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Beach Cruisers Do you love balloon tires and fenders? Do you love riding the simplicity of a single gear and coaster brakes or a single gear cluster? Do you love the classic curves in the tubing of a cruiser that takes you back to the 1950's and 1960's, stylistically? Here's your home! Welcome to the Beach Cruisers and Cruisers forum!

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Old 05-24-13, 05:50 PM   #1
cyclist2000
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Lightweight Cruisers?

Are there any lightweight cruisers. My daughter has a Bianchi Milano and I am looking for something similar but I don't think they make that model any more. Any suggestions.
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Old 05-25-13, 10:48 AM   #2
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There are many cruiser today made with aluminum frames so the overall weight is really a lot less than a steel frame so look for one of those.
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Old 05-25-13, 11:42 AM   #3
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There are custom builders using Titanium, to build cruiser frames..
if your budget is bug enough .

+1 there are new bikes cruiser style fabricated from aluminum..

LBS here sells a few brands.. rents them too..
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Old 05-28-13, 10:10 AM   #4
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Electra have a lot of light weight aluminum cruisers in there line.
http://www.electrabike.com/Bikes/cruiser-bikes-electra
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Old 06-04-13, 11:24 PM   #5
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Nirve has quality aluminum frame cruisers...
http://www.nirve.com/default.asp
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Old 08-01-13, 08:22 AM   #6
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Define lightweight, I'm at 25lbs with this aluminum frame, decent spec MTB parts. I'll weigh a basic single speed Electra today and report back.


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Old 08-01-13, 06:20 PM   #7
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it's a cheapie, but one of the lightest things i've hefted (no scale, just picking it up for a feel of the weight) are those next la jolla's.
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Old 08-02-13, 07:52 AM   #8
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A single speed ladies steel Electra is 36lbs, same as the aluminum bike equipped with 3 speed and fenders.

Last edited by Saddle Up; 08-02-13 at 07:56 AM.
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Old 08-02-13, 11:32 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
Are there any lightweight cruisers. My daughter has a Bianchi Milano and I am looking for something similar but I don't think they make that model any more. Any suggestions.
You could go for the Bianchi Milano. They are still made.
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Old 08-02-13, 07:23 PM   #10
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The Masi Soulville was sold around the same time as the Milano, when the Milano actually didn't look terrible, https://www.google.ca/search?q=bianc...w=1440&bih=817 .

I regret selling this bike, had the cruiser look, 700c wheels, light weight, it moved right along...


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Old 08-09-13, 05:48 PM   #11
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Define lightweight, I'm at 25lbs with this aluminum frame, decent spec MTB parts. I'll weigh a basic single speed Electra today and report back.


KHS Manhattan CM26 by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr

I think this is the coolest bike Ive seen in a loooong time !!
Nice!!!
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Old 08-11-13, 10:08 AM   #12
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Thanks!, I'm really digging it.
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Old 08-11-13, 11:27 AM   #13
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I used to assemble some aluminum Nirve cruisers, BITD. They were alarmingly heavy. Maybe they're lighter now. (It was like 8 years ago, that I worked at an LBS.) I never understood the appeal of an aluminum cruiser, except maybe a silver king....

"Lightweight cruiser" is a bit of an oxy-moron. IF you're looking for a lightweight, maybe you don't want a cruiser. If you really want a cruiser, maybe you'll live with the weight?

If not, you can always get a retrotec...http://www.ingliscycles.com/retrotec.php
These cost a lot, but can be built pretty light.

I just ordered one of these: http://www.genuinebicycleproducts.com/gallery.html The Genuine Article One, with the frame weighing 8.5 lbs, is far from lightweight. But, once I build it up with some rim brakes and decent components, it'll weigh far less than my Worksmen (Worksmans?) do...

You can still cruise, even with a 70lb bicycle...
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Old 08-11-13, 11:43 AM   #14
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The frame on my 1951 CCM was 5 pounds with the bottom bracket cups, built up it is just under 26 pounds and still has a good amount of steel parts... the lighter fixed wheels really knock down the weight and make cruising along a lot more enjoyable.

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Old 08-11-13, 07:50 PM   #15
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can not beat the price of the next la jolla . best bike for the money. under one hundred at wally world!!!
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Old 08-11-13, 08:22 PM   #16
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65er, I already complimented your CCM on the FGSS forum, where you posted the same pic in b&w. Awesome ride. That's a 28"-wheeled frame that you put 700c wheels on? What rear hub are you running? (I'm about 2.5 builds out from building my FG cruiser; based on a Worksman INB frame and m756 hubset...)

Incredible that they built those ol' CCMs so light. One of my "grail" bikes is a ccm flyte. (Awesome, also, that Canuckis were spelling things wrong in silly ways in the 1930s, long before AOL n whatnot.) For those unfamiliar with the Flyte: http://www.ccmflyte.com/
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Old 08-11-13, 08:29 PM   #17
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65er, I already complimented your CCM on the FGSS forum, where you posted the same pic in b&w. Awesome ride. That's a 28"-wheeled frame that you put 700c wheels on? What rear hub are you running? (I'm about 2.5 builds out from building my FG cruiser; based on a Worksman INB frame and m756 hubset...)

Incredible that they built those ol' CCMs so light. One of my "grail" bikes is a ccm flyte. (Awesome, also, that Canuckis were spelling things wrong in silly ways in the 1930s, long before AOL n whatnot.) For those unfamiliar with the Flyte: http://www.ccmflyte.com/
The hub is a Normandy high flange with a suicide hub I have been using for well over 5 years... if I found the right vintage track hubs I would build around those but these rather lightweight wheels have stood up to all kinds of use and abuse. Tyres are 38mm Avocet which fill the frame nicely.

