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Beach Cruisers Do you love balloon tires and fenders? Do you love riding the simplicity of a single gear and coaster brakes or a single gear cluster? Do you love the classic curves in the tubing of a cruiser that takes you back to the 1950's and 1960's, stylistically? Here's your home! Welcome to the Beach Cruisers and Cruisers forum!

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Old 07-18-13, 12:28 PM   #1
Captain Rich
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Husky bicycles

Has anyone ever had a Husky? How well are they built? How smooth is the ride?

Thanks.
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Old 07-20-13, 11:07 AM   #2
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Husky is currently made by Sun Bicycles (same company makes the Miami Sun and Sun line of adult trikes).
The Husky is along the same lines as a Worksman quality and durability wise. Husky is very popular in the bicycle rental fleets in Key West, they last as long as or longer than a Worksman, and cost a lot less than the Worksman.
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Old 07-29-13, 11:27 PM   #3
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Husky is currently made by Sun Bicycles (same company makes the Miami Sun and Sun line of adult trikes).
The Husky is along the same lines as a Worksman quality and durability wise. Husky is very popular in the bicycle rental fleets in Key West, they last as long as or longer than a Worksman, and cost a lot less than the Worksman.
WHA?! Comparing apples to apples, the base Worksman INB retails for $389 MSRP. The analogous Husky is the HD-120, with a similar wheelset using 11g (aka .120 aka 2.9mm) spokes. These will have the same shimano cb-e110 hub, the same cranks, and very similar components all around. With the Husky, you save $40. You can save another $10 by buying the hd-105, with 12g spokes. I guess if you take it as a percentage of the cost, $40 is a "lot less" when comparing 2 very cheap bikes, but to me, $40 isn't much to spend.

I prefer the Worksman b/c the frame and some other components are made in Bklyn, b/c it has truly old-school spec (oversized 1" threaded headset vs the husky's 30.0mm standard headset, rearward facing "track-ends, 110mm rear spacing), and really cool variants (eg, LGB). However, the original paint on the Worksman is probably crayola watercolors; it chips easy, fades a lot, and the frame will have surface rust very quickly. I can only imagine that the Husky has better paint, but these tend to rust fairly quickly as well. (Never owned a Husky long-term, so I can't speak from experience.)

I do think that the Husky's straight downtube looks rockin', and way tougher than the curved Worksman downtube. But if you look at and measure the worksman downtube, you'll find it is the exact same length with the exact same bend as the toptube, which I think is a pretty cool way to streamline costs/parts. It's also got a classic, unmistakable shape as a result.

Pretty much any "industrial cruiser" is going to be built to a thin nickel, with a strong/heavy frame, strong/heavy wheels, and total crap for most all the other components. That being said, I really do like Worksman, and I have to confess that I've been tempted to buy a neon green Husky as well. (Just can't bring myself to do it, though; I like the INB too much...)
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Old 07-30-13, 06:36 AM   #4
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Well, not to repeat what's already been said but to perhaps put it in a better perspective.

Husky brand bikes are cheap bikes, designed to sell from department or super stores at a low price. In order to sell at a low price they have to be cheap, which means they are pretty cheaply made. The frames are generally strong steel, bit heavy. The components are bottom shelf and the assembly is usually fairly poor.

If you want a bike to ride around the block occasionally with the kids on then you a Husky will probably do. If you want to pursue cycling in any type of serious manner then a Husky will probably show it's weaknesses pretty quickly. Besides being very heavy you would probably start having issues with it needing adjustments fairly often, which is sometimes hard to do sometimes as the quality control is generally pretty low and things just don't "fit" just right. The local bike shop (LBS) may not want to help you either, some will NOT work on "department store bikes" as the cost to repair them often exceeds the original cost of the bike. Many a LBS have gotten stuck before by customers who won't pay for the repairs and give them the bike instead. Just what they need, another cheap bike in their inventory.

