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Beach Cruisers Do you love balloon tires and fenders? Do you love riding the simplicity of a single gear and coaster brakes or a single gear cluster? Do you love the classic curves in the tubing of a cruiser that takes you back to the 1950's and 1960's, stylistically? Here's your home! Welcome to the Beach Cruisers and Cruisers forum!

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Old 07-12-17, 07:44 PM   #1
VaBeachTennis
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'New' Cruiser

My neighbor threw this bike away when he moved out, does anyone have an idea what brand this bicycle is? It has a Schwinn seat and Schwinn tires that say Schwinn Typhoon, I don't see a serial number on the bottom of the bottom bracket. I think it is one of those Walmart brands. I am pretty sure that there is sound coming from the coaster brake hub, it almost at times sounds like a bottom bracket problem but if I stop pedaling the sound from the rear is still there. It glides nicely and I rode it for 15 miles, I also noticed that the brace that secures the coaster brake is a little loose but I held my finger on it and the sounds were still there. Any suggestions, has anyone come across this before? Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-13-17, 05:04 AM   #2
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What sort of noise is it that you think is coming from the rear hub? I've heard bottom brackets make all kinds of noises so that isn't very helpful. How far does the crank have to turn when transitioning from 'drive' to 'brake'? Have you removed the rear wheel to feel if the axle is loose or binding within the hub?
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Old 07-13-17, 09:02 AM   #3
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It's a modern era Chinese Schwinn. A perfectly fine bike if taken care of properly. I've had one for over 15 trouble free years.

The reaction arm must be 100% immobilized. The strap must fit the frame tightly, with no play, and the arm must be securely tightened to the strap. If it is allowed to move, even a little, the parts inside attempt to unscrew themselves. This will have negative affects on braking and prevent a bearing adjustment from holding.

Are you mechanical? Do you have tools? Coaster brake hubs and Ashtabula one piece cranks/bottom brackets are quite simple. If I came across a bike like that where it's maintenance history is unknown, I'd do a full service on the rear hub, bottom bracket and head set just for peace of mind and a known fresh start.
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Old 07-13-17, 01:03 PM   #4
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What sort of noise is it that you think is coming from the rear hub? I've heard bottom brackets make all kinds of noises so that isn't very helpful. How far does the crank have to turn when transitioning from 'drive' to 'brake'? Have you removed the rear wheel to feel if the axle is loose or binding within the hub?
It's a clicking noise, I initially thought that it was a bottom bracket or pedal issue but I stopped pedaling when i heard the sound and it still made that clicking sound. It initially had some "give" , I attributed it to a loose chain and that solved that problem. Now the brake response is nice. I am going to remove the rear wheel in a few hours and check it out. Thank you for the advice and questions.
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Old 07-13-17, 01:42 PM   #5
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It's a modern era Chinese Schwinn. A perfectly fine bike if taken care of properly. I've had one for over 15 trouble free years.

The reaction arm must be 100% immobilized. The strap must fit the frame tightly, with no play, and the arm must be securely tightened to the strap. If it is allowed to move, even a little, the parts inside attempt to unscrew themselves. This will have negative affects on braking and prevent a bearing adjustment from holding.

Are you mechanical? Do you have tools? Coaster brake hubs and Ashtabula one piece cranks/bottom brackets are quite simple. If I came across a bike like that where it's maintenance history is unknown, I'd do a full service on the rear hub, bottom bracket and head set just for peace of mind and a known fresh start.
Thank you, I was trying to find out the model so I could see what component parts (crank, rear hub, etc.)it has. It's a very nice bike, I don't know why he would just throw it away just because he bought a new bike, but thanks to him! It was a little neglected but 40 minutes later she was ready to ride.

There is some slack with the reaction arm, it looks stock to me and the strap is tightened all of the way. The nut inside of the frame and outside of the reaction arm was loose enough to turn by hand. I just checked it out right now and I will take the wheel off and inspect it.

I'm ok mechanically, it's been a long time since I had experience with single speed with the action arms. I more used to road bikes and mountain bikes. That's a great idea to do a full service on this bike. I put 15 plus miles on it yesterday and it was a nice fun change from my road bikes. Now I have to learn how to service Coaster brake hubs.

Thanks for the great advice.
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Old 07-13-17, 01:43 PM   #6
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Thank you both for the excellent advice!
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Old 07-13-17, 02:57 PM   #7
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Thank you, I was trying to find out the model so I could see what component parts (crank, rear hub, etc.)it has. It's a very nice bike, I don't know why he would just throw it away just because he bought a new bike, but thanks to him! It was a little neglected but 40 minutes later she was ready to ride.

There is some slack with the reaction arm, it looks stock to me and the strap is tightened all of the way. The nut inside of the frame and outside of the reaction arm was loose enough to turn by hand. I just checked it out right now and I will take the wheel off and inspect it.

I'm ok mechanically, it's been a long time since I had experience with single speed with the action arms. I more used to road bikes and mountain bikes. That's a great idea to do a full service on this bike. I put 15 plus miles on it yesterday and it was a nice fun change from my road bikes. Now I have to learn how to service Coaster brake hubs.

Thanks for the great advice.

It probably has a Shimano CB-E110. Coaster brakes can be funky to disassemble and reassemble if you go at it the wrong way. And often people will attack it from the wrong end because the correct end is counter intuitive. If you know a few tricks it's easier than tying your shoelace. If you run into any snags or hiccups along the way, shoot me a PM and I'll run you through it.

Be careful with youtube videos. There are many that do it the hard way. It gets done, but their methods are clumsy, redundant, messy and time consuming.

