the ground. On a side note, my service also delayed my joining the rest of my age group in finding a place in the world, I went back to school along with these millennials, so I identify with them more than gen-x, especially in regards to the current economy and lack of jobs.

    Quote Originally Posted by RideMyWheel View Post
    EDIT: to clarify things here, I am not blaming this generation for their shortcomings, whatever they may be. I blame us.
    Fair enough... and the generation before that, and the one for that. So, you're still around, find a way to start making a difference or else you are just passing it on to the next generation. You and I, we both have a lot of work to do to right this ship.

    Back on topic, it seems to me that the current generation reaching retirement years is also the generation that was buying bikes during the bike-boom in the 70's... so there's that. It doesn't hurt that a lot of communities have some nice cycling infrastructure in the form or rail trails and urban bike routes. We've got a long way to go with said infrastructure, but I know that the 30mile trail near my parents gets a lot of people back on bikes, which is really nice to see.
    Last edited by headloss; 06-21-14 at 01:25 PM.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailangel View Post
    You are right!
    I think it's riders who were in the bike-boom of the 70's now getting old and we are still riding.
    What else can I do?
    Keep riding! Leadership by example. Riding is become a normal thing with the kids now growing up... just imagine how many cyclists will be out there when they reach retirement age! Ride with your grand kids! Find a charity that teaches kids to ride bikes and donate some time! Be a big-brother/big-sister! Collect bikes for under-privileged kids! I've seen lots of great programs that promote cycling.

  15. #15
    Senior Member CrankyOne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Is this old people who are starting to ride, or riders who are becoming old?
    A bit of both. People at retirement age now have ridden considerably more as adults than their parents. There are a gob of older folks getting in to it seriously for the first time since they were kids. Health and enjoyment seem to top the list. Some have become a bit energy conscious and cost savings figure in as well. Some also say that they think it's safer for them to ride bicycles to their morning coffee klatch than to drive. Any way you look at it, it's good to see them out there.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    I agree with the OP, the vast majority of regular riders in my area, are 50 + years of age, likely over 60

  17. #17
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    Maybe it's a question of affordability and or time, the young I know are working long hours.

  18. #18
    Senior Member RideMyWheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by headloss View Post
    Nice job ...
    I'm glad that you read my follow ups, I was even editing and censuring myself in the first post when I said I sounded like my grandfather. Seriously, the obesity numbers do not lie, and the number of parents of millenials I personally know who continue to support their children into their 30's is astounding.

    35 is their new 21. They're still finding themselves.

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    I can think of several possible factors. One is that, in the 1950s and 1960s, bikes were seen primarily as practical transportation, not as exercise or sport. Many of us started as paper boys riding with shoulder bags so heavy we could scarcely walk. We all rode to school, as a matter of course. We rode everywhere until we turned 16, then started again when attending college, because students were not allowed to have cars. In graduate or professional school, we had cars, but there was no student parking within a half mile of the department. The result was that cycling was natural to us -- not a statement, not a green thing, not exercise. In some ways, we were like today's Dutch.

  20. #20
    Senior Member rydabent's Avatar
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    When I am on my bent, and especially on my trike, I am stopped by a lot of older people and asked questions. They realize that on a trike all the problems of balance and stopping are eliminated. The discussion also goes to the fact that a trike wont beat up their feet and knees like running. And of coures there is the fun factor, and a trike goes much futher in a given amount of time than walking. That gives one a lot more scenery to see.

    I am stopped so much that I have taken to carrying the business cards of the local bent LBS.

  21. #21
    Been Around Awhile I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1nterceptor View Post
    "More than a third of the national increase in biking is coming from people between the ages of 60 and 79, an analysis of federal data shows."

    Read the full article:
    Bike use is rising among the young, but it is skyrocketing among the old | PeopleForBikes
    I read the article. My take: the percentage of U.S. people riding bicycles (as measured by "share of all trips") rose from not even infinitesimal to almost infinitesimal. No different for old people, no matter how age is measured. The total numbers are tiny.

  22. #22
    elcraft
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    Quote Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
    I agree with Camilo. The Millennials that I have worked with are just head and shoulders above every other generation that I have lived amongst. These young people have been handed a broken environment (with horrific prospects), a busted economy, expensive education (where we all had near-free universities) and, worst of all, terrifying STDs. What do they do? Many of the ones I know have taught themselves to program computers, learned several foreign languages, become incredibly knowledgeable about history and somehow manage to work more hours than I ever would have at their age. The best part is that they have enormous ability to work in community settings, largely because they are the least selfish generation we've had in a long time. It looks like al they need is for us oldsters to get out of the way.
    While I am not a Millennial, I sympathize with their plight. If you are looking to blame someone for their supposed poor work ethic, then look at the manufacturers and employers for off-shoriing jobs for no other reason than higher profit w/ ever lower costs. There used to be a social contract of sorts between the employed and the employers. It was a civic duty to create work and prosperity. Now, it is considered poor business practice to worry about the common weal instead of maximizing quarterly profits for Wall Street. The value of a Bachelor's Degree has been so debased that is only valued as the vehicle that places you in your graduate specialty program. All to to the tune of a minimum of $20,000 per year. It costs significantly more to qualify to be exploited and underpaid.
    It s not the Millennials that are the problem, but the greed and selfishness of the Boomers who run things now.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by elcraft View Post
    While I am not a Millennial, I sympathize with their plight. If you are looking to blame someone for their supposed poor work ethic, then look at the manufacturers and employers for off-shoriing jobs for no other reason than higher profit w/ ever lower costs. There used to be a social contract of sorts between the employed and the employers. It was a civic duty to create work and prosperity. Now, it is considered poor business practice to worry about the common weal instead of maximizing quarterly profits for Wall Street. The value of a Bachelor's Degree has been so debased that is only valued as the vehicle that places you in your graduate specialty program. All to to the tune of a minimum of $20,000 per year. It costs significantly more to qualify to be exploited and underpaid.
    It s not the Millennials that are the problem, but the greed and selfishness of the Boomers who run things now.
    You're forgetting two important things, profit margins have remained fairly constant for most industries over the years, and everything is driven by consumer demand. Its everyone's fault, anyone pointing a finger or playing victim is a hypocrite.

    Every generation learns form the mistakes of their predecessors, but will certainly make their own too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RideMyWheel View Post
    Here's something else my generation has done--created a world where as children the millennials were in more danger of being abducted and sexually molested. No wonder their parents don't let them leave the house. When I was a kid I was outside roaming from dawn until after dark, all summer long. No fear.
    The only thing that changed was fear. The danger did not increase. The 24 hour news cycle has made everyone fearful while crime overall has decreased and abduction and molestation have not increased.

  25. #25
    Senior Member blacksapphire08's Avatar
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    It does seem like most of the riders in my area are quite old (retired). Im 28 and started biking again because its inexpensive, fun, and counts for exercise.

    I have to agree with headloss that our generation is basically buried under a huge pile of debt, mine is entirely from college. I would love to buy a house someday but trying to get a job that pays decently is tough.

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