If you are at all serious then please go to a local bike shop and talk to them, with a little bit more money you can generally pick up something that is considerably better and will not be discouraging to ride. I've known a few people who have had the cheaper bikes and were delighted with them, and I've known MORE that soon start breaking things on them and the soon want to upgrade to a better quality bike because of it.

If money is tight and the bike is affordable then by all means start out on it, save your nickels after that and work your way up to a better bike. The important thing to do is to RIDE.
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Old 07-30-13, 08:18 AM   #5
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I've only seen Husky bikes available on the hushy site, industrial supply sites, and craigslist. Which dept store sells em?

Not much to adjust on a husky hd. just the opc bb, the shimano cb-e110 (good cb hub), and the 1" threaded headset. But, yeah, plan on buying new pedals, better tires, and probably a saddle...
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Old 07-30-13, 08:57 AM   #6
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I've only seen Husky bikes available on the hushy site, industrial supply sites, and craigslist. Which dept store sells em?

Not much to adjust on a husky hd. just the opc bb, the shimano cb-e110 (good cb hub), and the 1" threaded headset. But, yeah, plan on buying new pedals, better tires, and probably a saddle...
I think you are right it is HUFFY brand that was a department store bikes and Husky is an industrial brand.

That being said I think I am right in saying that they are a heavy bike that may tend to keep a rider back in performance. But hey, if it works then RIDE IT!
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Old 07-30-13, 11:05 AM   #7
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... they are a heavy bike that may tend to keep a rider back in performance.
Yeah, I think that describes most traditional cruisers, doesn't it?
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Old 07-30-13, 08:58 PM   #8
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One thing I notice is that some of the bikes are sort of regional. For example, I've NEVER seen a used Worksman tandem down here- they apparently were only sold in the northeast. Husky products come out of Mexico, I believe, so they're more prominent here. Mohawk is/was another industrial bike company in the Midwest, there was another one in Florida. I expect the quality is all similar, without a lot to recommend one over the others.
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Old 07-31-13, 08:21 AM   #9
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Stephen, i'm thinking that most of the Worksman tandems were sold to individuals as rec bikes. It only makes sense that folks in my neck of the woods (NJ) were willing to either ship or pick-up their tandem (or buy it second hand from a NYer), whereas Tejanos would probably balk at the concept. Still, we don't see a whole lot of Worksman tandems round here.

I've got a couple of worksmen(s); at least 2 of them I got as framesets from some Texan who sells em cheap on ratrodbikes.com. (Used indoors in an extremely arid area, and yet 4 year old frames were covered in surface rust, particularly on the stays. Amazingly bad paintjobs.)) Near as I can tell, b/c Texas held onto their factories for so much longer than a lot of NE states, that's where the most Industrial bikes are at these days. And, yes, Husky has some warehouses in Mexico, with the parent company (HLF) being stationed in Boostin' Houston. (Most of the frames/parts are made in Taiwan and China)
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Old 07-31-13, 08:28 AM   #10
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PS- Mohawks are imported; company is HQ'd in Tennessee. Emory used to build frames out of Florida. They've quit for now, but the dude who owns the company is trying to hatch some new schemes for building/selling US-made bicycles. There's also a company called Summit that makes a model called the Workhorse; t's pretty much a bolt-forbolt knock-off of a contemporary Schwinn Heavy Duti
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Old 08-06-13, 09:47 AM   #11
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plan on buying new pedals, better tires, and probably a saddle
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Old 08-06-13, 10:26 AM   #12
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plan on buying new pedals, better tires, and probably a saddle
I agree with that... but then again, I'd plan on that when buying just about any complete bicycle. Another option is to buy just thef rame, which is $140 plus shipping on the husky site. (I'd still rather take a Worksman though...)

**EDIT-- Of course i agree with that; I'd typed those very words a few posts up.... =P

Last edited by surreal; 08-06-13 at 10:28 AM. Reason: malarkey
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