Also, and this is critical, do something to completely immobilize the strap. That small amount of up and down motion repeats itself every time you transition from accelerating to braking and vice versa. Every time. That's what caused that big nut to work itself free. Make a shim out of soda can or whatever it takes so there is no slop between the strap and the chain stay. Or you can measure the diameter of your chain stay and buy a snazzy new Sturmy Archer strap in the right size for just a few bucks. And get your self a bigger replacement bolt for the strap if there is slop between the bolt and the strap/arm hole. You want that bolt to be snug in the hole.
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Old 07-14-17, 05:07 AM   #8
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... Also, and this is critical, do something to completely immobilize the strap. That small amount of up and down motion repeats itself every time you transition from accelerating to braking and vice versa. Every time. That's what caused that big nut to work itself free. Make a shim out of soda can or whatever it takes so there is no slop between the strap and the chain stay. Or you can measure the diameter of your chain stay and buy a snazzy new Sturmy Archer strap in the right size for just a few bucks. And get your self a bigger replacement bolt for the strap if there is slop between the bolt and the strap/arm hole. You want that bolt to be snug in the hole.
Bah, a length of bailing twine and a pretty box knot should do the trick... maybe even a trash bag twist-tie.
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Old 07-14-17, 07:31 AM   #9
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Bah, a length of bailing twine and a pretty box knot should do the trick... maybe even a trash bag twist-tie.
Like I said........."Or whatever it takes"
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Old 07-14-17, 09:08 AM   #10
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Bah, a length of bailing twine and a pretty box knot should do the trick... maybe even a trash bag twist-tie.


we did the piece of coat hanger thing as kids.
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Old 07-14-17, 10:26 AM   #11
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It probably has a Shimano CB-E110. Coaster brakes can be funky to disassemble and reassemble if you go at it the wrong way. And often people will attack it from the wrong end because the correct end is counter intuitive. If you know a few tricks it's easier than tying your shoelace. If you run into any snags or hiccups along the way, shoot me a PM and I'll run you through it.

Be careful with youtube videos. There are many that do it the hard way. It gets done, but their methods are clumsy, redundant, messy and time consuming.

Also, and this is critical, do something to completely immobilize the strap. That small amount of up and down motion repeats itself every time you transition from accelerating to braking and vice versa. Every time. That's what caused that big nut to work itself free. Make a shim out of soda can or whatever it takes so there is no slop between the strap and the chain stay. Or you can measure the diameter of your chain stay and buy a snazzy new Sturmy Archer strap in the right size for just a few bucks. And get your self a bigger replacement bolt for the strap if there is slop between the bolt and the strap/arm hole. You want that bolt to be snug in the hole.
Thanks for the i9nformation. What is the correct end to start with, the sprocket side? I do hear a lot of noise coming from the brake side, I secured the strap with a shim that is tight. It sounds like brake pads are loose and moving around inside the hub. It's my day off, I'm going to have a burger and beer and then work on that wheel. I was looking for Cruiser wheels for sale on Craigslist in case I mess the wheel up, no luck but I found a complete Cruiser and a thrift store for $20 bucks. It's an old Murray Monterray. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 07-14-17, 10:52 AM   #12
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Thanks for the i9nformation. What is the correct end to start with, the sprocket side? I do hear a lot of noise coming from the brake side, I secured the strap with a shim that is tight. It sounds like brake pads are loose and moving around inside the hub. It's my day off, I'm going to have a burger and beer and then work on that wheel. I was looking for Cruiser wheels for sale on Craigslist in case I mess the wheel up, no luck but I found a complete Cruiser and a thrift store for $20 bucks. It's an old Murray Monterray. Thanks for the advice!
Look on the reaction arm to identify the hub. It should be clearly stamped with the brand and model number. I can provide a detailed drawing if it's a Shimano. Then when I explain which pieces to leave assembled it'll be easier for both of us and more clear for you. Yes, disassembly begins on the drive side, but the guts are removed from the non drive side.

I'd bet that the hub is not damaged. But if it is, replacing the entire thing with a brand new one is around $20.00.
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Old 07-14-17, 04:33 PM   #13
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Look on the reaction arm to identify the hub. It should be clearly stamped with the brand and model number. I can provide a detailed drawing if it's a Shimano. Then when I explain which pieces to leave assembled it'll be easier for both of us and more clear for you. Yes, disassembly begins on the drive side, but the guts are removed from the non drive side.

I'd bet that the hub is not damaged. But if it is, replacing the entire thing with a brand new one is around $20.00.
That's good to know!
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Old 07-17-17, 04:53 AM   #14
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we did the piece of coat hanger thing as kids.
It's amazing the things we did as kids yet survived into adulthood. How many of us had pedals that we let fall apart until there was only a spindle left that we'd gouge our ankles on?

What I like to use now are PVC strips cut from thin walled 4" household drain pipe. You can warm it up in the oven at about 190F at which temp it becomes soft and pliable. Form it around the chainstay and you end up with a nice strong form-fitting brake band that doesn't mar the paint.

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Old 07-17-17, 12:09 PM   #15
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It's amazing the things we did as kids yet survived into adulthood. How many of us had pedals that we let fall apart until there was only a spindle left that we'd gouge our ankles on?

What I like to use now are PVC strips cut from thin walled 4" household drain pipe. You can warm it up in the oven at about 190F at which temp it becomes soft and pliable. Form it around the chainstay and you end up with a nice strong form-fitting brake band that doesn't mar the paint.

I use clear helicopter tape. It's tough and stays put. It's thick and you can apply as many layers as needed to crate the perfect diameter for the strap to bite. It protects the paint and it's clear so you don't notice it unless you look for it. And the paint is protected when you slide the strap forward or backward.

I remember riding on just pedal spindles too. Barefoot. What were we thinking?
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