I too was rather impressed that a frame with an extra top tube weighed as little as it did, I think this allowed them to use lighter tubing.

I plan to replicate this frame in Reynolds 531 and will probably fillet braze it instead of using lugs, will use better dropouts, and a modern bottom bracket to allow for more crank variations... I would be aiming for a bike weight of < 21 pounds.
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Old 08-18-13, 10:35 AM   #18
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I used to assemble some aluminum Nirve cruisers, BITD. They were alarmingly heavy. Maybe they're lighter now. (It was like 8 years ago, that I worked at an LBS.) I never understood the appeal of an aluminum cruiser, except maybe a silver king....

"Lightweight cruiser" is a bit of an oxy-moron. IF you're looking for a lightweight, maybe you don't want a cruiser. If you really want a cruiser, maybe you'll live with the weight?

If not, you can always get a retrotec...http://www.ingliscycles.com/retrotec.php
These cost a lot, but can be built pretty light.

I just ordered one of these: http://www.genuinebicycleproducts.com/gallery.html The Genuine Article One, with the frame weighing 8.5 lbs, is far from lightweight. But, once I build it up with some rim brakes and decent components, it'll weigh far less than my Worksmen (Worksmans?) do...

You can still cruise, even with a 70lb bicycle...
Retrotec is right at the top of the list if I were ever to go custom. As you know I'm interested in a Worksman which are by anyones standards not considered light weight. One of my hardtail mountain bikes has a 6.4lb frame, the thing is a beast but so much fun to ride. It's nice to have options, I'm car free so the light weight cruiser is perfect for longer distances, it's my everyday go to bike.

I'm really looking forward to seeing the finished Genuine Article One. One of my favourite frame designs.

I have to say though it's nice to ride a cruiser that requires hardly any effort to get rolling. Down to 23.5lbs, as they say "pics or it didn't happen".


DSC09190 by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr


DSC09191 by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr
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Old 08-18-13, 03:12 PM   #19
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I actually got a quote from retrotec before I found the Article 1, which is essentially the production version of what I wanted from Retrotec. Curt makes some hott frames/forks, though...

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DSC09191 by SaddleUpBike, on Flickr
You need to get that thing back up to 24+ lbs, and add some fenders, if you commute on it.... I rode one of my fenderless bikes to work today, and barely made it before the rain started.
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Old 08-19-13, 07:47 AM   #20
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Ha ha, my commute is 8 blocks long. I really want to see the quality of the welds on your Geniune, I've looked closely at them before but nitpicked and talked myself out of it based on the photos of his earlier builds, over thinking it obviously considering the price. The Genuine and Retrotec are worlds apart price wise. The Genuine has a kind of garage built vibe, the Retrotec is built by a master. How long will it take for your bike to arrive?
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Old 08-19-13, 09:11 AM   #21
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The Genuine has arrived already; I'm laeaving for vacation next week, but after that, I'm going to be gathering a few leftover components, and building it up.

First impressions are, none of the welds are pretty, but none look bad, to my eye. They definitely look strong. Apparently, the first generation of Genuines, which had 120mm rear spacing, 25.0mm seatposts, and some MIG welds, were a little sloppier looking. The new ones are spaced at 110mm, take a 25.4mm seatost, and are all-TIG. Plus, looking at some of the pics of earlier ones, versus the newer ones, it seems that the guys are laying down some smoother welds. Like I said, not pretty, but looking much improved.

Perfect welds are not something one expects from a builder with a "garage vibe", which describes Genuine to a T. TBF, though, Retrotec under Bob Seals, who Curt Inglis used to work for, had much more of that same garage vibe than Retrotec does today. I bought the Article1 b/c I wanted a tool; I was looking for a blunt object with which I could attack trails.
I may have been reluctant to use something as sparkly as a Retrotec; I'd be more reluctant to scratch it up.

For the price, though, I am happy with the Genuine. I bought a frame from True Torch a lil while back; the welds were gorgeous, but the rest of the experience was a trainwreck. Improperly spaced in the back, the seat-tube wasn't reamed, the top of the seattube needed some prep work before I could even mount a seat collar. The decals were peeling upon delivery, with blasting media all over the adhesive side, so they were useless. Powdercoat looked nice, but it's as soft as butter. The seatpost I got from them, s'posedly a 7/8", will not fit any frame I've got with a 7/8" post. Too wide. The chrome looks nice on it, but inside the post, it's all scale and rust. Terrible experience.

OTOH, everything on the Genuine is done right. Spacing's perfect, seatpost installs with no problem, clamp fits over it, everything is straight, strong, solid-- a nice frame. It does weight a ton, but the site makes it obvious that it's a heavy & overbuilt frame. Frankly, I figured it'd weight more.

I'm looking forward to building it up.
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Old 08-20-13, 07:05 AM   #22
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Now you got me thinking.... I'm waiting to see the completed bike, what colour did you get?
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Old 08-20-13, 09:09 AM   #23
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Black.
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Old 09-18-13, 10:52 PM   #24
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The frame on my 1951 CCM was 5 pounds with the bottom bracket cups, built up it is just under 26 pounds and still has a good amount of steel parts... the lighter fixed wheels really knock down the weight and make cruising along a lot more enjoyable.

bike is really sweet
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Old 10-14-13, 08:32 AM   #25
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Some great bikes in this thread!
Overall weight savings is great, but from my experience the ride quality of just about any stock balloon-tire (cruiser) bike can be improved by lightening up the tires and wheels.
The first thing to do tho is make sure all bearing surfaces are properly lubricated and adjusted.
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