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Beach Cruisers Do you love balloon tires and fenders? Do you love riding the simplicity of a single gear and coaster brakes or a single gear cluster? Do you love the classic curves in the tubing of a cruiser that takes you back to the 1950's and 1960's, stylistically? Here's your home! Welcome to the Beach Cruisers and Cruisers forum!

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Old 07-06-14, 09:48 PM   #1
DWillaman72
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Lightbulb Thoughts on Miami Sun Crusher 7 for big guy

Went down to the local bike shop (LBS? sorry I am a noob) and rode a Sun Crusher 7 with the tires max inflated. Keep in mind that I weigh 452 pounds. I asked the salesman what it was rated to hold and he said 400 and he said "you will be fine." Long story short it is only rated to 250 lbs upon my further investigation. I like the bike and need to get back into shape. It seemed to ride well and was comfortable for my less than graceful frame. And did I mention I love the fat tire cruisers!

What do I need to worry about with this bike and my weight? I thought about seeing if they could give the back tire a little bit of testosterone to beef it up (just in case). Any thoughts and/or comments will be considered thank you!
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Old 07-07-14, 08:45 AM   #2
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I thought about seeing if they could give the back tire a little bit of testosterone to beef it up (just in case).
this is compleat guessing on my part, but maybe the tires off a mongoose beast?

I have next to no experience with fat bikes, but the tires seem to be something people swap out first chance they get because they say they're heavy and thick like a motorcycle tire. if they are more heavy duty, maybe that could work in your favour. assuming they'd fit in your frame and on your rims, it probably wouldn't be too hard to come up with a set someone has taken off.

but like I said, I don't know much of anything about it. I have a beast but I'm not overly concerned about the tires and haven't looked at other tires to know the difference. maybe someone with more experience with the various fat bike tires could tell you for sure if it's worth fooling with and/or if they'd fit.
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Old 07-07-14, 10:29 AM   #3
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The tires on the Crusher are just a tad smaller than on the beast. However, being that it is not a big box store brand I almost have to believe the rims are built a little bit better than the beast.
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Old 07-07-14, 12:05 PM   #4
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I recommend you post your questions in the "Clydesdale" section. It's a forum dedicated to folks just like you, large but making lifestyle changes. Congrats by the way. There are lots of really knowledgable folks in there who have faced you exact dilema and can share true experience. You are likely to get helpul and TRUE answers. Good luck.

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
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Old 07-18-14, 02:41 AM   #5
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You are going to have rear wheel failures. I'm almost 300 lbs and I have to use hand built rear wheels. I ride a Sun Retro-7 cruiser. The other thing you may find is that you bend the rear "triangles", formed by the chain & seat stays. What happens to me when I bend them is that the right drop out ends up higher than the left, so the rear wheel is canted to the left at the top. All of my bikes other than the Retro-7 are bent this way, as was my thrasher "homeless guy" bike I bought from a heavy person who had bent it that way.
Stay with a cruiser style bike with 26" wheels. I get 6-900 miles on an OEM rear wheel.
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Old 07-18-14, 10:38 AM   #6
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Here we carry the Sun bikes crusher , it's a fat bike with 4"wide high volume tires

Sun Bicycles - Product..
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Old 07-18-14, 11:56 AM   #7
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If you're concerned about the weight carrying ability of any bike then consider a Worksman bike.

Worksman is built for ultra heavy loading.

Cargo Bikes, Industrial Bicycles and Industrial Tricycles from Worksman Cycles Factory Direct Store
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I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

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Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-18-14, 12:56 PM   #8
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+1 Worksman has very strong frames and wheels; the forks are strong enough to bear a huge load, but they don't take "hits" too well..... Concerns, for me, would be braking (you can get the optional drum brake, but it's kinda weak, IME) and, of course, you'll need new pedals. Worksman oughta be ashamed of their stock pedals. I've heard the stock saddle doesn't fare well under lots of weight, but I always ditch those massive pieces of velo-furniture immediately. 7/8" seatpost is skinny; I've bent a few and I weigh 250, but to be fair, I'm usually bombing trails on these things. Last concern I'd have is with the track-ends/"drop-outs"; Worksman builds a bombproof frame out of heavy guage steel, and then uses paper-thin stamped drop-outs. Being the type of guy who deals with old/well-used Worksman INB frames frequently, I've seen a few with saggy drop-outs. So far, I've had good success with just torqueing down the axle nuts and whispering a prayer, but it does worry me.

Oh, and not at all related to rider-weight, but still something everyone needs to consider when deciding on a Worksman: They seem to paint their frames with children's water-color paint, and they seem to use seawater to dilute it, b/c your Worksman will rust, blister, and bubble in the first year. I buy ex-warehouse Worksmen all the time; they usually are heavily coated in surface rust, especially on the stays, and they tend to only be between 5 and 7 years old when I get them. The steel has always been solid once I ground all the rust down, and they tend to look good after a fresh coat of powder or a decent repaint. I guess the sub-par paintjobs are one way that Woksman stays affordable...
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Old 07-19-14, 10:21 AM   #9
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Oh, and not at all related to rider-weight, but still something everyone needs to consider when deciding on a Worksman: They seem to paint their frames with children's water-color paint, and they seem to use seawater to dilute it, b/c your Worksman will rust, blister, and bubble in the first year. I buy ex-warehouse Worksmen all the time; they usually are heavily coated in surface rust, especially on the stays, and they tend to only be between 5 and 7 years old when I get them. The steel has always been solid once I ground all the rust down, and they tend to look good after a fresh coat of powder or a decent repaint. I guess the sub-par paintjobs are one way that Woksman stays affordable...
Worksman paints with simple air dry enamel paints in an ancient one man spray booth. While the paint doesn't last as long as fancy Acrylic paints ,that require special equipment to apply, it is easy to touch up or change. It helps to remember that a Worksman bike can take abuse other bikes just crumble under and come back for more. THAT to me is true value not a pretty face for weekend rides.
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I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

Originally Posted by krazygluon
Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?
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Old 07-19-14, 09:21 PM   #10
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Yeah, it don't gotta be pretty.... but there's probably a lot of grey area between "pretty" and "rusted out within a few years"...
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Old 07-22-14, 04:02 PM   #11
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I noticed a LOT of Miami Sun cruisers and Huskey "industrial" (made by Sun Bikes) bikes in the rental fleets in Key West, and very few (if any) Worksman in the rent-a-bike fleets.
Sun makes a rugged bike. If you're worried about weight capacity, get a Miami Sun standard adult trike or the Huskey "Industrial" trike. Load capacity is 500 pounds (including rider). You WILL want to change out the "tractor seat" for a standard cruiser seat. That damn "tractor seat" hits the back of the thighs, causing much pain when peddling. It also limits your top speed to something under 5 mph. with a cruiser seat you'll have a hard time keeping it under 10 - 12 mph (at least I do).
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Old 08-15-14, 07:01 AM   #12
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Huskey may be the anwser. the 120 holds 400 lbs

Husky Bicycles HUSKY 26" Industrial Bicycle Model HD-120 <b> FREE SHIPPING
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